2011-2012 Study Group

2011-2012
Latin American Study Group

“Poverty, Development and Human Rights in Latin America”

What is it about?

In order to explore new venues for the convergence of Poverty, Human Rights and Development; the Latin American Initiative at the Carr Center will bring together students, scholars and practitioners to look into poverty issues in Latin America. Our approach will combine different perspectives: the national level, the meso level, and the micro level, as well as various methods, all applied to Latin America.

Potential Specialists Involved

The Study group will consist in discussions (with a short selected list of readings) with specialist that will address country/specific issues related to their experience and/or academic background regarding the two issues mentioned above.

THANK YOU!

Study Group Schedule:


Wednesday,
April 25, 2012
4:00 - 6:00 pm
Carr Center Conference Room
Rubenstein Building
(Floor 2, Room 219)
Directions to Venue

Session 17
Erica Jaffe
will lead
"When Development is Exploitative:
A Critical Look at Actors, Communal Dynamics, and Human Rights
through the lens of mining on Wayuu territory"

Preparatory Readings:

Wednesday,
April 11, 2012
4:00 - 6:00 pm
Carr Center Conference Room
Rubenstein Building
(Floor 2, Room 219)
Directions to Venue

Session 16
Claire Barker
will lead
"A Conversation about Sustainability"

A Conversation about Sustainability

Claire Barker retired from a career with the MWRA and Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection to become an experienced development manager working with several organizations, including Engineers without Borders, Charles River Watershed Association, and the Carr Center's Human Right to Water Program. Her work has focused on environmental and economic sustainability, particularly in relation to the human rights to water. She will be discussing her experiences in the field relative to the challenges of sustainability and opening a conversation on how the group's experiences reflect the frameworks of human rights and sustainable development.

Preparatory Readings:

Wednesday,
April 4, 2012
4:00 - 6:00 pm
Carr Center Conference Room
Rubenstein Building
(Floor 2, Room 219)
Directions to Venue

Session 15
Prof. Robert Wilkinson
will discuss
"A Multi-Lens Approach to Development and Rights:
Food, Nutrition and Human Rights"

Within the arena of international governance, there exist several different paradigms and analytical "lens" we can apply to the very same problem. Each can lead us to different conclusions, especially if we are tending towards a rights perspective vs. a development perspective. Prof. Wilkinson will be discussing this principle and its implications.

Biography

Robert Wilkinson is an independent consultant, and Adjunct Faculty member of the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy at Tufts University. He has worked for 18 years in the fields of conflict resolution, negotiation and international development. Current projects include training Presidential Appointees at the White House in negotiation skills, and working with key parties to the conflict in Kashmir on development, governance and conflict resolution initiatives. Previously, Rob has worked with a wide range of clients, including PricewaterhouseCoopers, General Mills, USAID, The Red Cross, Save the Children, Mercy Corps and UNICEF. With PricewaterhouseCoopers, he was responsible for setting up and running their first office in Burundi. He successfully managed the oversight of a 2-year, $30 million dollar Security Sector Reform Program from 2009-11, working with the military, police, parliament and civil society. Formerly, Rob spent 6 years as a senior manager with the Department for International Development (DFID). As Head of the Policy and Research Division Cabinet, he was responsible for a $1 billion budget for global development policy and research work. Before that, he was DFID's Senior Adviser on Conflict issues, and was the lead author for their first policy on Conflict. He has held senior staff positions in Oxfam and the United Nations Department for Peacekeeping Operations (DPKO), and worked in field locations including Nicaragua, Angola, Rwanda, Burundi, DRC, Kenya, Sierra Leone, Uganda, Laos and Kashmir. Robert Wilkinson is a member of the UK International Advisory Board of experts for the Center for Security Sector Management (CSSM). He is also a founding board member of the NGO Peace Direct US. He earned his Masters Degree from Stanford University, and a Bachelor’s from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). Rob currently teaches graduate courses at Fletcher on conflict resolution, human rights and international development.

