The Sexuality, genger & Human Rights Program

Advisors

The Carr Center Sexuality, Gender, and Human Rights Program benefits from the wise counsel and active participation of its distinguished Advisory Collective, whose members include:

Kevin Bales Kevin Bales, co-founder, Free the Slaves.

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Sarah Bouchat Sarah Bouchat, is currently a PhD student in Political Science at the University of Wisconsin–Madison, studying corruption and democratization. A 2011 MPP graduate of the Kennedy School, she focused her prior studies and activism on gender and human rights, completing a Policy Analysis Exercise that investigated the mobilizing strategies of LGBTQ civil society organizations in Southeast Asia. After graduating from the Kennedy School, she worked as a Research Associate at the National Endowment for Democracy, where she contributed to research investigating issues of gender, youth, political parties, foreign aid, and civil society in democratization processes worldwide. During her time at the Kennedy School, Bouchat was a research associate and Traub-Dicker Fellow at the Carr Center, founding editor of the LGBTQ Policy Journal, and co-chair of the LGBTQ Caucus.

Eliza Byard Eliza Byard, Executive Director, Gay, Lesbian, and Straight Education Network (GLSEN).

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Sean Cahill Sean Cahill, Director of Health Policy Research at the Fenway Institute. He is also Adjunct Assistant Professor of Public Administration at New York University’s Robert Wagner School of Public Service. 

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Christopher Capozzola Christopher Capozzola, Associate Professor of History, Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

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Noam Chomsky Noam Chomsky, Institute Professor and Professor of Linguistics Emeritus, Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

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Harvey Cox Harvey Cox, Hollis Research Professor of Divinity, Harvard University.

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David Dodge David Dodge, is a recent graduate of the Harvard Kennedy School of Government where he worked as the Program Assistant for the Sexuality, Gender, and Human Rights Program. His award-winning master's thesis, “Messaging in LGBTQ Ballot Initiative Campaigns: Winning the Hearts & Minds of Voters through Persuasive Media” provided an analysis of the messaging techniques utilized by both pro- and anti-LGBTQ advocates over the last two decades. Before coming to the Kennedy School, David worked as an electoral and grassroots community organizer and researcher. From 2008 to 2010, he served as coordinator of the Right to the City-NYC alliance, a grouping of over 20 community organizations fighting displacement in low-income communities. During this time, he also worked as a research associate with the Urban Justice Center, where he conducted research and produced a variety of reports with community-based organizing groups.

Martin Duberman Martin Duberman, award-winning historian and playwright, and founder, Center for Lesbian and Gay Studies, City University of New York.

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Sandi DuBowski Sandi DuBowski, acclaimed filmmaker, Trembling Before G-d and A Jihad for Love, and founder, Films That Change the World.

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Paul Farmer Paul Farmer, Kolokotrones University Professor and Chair, Department of Global Health and Social Medicine, Harvard Medical Chair, and co-founder, Partners in Health.

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Liza Featherstone Liza Featherstone, writer and contributing editor, The Nation.

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Johanna Fernandez Johanna Fernandez, Assistant Professor of History, Baruch College.

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Marshall Ganz Marshall Ganz, Lecturer on Public Policy, Harvard Kennedy School.

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E.J. Graff E.J. Graff, is an author, journalist, and media critic who has written widely on social justice and human rights issues, particularly discrimination and violence against women and children; marriage and family policy; and lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender lives. She is a resident scholar at the Brandeis Women’s Studies Research Center.
For fifteen years, E.J. Graff was one of the few openly lesbian writers speaking and publishing in the mainstream media about LGBT issues. Her groundbreaking book, What Is Marriage For? The Strange Social History of Our Most Intimate Institution (Beacon Press, 1999, 2004), examined 2500 years of marriage to ask why same-sex couples belong today. Appearing five years before Massachusetts became the first U.S. state to marry same-sex couples, What Is Marriage For? has been called “essential reading” by leaders in the same-sex marriage debates. Her book and related writings on same-sex marriage have been quoted by government policymaking bodies, entered as courtroom exhibits, cited in law reviews, and assigned as course texts.

E.J. Graff’s work has appeared in such venues as the New York Times Magazine, The Washington Post, The Boston Globe, Columbia Journalism Review, Democracy Journal, Foreign Policy, Los Angeles Times, TheAtlantic.com, The Nation, The New Republic, Salon.com, The Village Voice, Women’s Review of Books, and in more than a dozen anthologies. She has been a contributing blogger at Slate.com’s XX Factor and at TPMCafe.com. She has appeared in several documentaries; is regularly interviewed by public and commercial media outlets such as NPR, ABC, CBC, BBC, PBS, MTV, satellite radio, and cable news; and gives talks and engages in debates in public forums in the U.S. and abroad.

