Publications

New from Siddharth Kara

 
Bonded Labor by Siddharth Kara

Published September 25, 2012

Bonded Labor: Tackling the System of Slavery in South Asia is Kara's second explosive study of slavery, this time focusing on the pervasive, deeply entrenched, and wholly unjust system of bonded labor. From his eleven years of research in India, Nepal, Bangladesh, and Pakistan, Kara delves into this ancient and ever-evolving mode of slavery, which ensnares roughly six out of every ten slaves in the world and generates profits that exceeded $17.6 billion in 2011...

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Journal Articles

 
     Designing More Effective Laws Against Human Trafficking,” Siddharth Kara, Northwestern Journal of International Human Rights; 9(2): 123-147, June 30, 2011.
     Supply and Demand: Human Trafficking in the Global Economy,” Siddharth Kara, Harvard International Review; 33(2): 66-77, June 22, 2011.
     Twenty-First-Century Slaves: Combating Global Sex Trafficking,” Siddharth kara, Solutions Journal; 2(2), March 2, 2011.
     The Dark Side: Sex in Global Affairs,” Siddharth Kara, World Politics Review;  August 9, 2010.

 

United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees 2009 Report

        

“The Identification and Referral of Trafficked Persons
to Procedures for Determining International Protection Needs”

Part of the Legal & Protection Policy Research Series
Jacqueline Bhabha and Christina Alfirev
Harvard University Committee on Human Rights Studies

This consultancy report is the result of research carried out in 2008 on the identification and referral of trafficked persons, in particular trafficked children, to procedures of international protection. The study was conducted in 10 countries: Norway, Italy, Ireland, Serbia, Nigeria, South Africa, Thailand, Kyrgyzstan, Mexico and Israel. These countries span 5 regions and are known to be affected by human trafficking. They are also diverse in a range of aspects: some are developed, others developing countries; some have instituted successful, rudimentary identification and referral systems, others have not; some are predominantly destination countries, others are also source and transit countries for human trafficking. Jacqueline Bhabha, a lecturer at the Harvard Law School, supervised the research conducted by Christina Alfirev, a Master's Degree candidate at the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy.

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