Sustainability Science Program

Fábio Pereira

Fábio Pereira

Fábio Pereira Dr. Fábio Pereira
Organismic and Evolutionary Biology Department
Harvard University
26 Oxford Street
Cambridge, MA 02138 USA
Office: Moorcroft Lab, Suite 43
Tel: (1) 617-495-1621
Email: fabio_pereira@hks.harvard.edu
Group affiliation: Giorgio Ruffolo Post-doctoral Research Fellow in Sustainability Science

Fábio Pereira is a Giorgio Ruffolo Post-doctoral Research Fellow in the Sustainability Science Program and based at Harvard’s Department of Organismic and Evolutionary Biology. He is implementing a large scale distributed hydrological model for the Tapajos River Basin in Brazil in conjunction with a coupled biosphere-atmosphere model to explore the implications of climate and land-use change for hydropower operations. Fábio is contributing to collaborative work with the Initiative on Sustainable Development in Amazonia: Land Use and the Hydrologic Cycle led by Professor Paul Moorcroft. Fábio holds a PhD in Water Resources Engineering from Lund University (2013) in Sweden. He received his master's degree in Water Resources Engineering from Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul (2010) and his bachelor's degree in Civil Engineering from Federal University of Alagoas (2008). His PhD thesis explored potential effects of the expansion of agricultural lands in the Amazon on the local hydrological cycle using environmental modeling. He was awarded an Erasmus Mundus scholarship to the Lund University (2010) and a doctoral studentship from the Crafoord Foundation (2012). He worked as a consultant and his projects included dredge impact and recovery assessment, water quality management, and preparation of environmental impact assessment reports.

Conceptual evaluation of surface hydrology in the Tapajos River Basin and implications of climate and land use changes for its hydropower operations
This research aims to understand the implications of climate and land-use change for hydropower operations of the Tapajos River Basin in Brazil. By implementing a large scale distributed hydrological model in conjunction with a coupled biosphere-atmosphere model, the research explores the implications of climate and land-use change for hydropower operations. An evaluation of short-, medium- and long-term changes in evapotranspiration, soil moisture, and surface runoff due to the replacement of native vegetation with agricultural lands and their implications for the hydropower in the Tapajos River Basin is expected as the outcome of this research.

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