Preparatory Readings:
Presentation Slides:

Wednesday,
March 28, 2012
4:00 - 6:00 pm
Carr Center Conference Room
Rubenstein Building
(Floor 2, Room 219)
Directions to Venue

Session 14
Screening and discussion of the film
"Chichasmi/Dialogo"
and
the use of ADR strategies in development conflicts

More than one thousand kilometers separate the Wampi Amazonian communities from the Peruvian Capital. In those distances abysmal differences are forged in the visions of development and the future of the environment.

"Chichasmi" - Which means dialogue in the local language- is a journey from the remote Amazonian villages to the offices of the central government in Lima, listening to the voices and glimpsing at the possibility of dialogue.

Directed and produced by Gabriel Dvoskin, Sayara Media and Communication.

Preparatory Readings:
  • Dialogue/Chichasmi web site.
  • "Geotracking the protests on Perus Bagua massacre," Locast web site.
  • "Peru's president approves indigenous consultation law," BBC News.
  • "Peru's Amazonian groups to launch political party," BBC News.
  • "Can an economist save Peru?" BBC radio.
  • "Can free market economics boost Amazonian land rights?" BBC News.
  • "The Peruvian Amazon is not Avatar," ILD web site.

Wednesday,
March 21, 2012
4:00 - 6:00 pm
Carr Center Conference Room
Rubenstein Building
(Floor 2, Room 219)
Directions to Venue

Session 13
Yael Marciano
willl discuss:
"'El Sistema' and its successful implementation in different settings to support development through classical music education in orchestras."

Yael Marciano, 2012 fellow at the Weatherhead Center for International Affairs, will be discussing her research on "El Sistema" and its successful implementation in different settings to support development through classical music education in orchestras.

Presentation Materials:
Preparatory Readings:

Wednesday,
March 7, 2012
4:00 - 6:00 pm
Carr Center Conference Room
Rubenstein Building
(Floor 2, Room 219)
Directions to Venue

Session 12
Prof. Marty Chen
willl discuss:
"Linkages between economic rights, poverty, and development
within the informal economy."

Martha Chen is a Lecturer in Public Policy at the Harvard Kennedy School and International Coordinator of the global research-policy-action network Women in Informal Employment: Globalizing and organizing (WIEGO). An experienced development practitioner and scholar, her areas of specialization are employment, gender, and poverty with a focus on the working poor in the informal economy.

Before joining Harvard in 1987, she had two decades of resident experience in Bangladesh working with BRAC (now the world's largest non-governmental organization), and in India where she served as field representative of Oxfam America for India and Bangladesh. Dr. Chen received a Ph.D. in South Asia Regional Studies from the University of Pennsylvania. She is the author of numerous books including The Progress of the World's Women 2005: Women, Work and Poverty (co-authored with Joann Vanek, Francie Lund, James Heintz, Renana Jhabvala and Chris Bonner), Mainstreaming Informal Employment and Gender in Poverty Reduction (co-authored with Joann Vanek and Marilyn Carr), Women and Men in the Informal Economy: A Statistical Picture (co-authored with Joann Vanek) and Perpetual Mourning: Widowhood in Rural India. Dr. Chen was awarded a high civilian award, the Padma Shri, by the Government of India in April 2011.

Prof. Chen will be discussing the economic rights of urban informal workers: home-based producers, street vendors, and waste pickers, within the frame of linkages between economic rights, poverty, and development.

Preparatory Readings:

Wednesday,
February 29, 2012
4:00 - 6:00 pm
Carr Center Conference Room
Rubenstein Building
(Floor 2, Room 219)
Directions to Venue

Session 11
Prof. Dan Levy
willl discuss:
"Quantitative ways of measuring development
with a focus on
Jamaica's PATH Conditional Cash Transfer program."

