Internship

interns 1 The student internships are designed to give a wide variety of opportunities for the students at Harvard to engage in Human Rights activities in Latin America. In some cases they will have a greater focus on research while in others the students will be much more active in the field.

Each experience will start with pre-internship courses taught by faculty from the Carr Center in combination with the Harvard Law School and the Graduate School of Education. The idea is to give students a theoretical background before their internships to send them better prepared for the experience. All internships will end with an evaluation of the experience, including a section describing to what extent the pre-internship courses helped the student engage.

interns 2 To allow for students to gain the experience they desire, the program will focus on a list of contacts that will expand depending on the interests of each student. Currently, we have contacts with academic and social institutions in Mexico, Colombia, Guatemala, and Venezuela. The focus of each of these programs will depend on the current projects being carried by the institution of each country. For example, due to our connection with SUMATE, as well as the research currently taking place at the Human Rights Center at UCAB, the Venezuela internship will mostly focus on civil rights and liberties within a weakened democracy. We are also including existing human rights internships programmed by the David Rockefeller Center for Latin American Studies and the University Committee on Human Rights Studies in Chile and Argentina. The list of contacts will increase continually to hopefully create a system in which students will have the flexibility to establish an internship that is best suited for them in an environment both academic and active in the field.

interns 3 The following links provide more information on the David Rockefeller Center for Latin American Studies (DRCLAS) programs: There will also be internships opportunities taking place within the United States. Currently, we have set up a connection with Human Rights Watch. Due to its high political profile in the region, HRW does not send interns to different countries. However, the students will get the opportunity to work with the Americas division, gaining insight into how HRW qualifies human rights violations as they are occur within this particular region. Further more they will learn how these findings affect the political stability of each democracy and how in turn their ability to work changes upon the publication of their findings.
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