Jorie Graham Jorie Graham, Pulitzer Prize-winning poet and Boylston Professor of Rhetoric and Oratory, Harvard University.

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Jacqueline Dowd Hall Jacqueline Dowd Hall, Spruill Professor of History and Director, Southern Oral History Program, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

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Peniel E. Joseph Peniel E. Joseph, Professor of History, Tufts University.

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Siddharth Kara Siddharth Kara, Adjunct Lecturer in Public Policy; Director, Program on Human Trafficking and Modern Slavery; and author, Sex Trafficking: Inside the Business of Modern Slavery, Bonded Labor: Inside the System of Slavery in South Asia.

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Moushumi Khan Moushumi Khan, civil rights attorney.

Moushumi Khan is the Director of Legal and Compliance at BRAC, the world's largest development organization. She earned her J.D. degree from the University of Michigan Law School in 1996 and a Master's in Public Administration degree from the John F. Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University in 2008 where she was also a Zuckerman Fellow at the Center for Public Leadership. She received an A.B. degree in Critical Social Thought, cum laude, from Mount Holyoke College in 1993 and was awarded a Certificate in General Course in the Government Department of the London School of Economics in 1991.

Ms. Khan has over 14 years of experience in the non-profit, economic development and law sectors. She defines herself as a bridge and a community builder. She has advised non-profit organizations such as the Grameen Bank and InterAction. She has served as a legal counselor to companies, including helping them design effective public/private partnerships, employee diversity policies, mediate conflicts between employers and their employees and the larger community. Most recently she was in private practice in New York City for almost a decade concentrating on civil rights and corporate law. Her clients included the local Bangladeshi and immigrant populations, public and private institutions, among others. She is a co-founder and the first President of the Muslim Bar Association of New York. She is a leading emerging voice on entrepreneurship, interfaith and immigrant identity issues, writing and speaking frequently on these topics.

Naomi Klein Naomi Klein, journalist and author, The Shock Doctrine and No Logo.

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Ian K. Lekus

Ian K. Lekus, historian and activist.

 A Boston-based historian and activist, Ian Lekus researches in modern US & global history, sexuality & gender studies, the politics and culture of the HIV/AIDS pandemic, and peace and conflict studies. Dr. Lekus (B.A., Cornell; M.A. and Ph.D., Duke) has taught at Harvard, Duke, Tufts, and several other universities. He is completing a manuscript, Queer and Present Dangers: Masculinity, Sexuality, and Protest in the Sixties, under advance contract with the University of North Carolina Press. He is developing a new research project on U.S. federal and international grassroots responses to the HIV pandemic, preliminarily titled Fluid Power: HIV/AIDS, Foreign Policy, and Grassroots Activism. His research has been published in Radical History Review, Peace and Change, the OAH Magazine of History, and in the anthologies, Modern American Queer History and The New Left Revisited.

He is the immediate past Chair of the Committee on Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender History, an affiliate society of the American Historical Association, and previously served as the Committee’s Book Review Editor. He is also serving as Secretary of the Peace History Society and on the editorial board of The Sixties: A Journal of History, Politics, and Culture. He has co-founded H-Peace, the H-Net online community for peace history and peace studies, as well as Rainbow Triangle, a community oral history project documenting LGBTQ history in Raleigh-Durham.


Arthur Lipkin Arthur Lipkin, Chair, Massachusetts Commission on GLBT Youth.

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Sarah Madison Sarah Madison, Associate Professor Sarah Maddison, BA (Hons) UTS, PhD Sydney, is an Australian Research Council Future Fellow based in the School of Social Sciences and International Studies at the University of New South Wales in Sydney, Australia. Previously Sarah was the Research Director in the Indigenous Policy and Dialogue Research Unit in the Social Policy Research Centre, and prior to that she was Senior Associate Dean in the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences. Her areas of research expertise include social movements (including the women's and LGBTI movements), Indigenous political culture, Australian democracy and democratic participation, gender politics, and democratic dialogue. She has published widely and her recent books include Activist Wisdom (with Sean Scalmer, UNSW Press 2006), Silencing Dissent (Allen & Unwin 2007, co-edited with Clive Hamilton), Black Politics (Allen & Unwin 2009), Beyond White Guilt (Allen & Unwin 2011) and Unsettling the Settler State (Federation Press 2011, co-edited with Morgan Brigg).

Jane Mansbridge Jane Mansbridge, Adams Professor of Political Leadership and Democratic Values, Harvard Kennedy School.

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Rev. Irene Monroe Rev. Irene Monroe, Huffington Post blogger and theologian.

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darnell L. Moore Darnell L. Moore, nationally recognized writer and activist. 

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Monique W. Morris Monique W. Morris, writer, activist, and CEO, MWM Consulting Group, LLC.

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Pedro Noguera Pedro Noguera, Peter L. Agnew Professor of Education, New York University.

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Richard Parker Richard Parker, Lecturer on Public Policy and Senior Fellow, Shorenstein Center, Harvard Kennedy School.

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Elliott Prasse-Freeman Elliott Prasse-Freeman is Founding Research Fellow at the Carr Center for Human Rights Policy’s “Human Rights and Social Movements Program” at Harvard University, and is currently an advisor of the “Sexuality, Gender, and Human Rights initiative” there. He holds an undergraduate degree with honors from Harvard University and a master’s degree in Development Economics from Harvard’s Kennedy School.

He researches and writes on post-sovereign politics and power, especially as it manifests in the underdeveloped world, and how discourses surrounding Development assistance, Human Rights, and humanitarian apparatuses influence this ecology. Research projects include: Burma/Myanmar politics, looking particularly at the transnational human rights movement in and around the country; the way humanitarian/human rights discourses intersect with and support the USA’s Global War on Terror; “human trafficking” as a discourse and set of practices that ideologically and materially reinforces the statist/capitalist goal of constraining nomadic bodies flowing across borders; the respective aesthetics of radical and liberal politics, including journalistic, cinematic, and other mediatized representations; the politics of resource extraction and its intersection with semi-organized violence and socio-political movements in sub-Saharan Africa. His work has been published in Journal of Asian Studies, Foreign Policy, al Jazeera English, and The New Inquiry, amongst others.

Prasse-Freeman also currently works in the International Development sector, assisting the execution of social movements that design and advocate for the institution of frameworks that manage natural resource rents in underdeveloped sub-Saharan African states. Prior to this he worked with various agencies in Southeast Asia for four years, working with the United Nations system (UNICEF and UNDP), in Burma, and then living in Thailand where he managed projects in China, India, Lao, Cambodia and Vietnam. 

Frank Rich Frank Rich, Writer-at-Large, New York Magazine.

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Sayres Rudy Sayres Rudy, Visiting Professor of Politics, Hampshire College.

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Juliet Schor Juliet Schor, Professor of Sociology, Boston College.

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Sarah Schulman Sarah Schulman, writer, professor, and co-director, ACT-UP Oral History Project.

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E. Benjamin Skinner E. Benjamin Skinner, journalist and author, A Crime So Monstrous.

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John Stauffer John Stauffer, Professor of English and of African and African American Studies, and Chair, American Civilization Program, Harvard University.

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Rose Styron Rose Styron, poet and human rights activist.

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Zoe Trodd Zoe Trodd, Professor and Chair of American Literature, University of Nottingham.

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Tommy Tseng Tommy Tseng, is the program manager at API Equality-LA where he directs ongoing research and oversees communications activities. At API Equality-LA, Tommy has designed and implemented the first study of its kind on the attitudes of Chinese and Korean Americans toward LGBT people.

Since 2003, he has worked for labor unions, political campaigns, and other issue campaigns, including AFSCME International Union, SEIU-United Healthcare Workers West, and Congresswoman Judy Chu's election campaign.

He has served as the Editor-in-Chief for the Harvard Journal of Asian American Policy Review and Editor for the LGBTQ Policy Journal of Harvard Kennedy School. His research interests include LGBT human rights, public perception of LGBT people, and Asian American political participation.

He currently serves on the board of New Leaders Council – Los Angeles, Chinese Rainbow Association, and the Harvard Kennedy School Alumni Network of Greater Los Angeles.

Tommy received his Master in Public Policy from the John F. Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University and his Bachelor of Arts in political science from University of California, Los Angeles. He was a Public Policy and International Affairs Fellow at the Goldman School of Public Policy at University of California, Berkeley and studied for a semester at the National Autonomous University of Mexico in Mexico City.

Urvashi Vaid Urvashi Vaid, Director, Engaging Tradition Project, Center for Gender and Sexuality Law, Columbia University, and author, Irresistible Revolution: Race, Class, and the LGBT Imagination. 

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Cornel West Cornel West, Professor of Philosophy and Christian Practice, Union Theological Seminary.

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Julie Boatright Wilson Julie Boatright Wilson, Harry Kahn Senior Lecturer in Social Policy, and Director, Malcolm Weiner Center for Social Policy, Harvard Kennedy School.

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