Dan Levy, Lecturer in Public Policy and Faculty Chair of MPA Programs, teaches courses in quantitative methods and program evaluation. He is currently directing impact evaluations of school construction programs in Burkina Faso and Niger. He was recently involved in the evaluation of a conditional cash transfer program in Jamaica, a technical assistance project to Mexico's Social Development Ministry (Sedesol), the evaluation of an after-school program in the U.S., and a methodological review of studies comparing the use of various methods to estimate program impacts. He has served as a senior researcher at Mathematica Policy Research, is a lab affiliate at the Poverty Action Lab (MIT), and has served as a consultant to several organizations including the World Bank, the Inter-American Development Bank, and the Global Development Network (GDN). He received his Ph.D. in Economics from Northwestern University, grew up in Venezuela, and is fluent in Spanish and French.

Preparatory Readings:

Wednesday,
February 15, 2012
4:00 - 6:00 pm
Carr Center Conference Room
Rubenstein Building
(Floor 2, Room 219)
Directions to Venue

Session 10
Leonardo Vivas
will discuss:
"Approaches to democracy, human rights
and development in the region."

Preparatory Readings:
  • none at this time

Wednesday,
February 8, 2012
4:00 - 5:30 pm
Carr Center Conference Room
Rubenstein Building
(Floor 2, Room 219)
Directions to Venue

Session 9
A presentation by
Maria Green,
"Integrating Human Rights and Development in Theory and Practice"

Maria Green has long worked in human rights and development, with a particular focus on global standards for economic, social and cultural rights as well as on the practical implementation of human rights standards as part of development policy and practice.

A lawyer and professor, Maria has experience both in NGOs and in academia, most recently at Brandeis University, where she was part of the core faculty in Sustainable International Development between 2003 and 2011. Her writings include “What We Talk About When We Talk About Indicators: Current Approaches to Human Rights Measurement” (Human Rights Quarterly, 2001); “Integrating Enforcement of Human Rights Laws with Enforcement of Trade Laws: Some Baseline Issues” (in Human Rights and International Trade, ed. Elisabeth Burgi, Thomas Cottier and Joost Pauwelyn, Oxford University Press, 2005); and, with Susan Randolph, “Bringing Theory Into Practice: Operationalizing the Right to Development” (in The Right to Development in Practice: Studies for the Twenty-fifth Anniversary of the Declaration, United Nations Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights, forthcoming Summer 2011).

For a complete biography please go to:

http://www.northeastern.edu/law/academics/institutes/phrge/who/green.html

Preparatory Readings:

Wednesday,
November 30, 2011
1:15 - 2:15 pm
Carr Center Conference Room
Rubenstein Building
(Floor 2, Room 219)
Directions to Venue

Session 8
"Colombia's Reintegration Process:
Economic and Social Challenges
from the Perspective of the Female Demobilized,"
a conversation with
Erin McFee

Overview:

Erin McFee is a Research Associate in Harvard
Business School’s organizational behavior and
strategy units and the Lead Research Associate
with Organizing for Health.

Areas of Expertise:

In all of her work, McFee is concerned with the human experience of personal growth and community and the way in which interpersonal relationships can facilitate or undermine this process. She is currently conducting independent field work in Colombia on the process of reintegrating ex-combatants from illegal armed groups into the civilian population. This research focuses on issues of gender,violence and stigma. Additionally, she examines elements of community readiness for self-organized change.

McFee is the co-author with Director of the Latin American Initiative, Leonardo Vivas of “The Double Bind of Violence among Colombia’s Demobilized Population: Exile, Self-Exile, and Reconciliation in the Reintegration Process,” which is currently under final review at the Revista de Estudios Colombianos. She has also co-authored numerous Harvard Business School cases and teaching notes on professional service firms, organizational identification, and teams. Her other research interests include: leadership, leading change, health care, and the role of the state.

Qualifications and Affiliations:

McFee holds an MBA from the Simmons School of Management, a BSBA in Finance from Boston University’s School of Management, and a Certificate from the Harvard Kennedy School’s Executive Education program on Leading Change.

