Sustainability Science Program

Angela Livino

Angela Livino

Angela LivinoMs. Angela Livino
Sustainability Science Program
Kennedy School of Government
Mailbox 81
Harvard University
79 JFK Street
Cambridge, MA 02138 USA
Office: 502 Rubenstein Building
Tel:
Email: angela_livino@hks.harvard.edu
Group affiliation: Giorgio Ruffolo Doctoral Research Fellow in Sustainability Science
Based in Brazil

Angela Livino is a Giorgio Ruffolo Doctoral Research Fellow in the Sustainability Science Program at Harvard’s School of Engineering and Applied Sciences. She is a doctoral student in water resources at the Civil Engineering Program at the Federal University of Rio de Janeiro. She is a senior advisor on energy supply at Empresa de Pesquisa Energetica (EPE), Brazil’s agency for power planning (2005- ). Based in Brazil, Angela is contributing to collaborative work with the Initiative on Sustainable Development in Amazonia: Land Use and the Hydrologic Cycle led by Professor Paul Moorcroft. Her work assesses the impact of changed Amazon water balances for precipitation and hydrology on the operation of hydropower stations and explores how the design and operation of hydropower plants might be modified to adapt to changed hydrological patterns. Prior to her work at EPE she was a senior engineer at Operador Nacional do Sistema Eletrico (1998-2001). She is a recipient of a Fulbright Fellowship (2012-13). She received a Masters of Engineering in water resources (2001) and a Bachelor of Sciences in Civil Engineering (1999) from the Federal University of Rio de Janeiro. Her masters work developed a stochastic model to forecast daily stream flow in to be used in operating programming of hydropower plants in Brazil. Her faculty host is John Briscoe.

Analyzing the impacts of climate change on Amazon rivers and the implications for energy development: A case study on Tapajos River Basin
This work analyzes water management, land use, and hydropower potential in one of the tributaries of the Amazon River. In Brazil there are several major hydroelectric projects under construction or in development that will provide over 25,000 MW of new hydropower capacity. This includes dams on the Xingu, Madeira, Tapajos, and Tocantins rivers. This work aims to analyze possible impacts of land use and climate change on Tapajos River Basin. This work builds on work underway in Professor Paul Moorcroft’s lab to model the effect of climate change on vegetation and the resulting impact on regional water balances. The work assesses the impact of changed Amazon water balances for precipitation, evapotranspiration and runoff on the operation of hydropower stations and explores how the design and operation of hydropower plants might be modified to adapt to changed hydrological patterns.

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