Preparatory Readings:

Wednesday,
November 9, 2011
1:15 - 2:15 pm
Carr Center Conference Room
Rubenstein Building
(Floor 2, Room 219)
Directions to Venue

Session 7
A discussion with Rosa Amaro,
President, Movement for the Health of La Oroya, Peru
and
Hannah Owusu-Koranteng,
Deputy Executive Director, WACAM

OXFAM's Extractive Industries Campaign is doing a speakers tour in the USA with a Ghanaian and a Peruvian community women both affected by extractive operations.

The speakers will discuss the realities of women living near mining operations. In particular, about the challenges and the opportunities for women to make their voices heard and advocate for action to bring about change in their own communities.

Rosa Amaro- President, Movement for the Health of La Oroya- Peru
Rosa is President of the MOSAO (Movement for the Health of La Oroya), a social organization founded in 2002, with the goal of advocating at the national and international level around the severe health damage caused by the activities of La Oroya Metallurgical Complex, a lead smelter. The operations in La Oroya have been open since 1997 under the U.S. company, Doe Run Peru. Rosa’s family lives in La Oroya Antigua, the neighborhood most affected by pollution. She is a mother of two sons, the youngest of which suffers from severe hearing problems that have led them to seek specialized care in Lima. Citizens of La Oroya who are against the mining activities have been victims of harassment, threats and abuse.


Hannah Owusu-Koranteng- Deputy Executive Director, Wassa Association of Communities Affected by Mining (WACAM)- Ghana
Hannah is an Agriculturist / Environmentalist with a Diploma in Horticulture from the Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology, Kumasi and an M.A. in Environmental Management and Policy from the University of Cape Coast. Hannah held the position as technical officer and Subject Matter Specialist on Women Farmers for 18 years with the Ghanaian Ministry of Food and Agriculture. Following her time at the Ministry, she worked with the General Agricultural Workers’ Union as a Project Coordinator of the Rural Workers’ Programme. As a worker of the trades union, she served as a member of the ILO Task Force on Informal Workers and was a part of the drafting Committee on Informal Economy and Decent work at the 90th ILO meeting in Geneva. Hannah is a founding Member of Wacam, a mining advocacy NGO in Ghana. She worked with Wacam as a Volunteer and member of the Executive Council since its official launch in 1998. Hannah took up a permanent appointment with Wacam in 2003 as the Deputy Executive Director responsible for Training, Research, campaigns and project implementation. She has been working on transparency issues in Ghana since 2003 and was nominated to represent civil society organizations on the Ghana Extractive Industries Transparency Initiative (EITI) Secretariat in 2010.

Preparatory Readings:

Wednesday,
October 26, 2011
2:30 - 3:30 pm
Darman Seminar Room (T135)
Taubman Building
(CPL, Floor 1, Room 135)
Directions to Venue

Session 6
Haiti Reconstruction Process: Accountability and
Sustainability from a social perspective: A missing link?

Diego Osorio
Senior Operations Officer, Haiti Reconstruction Fund, World Bank

This week we will look at the dimension of human rights, dignity, and the need for an individual centered approach to reconstruction in order to ensure its sustainability.

Preparatory Readings:
Additional Materials:


Wednesday,
October 19, 2011
1:15 - 2:15 pm
Carr Center Conference Room
Rubenstein Building
(Floor 2, Room 219)
Directions to Venue

Session 5
Impact Evaluation: The Use of Evidence to Inform Policy
with Cristobal Marshall, Policy Manager at J-PAL Global

Cristobal Marshall

Policy Manager: J-PAL Global
Program Manager: Finance
Program Staff: Political Economy & Governance

Cristobal Marshall joined J-PAL in 2010 to perform cost-effectiveness analysis and write policy memos to disseminate lessons from J-PAL’s evaluations to policymakers. He also collaborates in J-PAL’s policy outreach and works in regional as well as thematic initiatives. He gained extended policy experience as economic advisor at the Ministry of Finance Chile. Between 2005 and 2008 he worked in the design and drafting of several bills passed by the National Congress in areas of taxation, public finance, innovation and credit access for SME. He also performed financial evaluations and took part in the legislative process of those bills. In 2008 he drafted the Memorandum in Innovation Policy for the entrance of Chile into the OECD.

Cristobal holds an MPA/ID from Harvard Kennedy School where he obtained the “Outstanding Award” for his Second Year Policy Paper (SYPA). He also holds a B.A. in Economics from Universidad Catolica de Chile (PUC) where he was awarded the “Best Graduate in Economics" award.

Preparatory Readings:

Wednesday,
October 12, 2011
1:15 - 2:15 pm
Carr Center Conference Room
Rubenstein Building
(Floor 2, Room 219)
Directions to Venue

Session 4
The Trade-off of Growth and Inequality

Please join us for a discussion of the trade-off of growth and inequality.

Preparatory Readings:

Wednesday,
September 28, 2011
1:15 - 2:15 pm
Carr Center Conference Room
Rubenstein Building
(Floor 2, Room 219)
Directions to Venue

Session 3
The Integration of Human Rights into Sustainable Human Development
a presentation by Prof. Stephen Marks

Please join us for this presentation by Professor Stephen Marks, the François-Xavier Bagnoud Professor of Health and Human Rights, Harvard School of Public Health. All are welcome!

More About Professor Steven Marks:

The emphasis of Stephen Marks's work is on the interface of health and human rights, drawing on the disciplines of international law, international politics, international organizations, and international economics.

Professor Marks's recent research has focused on integrating human rights into sustainable human development; biotechnology and human rights; impunity for mass atrocities; terrorism and human rights; cultural rights; tobacco control; access to medicines, and human rights education. He has published recent books, articles or book chapters in each of these areas. He directs Harvard Series on Health and Human Rights at Harvard University Press.

He recently co-edited a book on Development as a Human Right: Legal, Political and Economic Dimensions and a reader on Perspectives on Health and Human Rights, (second edition, 2010). His book Health and Human Rights: Basic International Documents, is now in its second edition. He is preparing for publication in 2011 The Right to Health in Comparative Perspective (in the Harvard Series on Health and Human Rights) and Freedom from Poverty as a Human Right: Economic Perspectives (to be published by UNESCO and University of Pennsylvania Press in 2011).Professor Marks is currently collaborating with Prof. Balakrishnan Rajagopal on a book on human rights and development for Edward Elgard Publishing. He is editing a volume on the right to development for the Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights, to be published in 2011.

In his capacity as Senior Fellow at the University Committee on Human Rights Studies, he developed a strategy for human rights learning in Harvard College in collaboration with the Faculty of Arts and Sciences and is teaching two courses in the college as part of the expanded human rights curriculum.   Faculty Biography

Preparatory Readings:

Wednesday,
September 21, 2011
1:15 - 2:15 pm
Perkins Room
Rubenstein Building
(Floor 4)
Directions to Venue

Session 2
Income Inequality and Health in Brazil,
a presentation by Alexandre Chiavegatto Filho

Please join us for this presentation where Alexandre Chiavegatto Filho, Master's Candidate, Harvard School of Public Health, will discuss income inequality and health in Brazil. All are welcome!

Preparatory Readings:

Wednesday,
September 14, 2011
1:15 - 2:15 pm
Carr Center Conference Room
Rubenstein Building
(Floor 2, Room 219)
Directions to Venue

Session 1
Introductory meeting of the Poverty, Human Rights and Development in Latin America Study Group

Please join us for the introductory meeting of the Poverty, Human Rights and Development in Latin America Study Group. Our goal for the series will be to explore new venues for the convergence of Poverty, Human Rights and Development. To this end, the Latin American Initiative at the Carr Center will bring together students, scholars and practitioners to look into poverty issues in Latin America. Our approach will combine different perspectives: the national level, the meso level, and the micro level, as well as various methods, all applied to Latin America. All are welcome!

Preparatory Readings:
Follow-Up Materials: