Past Events

2014

Social and Urban Policy Area: Open House and Ice Cream Social

Tuesday, September 2, 2014

5:00 - 6:00 pm
Allison Dining Room, 5th Floor Taubman Building, Harvard Kennedy School, Cambridge

Come and celebrate the beginning of the new term and learn more about the Taubman Center for State and Local Government, the Malcolm Wiener Center for Social Policy, the Rappaport Institute for Greater Boston, and the Joint Center for Housing Studies and our respective programs, affiliated faculty and student activities.

This event is co-sponsored by the Taubman Center for State and Local Government, the Malcolm Wiener Center for Social Policy, the Rappaport Institute for Greater Boston and the Joint Center for Housing Studies who together support the Social and Urban Policy concentration.  

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Learning from Lawrence: Strategies for Turnaround Schools

Tuesday, June 10, 2014

5:30 - 7:30 pm
Bell Hall, 5th Floor Belfer Building, Harvard Kennedy School, Cambridge

Research Presentation by
Josh Goodman, Harvard Kennedy School
Beth Schueler, Harvard Graduate School of Education

Response and Discussion from
Seth Racine, Chief Redesign Officer, Lawrence Public Schools
Paul Reville, Francis Keppel Professor of Practice of Educational Policy and Administration, Harvard University Graduate School of Education

In 2011, Massachusetts took over the Lawrence Public Schools. The state instituted a variety of reforms, including Acceleration Academies, reassignment of teachers, and new district leadership. As the state examines the possibility of school and district turnarounds, what lessons can be learned from the Lawrence experience. Have the reforms worked? Which reforms appear to be more effective?

Co-sponsored by the Rappaport Institute for Greater Boston, the Taubman Center for State and Local Government, and the Collins Center for Public Management at UMass Boston.

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Has CitiStat Worked in Greater Boston

Thursday, June 5, 2014

8:30 am
UMass Campus Ballroom, UMass Boston, Boston

Mayor Joe Curtatone, City of Somerville
Mayor Kim Driscoll, City of Salem
Suzanne Kennedy, Town Administrator, Town of Medway
Moderated by Michael Ahn, Assistant Professor, Department of Public Policy and Affairs, McCormack Graduate School

CitiStat is a leadership strategy used by a growing number of governments across the nation. Following up a 2003 Rappaport Institute report titled "Can CitiStat Work in Greater Boston?", this forum will examine how CitiStat has been implemented in both small and large communities in Greater Boston in the last decade. The discussion will seek to draw lessons from the experience of different communities and provide a framework for deepening and broadening the use of performance management in municipalities.


Co-sponsored by the Rappaport Institute for Greater Boston, the Edward J. Collins, Jr. Center for Public Management at the John W. McCormack Graduate School of Policy and Global Studies, and the Taubman Center for State and Local Government.

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Not Just the Problems of Other People's Children

Tuesday, May 13, 2014
12:00 - 1:45pm
Center on Government and International Studies – South Room 050 (Lower Level)
1730 Cambridge Street, Cambridge, MA

Parental education has long been shown to be the best family background indicator of a student’s readiness to learn at school, and the United States’ comparatively low proficiency rates are often attributed to the large numbers of students who come from disadvantaged families, such as those where parents do not have a high school diploma.

Now a new study from researchers Eric Hanushek (Stanford University), Paul Peterson (Harvard University), and Ludger Woessmann (University of Munich) finds that U.S. schools do as badly at teaching those from better-educated families as they do at teaching those from less well-educated families.

These findings will be presented at an event on Tuesday, May 13, featuring the report’s co-author Paul E. Peterson. Joining the discussion will be Mitchell D. Chester, Massachusetts Commissioner of Elementary and Secondary Education. Moderated by Gerard Robinson, Vice President of Partnerships, UniversityNow.

Sponsored by Harvard University’s Program on Education Policy and Governance with Taubman Center for State and Local Government and Rappaport Institute for Greater Boston

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Enterprising Cities: Regulatory Climate Index 2014

Monday, May 12, 2014
10:00 - 11:30am
Wiener Auditorium, Harvard Kennedy School

The U.S. Chamber of Commerce Foundation’s 2014 Enterprising Cities: Regulatory Climate Index assesses five areas of business regulation that a typical small business encounters in order to open and operate in 10 major cities across the United States. The results are a barometer for the overall business environment and point to areas where reform is needed.
The Foundation will present the report’s findings, followed by a panel discussion on what they mean for doing business.

Remarks by: Edward Glaeser, Ph.D., Fred and Eleanor Glimp Professor of Economics, Harvard University
Featured speaker and panelist: The Honorable John R. McKernan Jr., Senior Adviser to the President and CEO, U.S. Chamber of Commerce; President, U.S. Chamber of Commerce Foundation
Presentation by: Michael Hendrix, Director, Emerging Issues & Research, U.S. Chamber of Commerce Foundation
Panelists include:
George A. Ramirez, Executive Vice President, MassDevelopment - Devens
Michelle Wu, Boston City Councilor At-Large

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Ending the Zero-Sum Game: Regionalizing Economic Development

Monday, April 28, 2014
8:30 am - 10:00 am
Alcott Room, Omni Parker House, 60 School Street, Boston

Joe Curtatone, Mayor of Somerville
John Barros, Chief, City of Boston Economic Development Cabinet
Edward Glaeser, Glimp Professor of Economics, Harvard University and Director, Rappaport Institute and Taubman Center for State and Local Government
Moderated by Shirley Yeung, Business Columnist, Boston Globe

The economy of Greater Boston has tremendous strengths and attracts businesses from around the world. Yet there is very little coordination of resources and activities around economic development among the municipalities that make up Greater Boston. In fact, many times they compete against each other for relocating firms. What would regional economic development look like and what structure would make it viable and durable?


Co-sponsored by Rappaport Institute for Greater Boston, The Taubman Center for State and Local Government, and the Collins Center for Public Management at UMass Boston.

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Opening the Gates of Opportunity: Realizing the Potential of Gateway Cities in Massachusetts

Friday, April 18, 2014

1:00 pm - 5:30 pm
Harvard Graduate School of Design


Gateway Cities are midsize urban centers in Massachusetts facing stubborn social and economic challenges, but with many assets that have unrealized potential. Our half-day event, Opening the Gates of Opportunity: Realizing the Potential of Gateway Cities, will bring together community leaders, public officials, policymakers, faculty and students to exchange ideas and information about workable solutions for cities and local economies. The agenda will feature speakers who represent a cross-section of new ideas for revitalizing our cities and neighborhoods. Out of these discussions we hope to capture innovative, cross-sector, collaborative ideas and models that will feed into the work that is being done by students and faculty in urban planning.

Sponsored by the Harvard Graduate School of Design and the Federal Reserve Bank of Boston. Co-sponsored by the Boston Area Research Initiative, CHAPA (Citizens' Housing and Planning Association), MACDC (Massachusetts Association or Community Development Corporations), MassInc, Rappaport Institute for Greater Boston, and Taubman Center for State and Local Government

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The Impact of Teacher Skills on Student Performance Across Countries

Wednesday, April 16, 2014

12:00 pm - 1:30 pm
Center for Government and International Studies
Room K-450, Harvard University CGIS Knafel (North) Building, 1737 Cambridge Street, Cambridge, MA

Dr. Marc Piopiunik-PEPG Post-Doctoral Fellow and Ifo Institute

Student performance differs greatly across countries, but little is known about the role of teacher quality in explaining these differences. New international data from the PIAAC survey of adult skills allow for the first time to quantify teacher skills in numeracy and literacy, providing country-level measures of teacher subject knowledge. Student-level regressions with PISA data exploit between-subject variation to overcome bias from unobserved country heterogeneity and control for parent skills to account for the persistence of skills across generations.

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2013

Town Hall Meeting with Boston Mayor-elect Martin Walsh

Saturday, December 14, 2013

10:00 am - 5:00 pm
Reggie Lewis Center at Roxbury Community College, 1350 Tremont Street, Boston


The Rappaport Institute for Greater Boston has been asked by the Martin J. Walsh transition team to help facilitate a Boston-wide town hall meeting with Mayor-Elect Martin Walsh. This day long event will take place at Roxbury Community College on Saturday, December 14. Attendees may attend one morning and one afternoon breakout session with the Walsh transition team leaders to talk about important policy issues.

Agenda

10:00 a.m. Welcome by Valerie Roberson, President, Roxbury Community College
10:10 a.m. Opening Remarks by Mayor-Elect Martin Walsh, City of Boston
10:30 a.m. Keynote Remarks & Subcommittee Instructions by Edward Glaeser, Fred and Eleanor Glimp Professor of Economics, Harvard University and Director, Rappaport Institute for Greater Boston

11:00 - 12:15 p.m. BREAKOUT SESSION I

12:30 - 1:15 p.m. Lunch

1:30 - 2:45 p.m. BREAKOUT SESSION II

4:00 P.M. Open Q&A moderated by Edward Glaeser, Fred and Eleanor Glimp Professor of Economics and Director, Rappaport Institute for Greater Boston, Harvard University, Moderator
4:40 P.M. Closing Remarks by Mayor-Elect Martin Walsh, City of Boston

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A Mayor's Perspective on Disaster Response: Mayor Walter Maddox on the 2011 Tuscaloosa, Alabama Tornado

Wednesday, December 4, 2013

4:15 pm
Room 226 (Conference Room), Ash Center, Suite 200 North, 124 Mt. Auburn Street, Cambridge, MA


Join us for a conversation with Mayor Walter Maddox of Tuscaloosa, Alabama, who will speak about his city’s response to an EF4 tornado that hit on April 27, 2011.  Despite leveling an eighth of the city, killing 53 people, and destroying or seriously damaging thousands of structures, the devastation could have been far greater had it not been for the mayor’s decision to revamp the city’s emergency management system in the years preceding the storm.  During his talk, Mayor Maddox will discuss this reform and how he led the response to the storm, providing insight into the role political leaders can play in preparing for and responding to disasters.

Sponsored by the Program on Crisis Leadership, Ash Center and Taubman Center, Harvard Kennedy School

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Typhoon Haiyan: Response and Recovery in the Philippines
Thursday, November 21, 2013
12:00 – 2:00 pm

CGIS South, Room S020, 1730 Cambridge Street

In this panel discussion, speakers will explore the enormous challenges of providing relief and organizing recovery in the aftermath of Typhoon Haiyan. Panelists include:

* Doug Ahlers, Adjunct Lecturer in Public Policy, Harvard Kennedy School;
* Mai Mislang, former Assistant Secretary/Chief of Staff of the Presidential Communications Development and Strategic Planning Office for President Aquino (and HKS mid-career student);
* Tori Stephens, former Peace Corps volunteer in the mayor’s office of Guiuan, a town in the impacted area of the Philippines (and HKS MPP student);
* Michael vanRooyen, Director of the Harvard Humanitarian Initiative.

Moderated by Arn Howitt, Executive Director of the Ash Center for Democratic Governance and Innovation and Faculty Co-Director of the Program on Crisis Leadership.

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Planes, Trains and Automobiles (and Bikes)

Transportation and the New Generation: Is the Driving Boom Over?

Wednesday, November 20
4:30 – 6:00 pm
Taubman 401, 4th floor Taubman Building, 15 Eliot Street

This session of PTAB features U.S. PIRG Senior Analyst Phineas Baxandall and Frontier Group Senior Policy Analyst Tony Dutzik, who will talk about the implications of changing driving trends in the United States.  For decards, public officials and transportation planners have assumed that the number of miles driven can go in only one direction - up.  Nearly a decade of stagnating vehicle travel in the U.S., the arrival of a Millennial generation more open to urban and car-light lifestyles, and an explosion of new technology-enabled transportation choices are forcing a reexamination of this assumption.  Is this an opportunity to rethink our transportation priorities in fundamental ways?

Phineas was Assistant Director at the Kennedy School's Rappaport Institute before joining U.S. PIRG Education Fund in 2006.  He taught political economy for eight years at Harvard's Social Studies program.

Tony has spent the past 12 years as a policy analyst with Frontier Group, a non-profit multi-issue policy think tank, where he has written extensively on transportation, energy, global warming and other issues.

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Planes, Trains and Automobiles (and Bikes)
Living Car-Light

Wednesday, Oct. 30 at 4:30 p.m.

Jackie Douglas, Executive Director of LivableStreets Alliance, a Boston-based organization rethinking urban transportation to create safe streets and vibrant public spaces, will be sharing her thoughts about "living car-light." While Boston’s population and square footage of development is increasing, car registrations are decreasing. What does this trend mean for mobility and accessibility? Jackie will talk about the challenges and opportunities we face not just in Boston, but in urban areas around the world.

Jackie joined LivableStreets in January 2008 and became Executive Director in March 2012. Her interest in transportation began as a child after living in the Netherlands where she and her family cycled everywhere. In 2011, Jackie was awarded National Advocate of the Year by the Alliance for Biking & Walking. She graduated from Boston University in 2008 with a self-designed major to study the forces that shape people, looking at factors such as cognitive development and genetics, public policy, and the built environment.

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Planes, Trains, Automobiles (and Bikes):
Conversation with Tom Glynn of Massport

Wednesday, Oct. 9 at 4:30 p.m.
Allison Dining Room, 5th floor, Taubman Building, 15 Eliot Street

Tom Glynn, Chief Executive Officer and Executive Director, MassPort

Tom will be speaking about the shared growth dynamics of Logan Airport and the Boston metro area.

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The Boston Mayoral Preliminary: The Results are In

Wednesday, September 25
12:00 p.m.

Institute of Politics Conference Room 166
1st floor Littauer Building, 79 John F. Kennedy Street

A discussion with:

Rep. Jeffrey Sanchez
House Chair, Joint Committee on Public Health
Massachusetts House of Representatives

Jim O'Sullivan
Political Reporter,
The Boston Globe and Boston.com

Steve Poftak

Executive Director,
Rappaport Institute for Greater Boston, Harvard Kennedy School

Co-sponsered by the Rappaport Institute for Greater Boston and the Institute of Politics

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The Metropolitan Revolution: How Cities and Metros are Fixing Our Broken Politics and Fragile Economy

Wednesday, September 25, 2013
7:00 pm

Starr Auditorium, Belfer Building, Corner of John F. Kennedy and Eliot Streets

Bruce Katz
, Vice President, Brookings Institution, and Director, Metropolitan Policy Program

Join us for a conversation with Bruce Katz, co-author of the new book The Metropolitan Revolution: How Cities and Metros are Fixing Our Broken Politics and Fragile Economy. Bruce is a vice president at the Brookings Institution and founding director of the Brookings Metropolitan Policy Program. His new book (co-authored with Jennifer Bradley) is a distillation of his work on the emerging metropolitan-led "next economy" and its practitioners around the country working to produce more and better jobs driven by innovation, exports and sustainability.

Co-sponsored by The Rappaport Institute for Greater Boston, the Taubman Center for State and Local Government, the Boston Area Research Initiative, and the Joint Center for Housing Studies.

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From Queens to Hong Kong:
More Than Just a Train Ride

Gustav Pollok Lecture on Research in Government
Thursday, September 19, 2013 at 6:00 p.m.
Harvard Kennedy School Forum, 1st floor of the Littauer Building, 79 John F. Kennedy Street, Cambridge, Massachusetts

Jay Walder, Chief Executive Officer, MTR Corporation, Hong Kong and MPP 1983

Walder was instrumental in overhauling mass transit systems in New York City and London and today leads MTR (Mass Transit Railway), Hong Kong's commuter and intercity rail services. Before joining MTR, he was the Chairman and Chief Executive Officer of the Metropolitan Transportation Authority (MTA) in New York, the largest transit agency in the United States. Until 2007, Walder was the Managing Director for Finance and Planning at Transport for London.

The Gustav Pollok Lecture on Research in Government was established in memory of noted journalist and author Gustav Pollok. This lecture seeks to stimulate interest in government careers by providing an opportunity for public officials and researchers to discuss their work with a view to building better government.

Co-sponsored by The Harvard Kennedy School's Taubman Center for State and Local Government, The Rappaport Institute for Greater Boston and the Institute for Politics.

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Innovative Finance: Creative Options to Fund Transportation in Massachusetts

Wednesday, February 20 at 5:30pm
Nye A, 5th Floor, Taubman Building, 15 Eliot Street

With Dana Levenson, Chief Financial Officer, Massachusetts Department of Transportation (MassDOT)

Transportation funding is a hot topic in Massachusetts as the legislature reviews a dramatic funding proposal from the governor. While the current discussion focuses on many traditional sources of revenue, other innovative options exist. In his role as MassDOT CFO and drawing on his past experience, Dana Levenson will discuss other transportation financing options and their potential in Massachusetts. Levenson is the former managing director and head of infrastructure banking for Americas for The Royal Bank of Scotland (RBS) and served previously as the City of Chicago’s chief financial officer. In that role, he had oversight of the city comptroller's office and the departments of budget and management, procurement services, and revenue. Levenson was responsible for the long-term leases of both the Chicago Skyway for $1.83 billion in 2005 and the Chicago Downtown Parking System in 2006 for $563 million. Levenson previously served as a managing director with Bank One and Bank of America. He received his bachelor's degree in European history from Brown University and his MBA from New York University.

This event is co-sponsored by the Rappaport Institute for Greater Boston.

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Staying on Track: Addressing The MBTA’s Fiscal and Operational Challenges

Wednesday, February 13 at 5:30pm

Nye A, 5th Floor, Taubman Building, 15 Eliot Street

With Dr. Beverly Scott, General Manager, Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority (MBTA)

The MBTA serves over 1.2 million riders every day over multiple transportation modes and operates with a budget of $1.65 billion dollars. Within the context of constant fiscal pressure and long-term underinvestment in transportation maintenance, keeping the MBTA running is a challenge. The woman responsible for meeting that challenge is Beverly Scott, the incoming General Manager of the MBTA. Prior to coming to the MBTA, Dr. Scott served as Chief Executive Officer/ General Manager of the Metropolitan Atlanta Rapid Transit Authority (MARTA). Previously, she served as general manager and chief executive officer of the Sacramento Regional Transit District (SRTD), and served as the general manager of the Rhode Island Public Transit Authority (RIPTA), one of four statewide public transit systems in the United States. She has held senior level positions at the New York Metropolitan Transportation Authority (MTA), New Jersey Transit Corporation (NJT), the Washington Metropolitan Transportation Authority (WMATA), and Dallas Area Rapid Transit (DART). Dr. Scott holds a doctorate in political science, with a specialization in public administration, from Howard University, and a Bachelor of Arts in Political Science from Fisk University.

This event is co-sponsored by the Rappaport Institute for Greater Boston.


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Do We Need Vouchers in School Accountability Systems? Evidence from a Court Induced Chance in Florida's A+ Accountability Plan

Wednesday, March 6 at 12:00pm
Room 262, CGIS North/Knafel Building, 1737 Cambridge Street

With Benedikt Siegler, Ifo Institute

In 2006, the Florida Supreme Court ended the state funded voucher program which allowed students of failing public schools to transfer to a private school. This provided a unique research opportunity to disentangle the individual incentive effects of different parts of hte sanction scheme of the Florida school accountability system. Using administrative student-level data from Florida and a difference-in-discontinuities approach, Siegler analyzes whether the reduction in sanction threats led failing schools to lower their effort in raising educational performance.

Please RSVP to pepg@fas.harvard.edu to attend this event.

This event is sponsored by the Program on Education Policy and Governance

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Taking the Car Out of Carbon: Sustainability Notes from the MTA

Wednesday, March 6 at 5:30pm
Nye A, 5th Floor, Taubman Buliding, 15 Eliot Street

With Projjal Dutta, Director, Sustainability Initiatives, New York Metropolitan Transportation Authority (MTA)

Commentary by Andrew Brennan, Director of Environmental Affairs, Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority (MBTA)

How can riding the subway make cities greener? Projjal Dutta, Director of Sustainability Initiatives for New York's MTA will explain how things such as "humped-tracks" train stations, reducing the weight of subway cars, and lowering electricity consumption can make considerable impacts on carbon emission. Andrew Brennan, Director of Environmental Affairs for the MBTA will highlight the MBTA's approach to reducing carbon emissions.

For more information about this event, please contact Polly O'Brien at polly@rappaportinstitute.org.

This event is co-sponsored by the Rappaport Institute for Greater Boston, the Environmental and Natural Resources Program, and the Social and Urban Policy Professional Interest Council at Harvard Kennedy School

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Massachusetts in Washington: New Faces, Weakened Clout?

Wednesday, March 27 at 12:00pm
Room 166, Institute of Politics, Littauer Building, 79 John F. Kennedy Street

With Jim O'Sullivan, Online Politics Editor, Boston Globe

Jim O'Sullivan is the Boston Globe's incoming online politics editor and writes the Political Intelligence blog. He is the former White House Correspondent for the National Journal. Previously, he worked at State House News Service and the Dorchester Reporter. O'Sullivan will draw on his experience in both Washington and Boston to examine the changes in the state's delegation and how that impacts its influence within the context of the current political climate. Additionally, he'll discuss how Massachusetts has been a harbinger in recent years for national trends, both political and policy-related.

For more information about this event, please contact Polly O'Brien at polly@rappaportinstitute.org.

This event is co-sponsored by the Rappaport Institute for Greater Boston, the Institute of Politics, and the Joan Shorenstein Center on the Press, Politics and Public Policy.

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A Conversation with David Vitale

Thursday, April 25 at 12:00pm
Bell Hall, 5th Floor, Belfer Building, Corner of JFK and Eliot Streets

With David Vitale, Board Chair, Chicago Public Schools

The event is part of the PEPG Education Policy Colloquia Series and is free to all in the Harvard community. Please RSVP to pepg@fas.harvard.edu.

A light lunch will be provided.

The Education Policy Colloquia Series is presented by the Program on Education Policy and Governance affiliated with the Taubman Center for State and Local Government, and the Department of Government, Harvard University. The series is co-sponsored by the Harvard Graduate School of Education.

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Implementing PerformanceStat: Lessons from the Field


Thursday, April 25 at 12:00pm
Weil Town Hall, Belfer Building, Corner of JFK and Eliot Streets

With Mayor Joseph Curtatone of Somerville
John Mattingly, former commissioner of the New York City Administration for Children's Services
Beth Blauer, former director of Maryland's StateStat

Moderated by Bob Behn, Lecturer in Public Policy, Harvard Kennedy School

"PerformanceStat" (aka Compstat or Citistat) has received considerable attention, nationally and at the Kennedy School. from public executives and policymakers interested in producing results by using data to analyze and motivate better performance. As with any promising leadership strategy, however, the challenge is implementation: How can leaders adapt PerformanceStat and make it work for their particular institution?

Come get an unvarnished look at the promise and the pitfalls of PerformanceStat from leaders with first-hand experience implementing it in their city, state, or agency.

Refreshmens will be served.

For more information about this event, please contact Polly O'Brien at polly@rappaportinstitute.org.

This event is cosponsored by the Kennedy School's Regional, State, Local and Tribal (RSLT) Governance PIC, the Ash Center for Democratic Governance and Innovation, and the Rappaport Institute for Greater Boston.

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Conference: Using Technology to Improve Transportation: All Electronic Tolling and Beyond

Tuesday, May 7 from 8:00am to 11:30am
1st Floor Function Room, Suffolk University Law School, 120 Tremont Street, Boston

Please join the Rappaport Institute for this multi-panel conference exploring the potential of new technologies to make transportation work more efficiently, faster, and safer.

Under investment has put pressure on transportation providers to improve service. Fiscal pressures have limited resources available to make those improvements. Technology offers the opportunity to leverage small investments by improving in customer service, enhancing operating efficiencies, and increasing revenue.

Keynote Speaker: Rich Davey, Massachusetts Secretary of Transportation

Panel 1: Improving the Customer Experience with Technology

Kirk Steudle, State Transportation Director, Michigan Department of Transportation
Jon Davis, Chief Financial Officer, MBTA
Mary Jane O'Meara, Associate Vice President, HNTB

Moderated by David St. Amant, President, Econolite; incoming Chair, ITS America

Panel 2: Perils, Pitfalls, and Payoffs from All Electronic Tolling

Pat Jones, Executive Director, International Bridge Tunnel and Turnpike Association
Mike Heiligenstein, Executive Director, Central Texas Regional Mobility Authority
Christopher M. Waszczuk, Administrator, New Hampshire Bureau of Turnpikes

Moderated by George Campbell, former NH Department of Transportation Commissioner; former Maine Department of Transportation Commissioner

For more information about this conference, please contact Polly O'Brien at polly@rappaportinstitute.org

This conference is cosponsored by the Center for Strategic Studies (Northeaster University D'Amore-Kim School of Business), the Rappaport Center for Law and Public Service (Suffolk University Law School), and the Rappaport Institute for Greater Boston.

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Start-Up City: Building Boston's Entrepreneurial Ecosystem

Tuesday, June 11 from 8:00a to 11:30a
MassChallenge Event Space, 1 Marina Park Drive, 14th Floor, Boston

Registration to the conference is required.

Introduction: Nichole Fichera and Chloe Ryan, City of Boston

Keynote: Mayor Thomas M. Menino, City of Boston

Opening Address: "Boston's Vision for Innovation" by Kairos Shen, Chief Planner, Boston Redevelopment Authority


Presentations:
Ed Glaeser, Fred and Eleanor Glimp Professor of Economics, Harvard University and Director, Rappaport Institute for Greater Boston

Scott Griffith, Former CEO and Founder, Zipcar

Jennifer Lum, Co-Founder, Adelphic Mobile


Panel Discussion: Making the Most of Boston's Human Capital

With Nigel Jacob, Co-chair, Mayor's Office of New Urban Mechanics
Jeffrey Bussgang, General Partner, Flybridge Partners
Carlos Martinez Vela, Executive Director, Venture Cafe Foundation

Moderated by Sarah Green, Senior Associate Editor, Harvard Business Review

For more information about this conference, please contact polly@rappaportinstitute.org.

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Who Do You Call? Communication Around the Boston Marathon Bombing

Wednesday, July 31 at 12:00pm
Nye A, 5th Floor, Taubman Building, 15 Eliot Street

With David Lazer, Professor of Political Science and Computer Information Science, Northeastern University; Co-Director, NULab for Texts, Maps, and Networks; Director, Program on Networked Governance, Harvard University

How do we communicate after an emergency event in our community? Understanding how people get information and communicate with one another is critical in emergency response. Here we offer an initial exploration of data collected regarding the aftermath of the Boston Marathon bombing. We will discuss findings from two data sources: a paired national and Massachusetts survey regarding media use the day of the bombing, and a first of its kind smartphone survey examining calling behavior in the nine hours after the bombing.


For more information or to RSVP to this event, please contact Heather Marie Vitale at heather_marie_vitale@hks.harvard.edu.

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2012

Using Historic Preservation to Foster Community Development: Lessons and Issues from Historic Boston, Inc.’s New Focus on Boston’s Neighborhoods

Tuesday, February 21 at 5:30 p.m.
Bell Hall, 5th floor, Belfer Building, Corner of John F. Kennedy and Eliot Streets

Presentation by Kathy Kottaridis, Executive Director, Historic Boston, Inc.; former Rappaport Urban Scholar; and Rappaport Institute Advisory Board member

Commentary by Matthew Kiefer, Chair of Historic Boston, Inc’s Board of Directors; partner, Goulston and Storrs; and Lecturer in Urban Planning and Design, Harvard Graduate School of Design

Alexander von Hoffman, Senior Research Fellow, Joint Center for Housing Studies and author, House by House, Block by Block: The Rebirth of America’s Urban Neighborhoods

Cosponsored by the Rappaport Institute for Greater Boston and the Joint Center for Housing Studies


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Do Borrower Rights Improve Borrower Outcomes?
Evidence from the Foreclosure Process


Tuesday, February 28 at 5:30 p.m.
Allison Dining Room, 5th floor, Taubman Building, 15 Eliot Street

Presentation by Paul Willen, Senior Economist and Policy Advisor, Research Department, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston

Commentary by Sheila Dillon, Housing Advisor to Boston Mayor Thomas M. Menino

Cosponsored by the Rappaport Institute for Greater Boston and the Joint Center for Housing Studies


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The Road to a National Curriculum: The Legal Aspects of the Common Core Standards, Race to the Top, and Conditional Wavers

Wednesday, February 29 at 12:00pm
Room S-050, CGIS South Building, Concourse Level, 1730 Cambridge Street

With Robert S. Eitel, Founding Member, Talbert & Eitel, PLLC

This event is sponsored by the Program on Education Policy and Governance


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Principal Effectiveness: Aligning Evaluation, Accountability, and Support

Wednesday, March 7 at 12:00pm
Room 308, Longfellow Hall, Graduate School of Education, 13 Appian Way

With John Kim, William Henry Bloomberg Fellow, Harvard Business School

This event will provide an overview of the topic of principal effectiveness and evaluation practices nationwide, as well as varying perceptions of the role of the principal and the importance of aligning a principal's role to the district's theory of action. The focus will be on key leadership and managerial tactics school districts can use to implement systematic approaches to improve principal effectiveness. The emphasis is on aligning diverse functions, systems and data to improve overall management and coordination of principal effectiveness components, including evaluations.

This event is sponsored by the Program on Education Policy and Governance


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The Long-Term Impacts of Teachers:
Teacher Value-Added and Student Outcomes in Adulthood

Tuesday, April 3 at 5:30 p.m.
Allison Dining Room, 5th floor, Taubman Building, 15 Eliot Street

Presentation by John Friedman, Associate Professor of Public Policy, Harvard Kennedy School and Raj Chetty, Professor of Economics, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Harvard University

Commentary by Thomas Payzant, Professor of Practice, Harvard Graduate School of Education and former Superintendent, Boston Public Schools

Cosponsored by the Rappaport Institute for Greater Boston and the Program on Education Policy and Governance


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Flaking Out: Snowfall, Disruptions of Instructional Time and Student Achievement

Wednesday, April 4 at 12:00pm
Knafel 262, CGIS North Building (Knafel), 1737 Cambridge Street

With Joshua Goodman, Assistant Professor of Public Policy, Harvard Kennedy School

Recent research on charter schools, summer learning loss, and international achievement suggests that instructional time is a critical input to the education production function. Using student and school-grade fixed effects models with data from Massachusetts, there is no found relation between school closures and achievement, but a strong relation between student absences and achievement.

Extreme snowfall induces school closures but does not affect student achievement. Moderate snowfall induces student absences and does reduce achievement. These results are consistent with a model of instruction in which coordination of students is the central challenge. Teachers deal well with coordinated disruptions of instructional time like school closures, but deal poorly with absences that affect different students and different times. These estimates suggest that absences are responsible for up to 20% of the achievement gap between poor and non-poor students. They also suggest that policies designed solely to increase instructional time may not be effectice.

This event is sponsored by the Program on Education Policy and Governance

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President Nixon and the Segregated Southern School

Wednesday, April 11 at 12:00pm
Room S-050, CGIS South Building, Concourse Level, 1730 Cambridge Street

With Gerard Alexander, Associate Professor, Woodrow Wilson Department of Politics, University of Virginia

Fully dual school systems in the South were largely ended in 1969-70. Many accounts attribute the end of formal school desegregation to a Supreme Court frustrated by delay and determined to authoritatively intervene in the matter. But a close examination suggests the Court's impact heavily depended on the Executive branch's enforcement decisions, and highlights an unusual strategy that Richard Nixon pursued outside the normal policy process to end decisions, and Nixon's posture in race-related policies.

This event is sponsored by the Program on Education Policy and Governance

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Community-Powered Disaster Recovery: A Brownbag Presentation by Recovers.org


Tuesday, April 17 at 12:00pm
Taubman 301, 3rd Floor, Taubman Building, 15 Eliot Street

Moderated by Arnold Howitt, Executive Director, Ash Center for Democratic Governance & Innovation, and Faculty Co-Director, Program on Crisis Leadership

Created in the wake of an EF3 tornado, Recovers.org provides free software and support to recovering areas immediately after a disaster. In this brownbag presentation, the organization's co-founders will discuss how the services they provide allow towns to capture the goodwill of people and turn it into action amidst the chaos that frequently characterizes early relief and recovery efforts.

They will speak about their motivations for creating the organization - and the successes and challenges they've experienced navigating the non-profit, for profit and teach start-up scenes.

Sponsored by the Program on Crisis Leadership.

For more information about this event, please contact David Giles at david_giles@harvard.edu.


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Great American City: A Panel Discussion

Monday, April 30 at 4:00pm
Starr Auditorium, Belfer Building, Corner of JFK and Eliot Streets

Featuring Robert Sampson, Henry Ford II Professor of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology, Harvard University

With discussion from:

Edward Davis, Commissioner, Boston Police Department
Kathryn Edin, Professor of Public Policy and Management, Harvard Kennedy School
Edward Glaeser, Fred and Eleanor Glimp Professor of Economics and Director, The Rappaport Institute for Greater Boston and The Taubman Center for State and Local Government
Thomas Sugrue, David Boies Professor of History and Sociology, University of Pennsylvania

Moderated by William Julius Wilson, Lewis P. and Linda L. Geyser University Professor, Harvard University

The panel will be discussing Robert Sampson's new book, Great American City: Chicago and the Enduring Neighborhood Effect.

This event is co-sponsored by: FAS Department of Sociology, Joblessness and Urban Poverty Program, Multidisciplinary Program in Inequality and Social Policy, Program in Criminal Justice Policy and Management, Rappaport Institute for Greater Boston, and The Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Research.

For more information about this event, please contact Polly O'Brien at polly@rappaportinstitute.org.


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WEBINAR: Is the United States Catching Up? International and State Trends in Student Achievement

Tuesday, July 24 from 12:30-1:45pm (EST)

Join the Program on Education Policy and Governance (PEPG) for a webinar to discuss a forthcoming report that provides new information on the places in the United States and around the world which have shown the greatest improvement on PISA and NAEP tests over the past two decades.

In concurrence with the report's release, this webinar will feature two of the report's authors who will present a summary of the findings and then take questions from the audience.

Report authors Paul E. Peterson (Harvard University) and Eric A. Hanushek (Hoover Institution and Stanford University) will present the webinar. The report was also authored by Ludger Woessmann (University of Munich).

REGISTRATION IS REQUIRED FOR THIS FREE WEBINAR: http://bit.ly/LIcwAx

Presented by the Program on Education Policy and Governance

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Taubman Summer Series: Isolated Capital Cities, Accountability and Corruption: Evidence from US States

Wednesday, July 25 at 12:00pm
Allison Dining Room, 5th floor, Taubman Building, 15 Eliot Street

With Filipe Campante, Associate Professor of Public Policy

A recent study of US states has shown that capital cities surrounded by a smaller population are associated with greater levels of corruption. These isolated capital cities also have less media coverage of and lower voter turnout for state elections, impairing two important tools for holding state politicians accountable. The study also gave evidence that state politicians tend to get more money from campaign contributions in states with isolated capitals, implying that money, not the good of the citizens, shapes political outcomes. Join the Taubman Center's Summer Series to learn more.

For more information or to RSVP to this event, please contact Heather Marie Vitale at heather_marie_vitale@hks.harvard.edu.

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The Employment Impacts of the 2010 Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill and Offshore Oil Drilling Moratorium

Wednesday, August 1 at 12:00pm
Allison Dining Room, 5th floor, Taubman Building, 15 Eliot Street

With Joe Aldy, Associate Professor of Public Policy

On April 20, 2010, the Transocean Deepwater Horizon suffered a catastrophic blowout while drilling in the Gulf of Mexico and resulted in the largest oil spill in U.S. history. In response to the spill, the U.S. Department of the Interior suspended offshore deep water oil and gas drilling operations. The media portrayed these events as adversely impacting local employment, with images of out-of-work fishermen and rig workers. The unprecedented mobilization and spill response resources, the BP compensation fund, and the rig workers relief fund all provided employment and income to counter the adverse effects. Join Professor Aldy to discover how the oil spill and the drilling moratorium affected employment in the Gulf Coast.

A light lunch will be served.

For more information or to RSVP to this event, please contact Heather Marie Vitale at heather_marie_vitale@hks.harvard.edu.

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Social and Urban Policy Open House and Ice Cream Social
Meet faculty and program administrators from The Taubman Center, Wiener Center, Rappaport Institute and Joint Center for Housing

Wednesday, September 19 at 5:00pm
Allison Dining Room, 5th floor, Taubman Building, 15 Eliot Street

Come and celebrate the beginning of the new term and learn more about the Taubman Center for State and Local Government, the Malcolm Wiener Center for Social Policy, the Rappaport Institute for Greater Boston, and the Joint Center for Housing Studies and our respective programs, affiliated faculty and student activities.

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High-Speed Rail in Texas: Designing a System for a Car-Centric State
From the Planes, Trains and Automobiles (and Bikes) seminar series

Wednesday, September 19 at 4:00pm
Room 401, Taubman Building, 15 Eliot Street

With Seth Moulton, Managing Director, Lone Star High-Speed Rail

Texas Central Railway is a U.S. company organized to market and deploy Central Japan Railway Company's "bullet" train system and technology in Texas. The particular Texas project is a 200mph high-speed line between Dallas/Fort Worth and Houston. Why is a corridor that was not on President Obama's target HSR list attracting private-sector capital? And how does one design a high-speed rail system for a place where people have a love affair with their cars? Moulton, managing director of LSHSR, will talk about the opportunities and challenges for high-speed rail in the Lone Star State.

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The Effects of School Vouchers on College Enrollment: Experimental Evidence from New York City

Monday, September 24 at 12:00pm
Room 250, CGIS South Building, 1730 Cambridge Street

With Matt Chingos, Brown Center on Education, The Brookings Institution

In the first study, using a randomized experiment to measure the impact of school vouchers on college enrollment, Matthew Chingos and Paul Peterson, professor of government at Harvard University, examine the college-going behavior through 2011 of students who participated in a voucher experiment as elementary students in the late 90s. They find no overall impacts on college enrollment but do find large, statistically significant positive impacts on the college attending of African-American students who participated in the study.

This event is sponsored by the Program on Education Policy and Governance

For more information about this event, please contact PEPG_Administrator@hks.harvard.edu.

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Flying Cars...Really!
From the Planes, Trains and Automobiles (and Bikes) seminar series

Wednesday, September 26 at 4:30pm
Room 401, Taubman Building, 15 Eliot Street

With Carl Dietrich, CEO/CTO and co-founder of Terrafugia

Carl Dietrich will lead a discussion about the "why" and "how" of flying carsreally! Carl will tell the story of Terrafugia and discuss the vision for a practical shift toward a world with fewer traffic headaches and security lines--a would where you can keep your personal plug-in hybrid-electric flying car in your garage and use it instead of a normal car. He will bring this lofty subject "down to earth" with a discussion of the practical challenges from a technical, regulatory and business planning perspective. Terrafugia was recently featured in Boston Globe Magazine.

For more information about this event or the seminar series, please contact John Foote at john_foote@hks.harvard.edu.

Back to Top Your Phone is Your Ticket: Mobile Innovation at the MBTA
From the Planes, Trains and Automobiles (and Bikes) seminar series

Wednesday, October 10 at 4:30pm
Room 401, Taubman Building, 15 Eliot Street

With Joshua Robin, Director of Innovation, MBTA

The MBTA faces significant long-term financial challenges and continuing demand for customer improvements. At the same time, the T has seen record ridership growth. The T has turned to the use of new technologies, allowing it to do more with less to meet these challenges.

Joshua Rabin will discuss two recent MBTA initiatives that have improved the customer experience at a low cost: open data and mobile ticketing. Its open data initiative the MBTA released trip planning and real-time service information to software developers, spurring the creation of dozens of applications to answer the question, “Where is the T?” The mobile ticketing initiative, set to launch publicly later this year, will allow customers to purchase and use commuter rail tickets via their mobile phones. These two projects represent the new approach the MBTA has taken in allowing customers to, “bring their own” infrastructure as opposed to the agency installing costly and complex infrastructure of their own.

For more information about this event or the seminar series, please contact John Foote at john_foote@hks.harvard.edu.

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The Aftermath of Accelerating Algebra: Shedding Light on America's Math Problem

Monday, October 15 at 12:00pm
Room 050, Concourse Level, CGIS South Building, 1730 Cambridge Street

With Jacob Vigdor, Duke University

Ten years ago, two large school districts in North Carolina embarked on an initiative to move students into advanced math courses earlier in their career. The initiative, designed to improve the math skills of average to below-average students, backfired. Accelerated students performed significantly worse in the course and became significantly less likely to pass the complete set of courses required for admission to one of the state's four-year public colleges. The failed initiative helps to illustrate why, after more than a half-century of interventions, American students lag behind their peers in a range of developed and developing nations.

This event is sponsored by the Program on Education Policy and Governance

For more information on this event, or to RSVP, please contact pepg@fas.harvard.edu.

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Transparency for DOT: Who Measures Up?
From the Planes, Trains and Automobiles (and Bikes) seminar series

Wednesday, October 17 at 4:30pm
Allison Dining Room, 5th Floor, Taubman Building, 15 Eliot Street

With Steve Poftak, Executive Director, Rappaport Institute for Greater Boston

Performance measurement and transparency are the new buzzwords for the public sector but what are state departments of transportation really doing about it? We will examine the fundamental reasons for transparency and examine some examples of good and bad execution of performance measurement by state DOTs.

This event is co-sponsored by the Rappaport Institute for Greater Boston

For more information about this event or the seminar series, please contact John Foote at john_foote@hks.harvard.edu.

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The Wheels on the Bus: Decisions and Lessons from the Bus Routes of the Boston Public Schools
From the Planes, Trains and Automobiles (and Bikes) seminar series

Wednesday, October 24 at 4:30pm
Allison Dining Room, 5th Floor, Taubman Building, 15 Eliot Street

With Carl Allen (HKS '10), Director of Transportation, Boston Public Schools

Carl will be speaking about the challenges managing a large urban school transportation system in a highly complex and political environment. Boston Public Schools (BPS) serves over 220 public, private, and charter schools in the Boston area with yellow bus service--transporting over 32,000 students every day. 750 city-owned buses run 3,800 trips per day, traveling nine million miles each year. Boston's extensive school transportation system has been the subject of much public scrutiny over the past several years, as operational challenges and poor on-time performance frustrated schools and families; and now "busing" is the center of a city-wide debate over a new student assignment plan. Learn what Carl and BPS are doing to mitigate the scheduling headaches.

This event is co-sponsored by the Rappaport Institute for Greater Boston

For more information about this event or the seminar series, please contact John Foote at john_foote@hks.harvard.edu.

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Selecting Growth Measures for School and Teacher Evaluations

Wednesday, October 31 at 12:00pm
Room 250, CGIS South Building, 1730 Cambridge Street

With Cory Koedel, University of Missouri

The specifics of how growth models should be constructed and used to evaluate schools and teachers is a topic of lively policy debate in states and school districts nationwide. In this paper we take up the question of model choice and examine three competing approaches. The first approach, reflected in the popular student growth percentiles (SGPs) framework, eschews all controls for student covariates and schooling environments. The second approach, typically associated with value-added models (VAMs), controls for student background characteristics and aims to identify the causal effects of schools and teachers. The third approach, also VAM-based, fully levels the playing fiend so that the correlation between school- and teacher-level growth measures and student demographics is essentially zero. Koedel argues that the third approach is the most desirable for use in education evaluation systems. Our case rests on personnel economics, incentive-design theory, and the potential role that growth measures can play in improving instruction in K-12 schools.

This event is sponsored by the Program on Education Policy and Governance

For more information about this event, please contact PEPG_Administrator@hks.harvard.edu.

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Who's Afraid of Livable Streets?
From the Planes, Trains and Automobiles (and Bikes) seminar series... Halloween edition!


Wednesday, October 31 at 4:30pm
Room 401, Taubman Building, 15 Eliot Street

With Paul White, Executive Director of Transportation Alternatives, and Aaron Naparstek, Founder of Streetsblog

Cities around the world are reversing decades of automobile-oriented planning and policy and redesigning streets to prioritize the needs of pedestrians, cyclists and transit riders. Yet, despite successful efforts and a growing body of evidence of economic, public health and environmental benefits, political opposition to Livable Streets is deeply entrenched and difficult to overcome.

For the last ten years, Paul White and Aaron Naparstek have worked to bring transformative change to the streets of New York City. In this Halloween session they will explore the myths and realities of American urban planning and transportation policy and provide advocates with tools to frame the argument, scare away the Livable Streets bogeymen, and create change in their own communities.

For more information about this event or the seminar series, please contact John Foote at john_foote@hks.harvard.edu.

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Not Your Grandfather's RMV
From the Planes, Trains and Automobiles (and Bikes) seminar series

Wednesday, November 7 at 4:30pm
Room 401, Taubman Building, 15 Eliot Street

With Rachel Kaprielian, Registrar of Motor Vehicles, Massachusetts Department of Transportation and former Massachusetts State Representative (D-Watertown) and former Rappaport Boston Urban Scholar

Rachel Kaprielian is Massachusetts’ 17th Registrar of Motor Vehicles since her appointment in 2008 by Governor Deval Patrick. Her role carries the responsibility for the issuance of 4.6 million drivers’ licenses; registration of 5.8 million vehicles; administration of the vehicle inspection process; organization and collections of CRASH records; managing license suspensions and revocations; testing medical fitness for drivers and ensuring adherence to motor vehicle law. The RMV employs 800 people, has a budget of $63 million and runs thirty branches throughout the state. RMV is considered an agency that is the "face of state government" where most citizens interact at least once a year. Since the days of long lines and customer confusion, the business model of today has shifted radically with its on-line "branch" making up the majority of transactions- literally changing the very way customers think about and intersect with their RMV.

This event is co-sponsored by the Rappaport Institute for Greater Boston

For more information about this event or the seminar series, please contact John Foote at john_foote@hks.harvard.edu.

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The Impact of the Adams Scholarship on Degree Attainment in Massachusetts

Tuesday, November 13 at 5:45pm
Bell Hall, 5th floor, Belfer Building, Corner of JFK and Eliot Streets

With Josh Goodman, Assistant Professor of Policy, Harvard Kennedy School

Respondent: Rep. Thomas Sannicandro (D-Ashland), Chair of the Massachusetts Legislature's Join Committee on Higher Education

Josh Goodman will discuss his recent research on the state's Adams Scholarship program, which waives tuition at such colleges for high achievers and was intended to inspire student achievement while keeping high-performing scholars in Massachusetts. He also will address the surprising findings of the study: that winning the scholarship actually lowers a student's chances of graduating from college on time.

Rep. Tom Sannicandro will offer commentary on the findings and participate in discussion with the audience following the presentation.

This event is co-sponsored by the Rappaport Institute for Greater Boston and the Program on Education Policy and Governance.

For more information about this event, please contact Polly O'Brien at polly@rappaportinstitute.org.

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Mobility in a Changing World...Innovating through Private Involvement in the Public Sector
From the Planes, Trains and Automobiles (and Bikes) seminar series


Wednesday, November 14 at 4:30pm
Room 401, Taubman Building, 15 Eliot Street

With Mark Joseph, Chief Executive Officer, Veolia Transportation

Around the world, transportation is undergoing massive change, the developing world is urbanizing rapidly and the west is reversing decades of car-centric planning in its cities. Consumers around the world are demanding easy, convenient, and cheap mobility in the form of Uber Taxis, SuperShuttles, smartphone transit apps, and bike shares. But in the US and Europe there is not enough money or political will to make the needed investments in public transportation infrastructure and operations. Mark Joseph will talk about how Veolia is working with cities in the US and around the world to deliver public transit, with a particular focus on the role of the private sector.

For more information about this event or the seminar series, please contact John Foote at john_foote@hks.harvard.edu.

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The Tohuku Disaster: Responding to Japan's 3/11 Earthquake, Tsunami and Nuclear Accident

Wednesday, November 14 at 5:30pm
Nye AB, 5th Floor, Taubman Building, 15 Eliot Street

With Arn Howitt, Faculty Co-Director of the Program on Crisis Leadership

Based on research conducted in Japan this past summer, Dr. Arnold Howitt will explore Japan's emergency response to the catastrophic Great East Japan Earthquake of March 11, 2011. Among other things, he will discuss how the response played out across various levels of government (local, prefectural, and national), and offer recommendations for how Japan can improve its disaster response for the future.

For more information about this event, please contact David Giles at david_giles@hks.harvard.edu.

To see the presentation slides for the event, click here.

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The 2012 Education Next-PEPG Poll on Education

Monday, November 19 at 12:00pm
Room 250, CGIS South Building, 1730 Cambridge Street

With William Howell, Harris School and University of Chicago

Some of the key findings from the sixth annual Education Next-PEPG Survey, a nationally representative sample of U.S. citizens interviewed during April and May of 2012 include:

The Republican tilt of the education views of independents; the especially high marks that Hispanics gave their public schools; strong support among the general public for using test score information to hold teachers accountable; lower confidence in teachers than has previously been reported; the public's (and teachers') growing uneasiness with teachers unions; the shaky foundations of public support for increased spending; and a majority support for a broad ranger of school initiatives.

In addition to the views of the public as a whole, in this year's survey special attention is paid to Hispanics, African Americans, parents, and teachers, all of whom were oversampled in order to obtain a sufficient number of observations.

This event is sponsored by the Program on Education Policy and Governance

For more information about this event, please contact PEPG_Administrator@hks.harvard.edu.

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Education Performance and Education Reform in England: What Are the Lessons of the Radical Reforms in Education Policy?

Wednesday, December 5 at 12:00pm
Fainsod Conference Room, Littauer Building, Third Floor, 79 JFK Street

This event is sponsored by the Program on Education Policy and Governance

For more information about this event, please contact PEPG_Administrator@hks.harvard.edu.

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2011

Triumph of the City: How Our Greatest Invention Makes Us Richer, Smarter, Greener, Happier and Healthier

Wednesday, February 16 7:00 p.m.
Harvard Bookstore
1256 Massachusetts Avenue, Harvard Square

Edward Glaeser, Fred and Eleanor Glimp Professor of Economics, Harvard University
Director of the Taubman Institute for State and Local Government and Rappaport Institute for Greater Boston
Author of Triumph of the City: How Our Greatest Invention Makes Us Richer, Smarter, Greener, Happier and Healthier

America is an urban nation. More than two-thirds of us live on the three percent of land that contains our cities. Yet cities get a bad rap: they're dirty, poor, unhealthy, crime ridden, expensive, environmentally unfriendly...or are they? As Edward Glaeser shows in Triumph of the City, cities are actually the healthiest, greenest and richest (in cultural and economic terms) places to live. Glaeser travels through history and around the globe to reveal the hidden workings of cities and how they bring out the best in humankind. Even the worst cities - Kinshasa, Kolkata, Lagos - confer surprising benefits on the people who flock to them, including better health and more jobs than the rural areas that surround them. Glaeser visits Bangalore and Silicon Valley, whose strangely similar histories prove how essential education is to urban success and how new technology actually encourages people to gather together physically.

This event is co-sponsored by the Harvard Bookstore, the Taubman Center for State and Local Government, and the Rappaport Institute for Greater Boston.

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The Political Economy of Religion Seminar Series
The Empire is Dead, Long Live the Empire! Values and Human Interactions 90 Years After the Fall of the Habsburg Empire
Thursday, February 17 1:00 - 2:30 p.m.

Littauer Center (North Yard), Room M-16
1805 Cambridge Street, Cambridge, MA 02138

Sascha Becker, Warwick University

Papers will be available one week before each seminar presentation.

A light lunch will be served.

For more information contact: Mr. David Zernik at 617-496-3266 or dzernik@fas.harvard.edu.

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Brick City: The Story of Newark
Tuesday, February 22 6:00pm


Littauer Building, JFK, Jr. Forum, 1st Floor
Harvard Kennedy School
79 John F. Kennedy Street, Cambridge, MA 02138

Commentary by:

DaShaun "Jiwe" Morris, Author
Garry McCarthy, Police Director, Newark
Marc Levin, Director/Producer, "Brick City"


Moderated by Robert Behn, Lecturer in Public Policy, Harvard Kennedy School


A screening and panel discussion of "Brick City," which is an award-winning documentary series that captures the daily drama of a community striving to become a better, safter, stronger place to live. While the series focuses on how Newark's citizens and its Mayor, Cory A. Booker, fight to raise the city of out nearly a half century of violence, poverty and corruption, the issues facing Newark are similar to those in many other older industrial cities as well.

This event is co-sponsored by the Institute of Politics, HKS's Program in Criminal Justice Policy and Management, the Taubman Center for State and Local Government, and the Rappaport Institute for Greater Boston.
For more information about this event, please contact Polly O'Brien at polly@rappaportinstitute.org.

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Collective Bargains: Rebuilding and Reparing Public Sector Labor Relations in Difficult Times
Wednesday, February 23 5:30pm

Taubman Building, Allison Dining Room, 5th Floor
Harvard Kennedy School
15 Eliot Street, Cambridge, MA 02138

Thomas A. Kochan, George Maverick Bunker Professor of Management; Professor of Engineering Systems; and Co-Director, Institute for Work and Employment Research at MIT Sloan School of Management


Commentary by:
Jeffrey Mullen, Secretary and CEO, Massachusetts Department of Transportation
State Representative Martin J. Walsh, President, Boston Building Trades Council

Do heated disputes on such issues as drug testing for Boston's firefighters, reducing the cost of providing health insurance for public employees, and changing the ways that teachers are paid suggest that we need to rethink, revisit, and revise the basic structure of public sector labor relations? If so, how might public sector unions, key officials, and civic leaders work together to find equitable and politically acceptable ways to make those changes? Drawing on his research and activities (which included helping resolve the disputes about the Boston firefighters contract and mediating the integration of various workforces and unions at MassDOT), Professor Kochan will offer his thoughts on how to update policies and organizational practices in the public sector to bring them into closer alignment with changes in the nature of work, the workforce, and the economy that already have reshaped private sector employment and unions.

This event is co-sponsored by the Taubman Center for State and Local Government and the Rappaport Institute for Greater Boston.

For more information about this event, please contact Polly O'Brien at polly@rappaportinstitute.org.

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Managing Through Crisis: Public Transit in New York
Wednesday, March 2 4:00 p.m.


Taubman Building, Allison Dining Room, 5th Floor
Harvard Kennedy School
15 Eliot Street, Cambridge, MA 02138

Jay Walder, Chairman and CEO, New York Metropolitan Authority (MTA), and HKS MPP '83

Confronted with significant budget problems not long after he became head of the MTA in late 2009, Jay Walder has overseen the most aggressive cost-cutting initiative in the history of the organization, with cumulative savings expected to reach nearly $4 billion by 2014. At the same time, he has pursued long-overdue service improvements and maintained focus on critical capital investments. Despite these efforts, the MTA's long-term operating and capital budgets remain fragile with significant out-year deficits. Achieving fiscal stability for New York's vital transit system-without dramatic increases in government aid-may require fundamental changes in the agency's cost structure. Issues to be addressed include spiraling pension and health care costs, as well as the need to tie wage increases to productivity gains. How this issue is resolved not only will have significant implications for the nation's other transit agencies but also for other parts of the public sector as well.

This event is co-sponsored by the Taubman Center for State and Local Government, the Mossavar-Rahmini Center for Business and Government, and the Rappaport Institute for Greater Boston.

For more information about this event, please contact Polly O'Brien at polly@rappaportinstitute.org.

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The Political Economy of Religion Seminar Series
Does Culture Matter? Lessons from a Natural Experiment
Thursday, March 3 1:00 - 2:30 p.m.


Littauer Center (North Yard), Room M-16
1805 Cambridge Street, Cambridge, MA 02138


Ricardo Nicolás Pérez Truglia, Harvard University


Papers will be available one week before each seminar presentation.


A light lunch will be served.


For more information contact: Mr. David Zernik at 617-496-3266 or dzernik@fas.harvard.edu.

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The Dynamics of the Legaslative Process: Citizen vs. Professional Legislatures
Thursday, March 10th 12:00pm


Rubenstein Building, RG-20
Harvard Kennedy School
79 JFK Street, Cambridge, MA 02138

Rep. Marilinda Garcia, R-Salem, NH, MPP '10
Donna Sytek, Former Speaker of the NH House of Representatives, R-Salem
Rep. Jeffrey Sanchez, D-Jamaica Plain, MA


New Hampshire and Massachusetts share a border, but their state legislatures are at opposite ends of America. While New Hampshire has a 400-member citizen legislature which only meets for half of the year, Massachusetts has a 160-member professional legislature that meets year-round. Join us to hear from distinguished members of each body to learn how this impacts each state's political environment. What does this mean for getting elected and having a political career? How does the legislative process work? Which type of legislature is best for getting past the gridlock and building trust between parties? Which state offers America its best choice for post-partisan politics?

For more information about this event, please contact Heather Marie Vitale at heather_marie_vitale@hks.harvard.edu.

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Japan in Crisis: Exploring the Consequences of a Cascading Disaster
Tuesday, March 22 4:15pm


Littauer Building, Goodman Room, L-140, First Floor
Harvard Kennedy School
79 JFK Street, Cambridge, MA 02138

On March 11, 2011 a magnitude 9.0 earthquake struck off the east coast of Japan, triggering massive tsunami waves that swept inland, decimating whole towns. Although the total number of casualties remains unknown, as many as 10,000 people are feared dead. Meanwhile, the earthquake also caused damage to several of Japan's nuclear reactors, and authorities continue to struggle to bring the crisis under control.


In this discussion, faculty members, researchers and guest panelists will explore the implications of this catastrophic chain of events and discuss the multi-fold challenges facing Japan as it struggles to respond and recover.


Moderated by Dr. Arnold M. Howitt, Executive Director, Ash Center for Democratic Governance and Innovation, Harvard Kennedy School

Panel includes:
Professor Michael W. Golay, Department of Nuclear Science and Engineering, MIT
Jun Kurihara, Senior Fellow, Ash Center for Democratic Governance and Innovation, HKS
Professor Herman B. "Dutch" Leonard, Harvard Kennedy School and Harvard Business School
Professor Shoji Tsuchida, Faculty of Safety Science, Kansai University, Japan


A Harvard Community Discussion
Disaster Management in Asia Seminar Series


This event is co-sponsored by the Program on Crisis Leadership, the HKS Crisis Management Student Group, and the HKS Japan Caucus.

For more information about this event, please e-mail David Giles at david_giles@hks.harvard.edu. For other events hosted by the Program on Crisis Leadership, click here.

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Public Services Through Careers in Real Estate
Tuesday, March 29 5:30pm


Belfer Building, Bell Hall, 5th Floor
Corner of JFK and Eliot Streets, Cambridge, MA 02138


With:
Joseph Flatley, President and CEO, Massachusetts Housing Investment Corporation, MCRP '73
Evelyn Friedman, Director, Department of Neighborhood Development and Chief of Housing, City of Boston
Chrystal Kornegay, President and CEO, Urban Edge, HKS Achieving Excellence in Community Development Executive Education Program '12


Moderated by Ed Marchant, Adjunct Lecturer, Harvard Kennedy School and Harvard Graduate School of Design

How can individuals working in the non-profit, for-profit, and public sectors use the development and management of financially viable real estate projects to advance the public good?


This event is part of City Week: Helping Urban Areas Thrive, a week-long series or urban-oriented events and activities from March 23-30 that will bring together students, practitioners, and scholars. More information about City Week is available here.

This event is co-sponsored by the Office of Career Advancement, the Real Estate Professional Interest Council, the Joint Center for Housing Studies, the Taubman Center for State and Local Government, and the Rappaport Institute for Greater Boston.

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Innovations in City Budgeting: Opportunities and Challenges in Difficult Times
Wednesday, March 30 5:30pm


Belfer Building, Starr Auditorium, 2nd Floor
Corner of JFK and Eliot Streets, Cambridge, MA


With:
Lisa Calise, CFO, Perkins School for the Blind, former Director of Administration and Finance for City of Boston
Anthony Williams, Bloomberg Lecturer in Public Management, Harvard Kennedy School and former Mayor of Washington, DC, MPP '87, JD '87 Harvard Law


Moderated by Linda Bilmes, Moynihan Senior Lecturer in Public Policy, Harvard Kennedy School

Can key officials in our cities find innovative ways to provide key services in this era of enormous fiscal stress?

This event is part of City Week: Helping Urban Areas Thrive, a week-long series or urban-oriented events and activities from March 23-30 that will bring together students, practitioners, and scholars. More information about City Week is available here.

This event is co-sponsored by the Office of Career Advancement, the Urban Policy Professional Interest Council, Taubman Center for State and Local Government, and the Rappaport Institute for Greater Boston.

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The Political Economy of Religion Seminar Series
The Effect of Education on Religion: Evidence from Compulsory Schooling Laws
March 31 1:00 - 2:30 p.m.


Littauer Center (North Yard), Room M-16
1805 Cambridge Street, Cambridge, MA 02138

Daniel Hungerman, Norte Dame University

Papers will be available one week before each seminar presentation.

A light lunch will be served.

For more information contact: Mr. David Zernik at 617-496-3266 or dzernik@fas.harvard.edu.

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Building Coalitions through Public Service: How Greenwood, Mississippi is Tackling Rural Poverty and Inequality
Monday, April 11 5:30pm


Taubman Building, Allison Dining Room, 5th Floor
Harvard Kennedy School
15 Eliot Street, Cambridge, MA 02138

Please join the Mayor of Greenwood, Mississippi, Carolyn McAdams, and Chief Administrative Officer, Thomas Gregory, as they discuss the challenges of governing a small, racially diverse town with significant pockets of poverty and inequality. Hear how they have partnered with the Community Development Project at the Harvard Kennedy School to work with residents of Baptist Town, a small neighborhood facing challenges such as dilapidated housing and unemployment.

Co-sponsored by the Taubman Center for State and Local Government and the Community Development Project for Public Service Week.

For more information about this event, please contact James Solomon at james_solomon@hks12.harvard.edu.

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The Fiscal Crisis of State and Local Government Pension Systems
Tuesday, April 12, 2011 at 5:30pm


Taubman Building, Allison Dining Room, 5th Floor
Harvard Kennedy School
15 Eliot Street, Cambridge, MA 02138

Joshua Rauh, Associate Professor of Finance, Kellogg School of Management, Northwestern University
Commentary by Greg Mennis, Assistant Secretary for Finance and Infrastructure, Massachusetts Executive Office of Administration and Finance, MPA '07

Fiscally strapped state and local governments have more than $3.5 trillion in unfunded pension liabilities, according to analyses presented in a series of papers by Rauh and Robert Novy-Marx. This figure is higher than what those entities have reported, they argue, because states and localities use flawed accounting procedures that misrepresent the value of pension liabilities by discounting expected returns and assets. Many pension plans, including those run by the states of Louisiana, Illinois, New Jersey, and Connecticut and local pension plans in such cities as Boston, Chicago, Cincinnati, Jacksonville, and St. Paul, do not have assets in place to pay for already-promised benefits beyond 2020. Unless public pension systems are changed in fundamental ways, these looming problems could require substantial increases in taxes or large-scale cuts in public services.

This event is co-sponsored by the Taubman Center for State and Local Government, the Mossavar-Rahmani Center for Business and Government, and the Rappaport Institute for Greater Boston.

For more information about this event, please contact Polly O'Brien at polly@rappaportinstitute.org.

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A Day of Celebration: The Taubman Building at 20
Wednesday, April 13, 2011 from 3:30-6 pm
Taubman Building

Please join us to thank A. Alfred Taubman and family for their foresight and generosity.

3:30-4:30pm: All faculty, staff and students are encouraged to attend an address by Mr. A. Alfred Taubman in the Wiener Auditorium in the Taubman Building. He will be discussing his recent book, Threshold Resistance.
4:30-4:55pm: Portrait Dedication, Fisher Family Rotunda in the Taubman Building. All are welcome.
5:00-6:00pm: Celebratory Remarks and Reception, Nye Conference Center in the Taubman Building. All are welcome.

Co-sponsored by the Taubman Center for State and Local Government and Alumni Relations and Resource Development


Please direct any questions to Heather Marie Vitale at Heather_Marie_Vitale@hks.harvard.edu or 617-495-5140

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Tea Party Rallies: Building Political Movements

Wednesday, August 3 12-1:30 p.m.

Allison Dining Room

How important are rallies for building political movements? Has the Tea Party effected political outcomes, or is it merely a symptom of underlying forces? We explore this issue using new data on the Tea Party movement. After determining the differences in the size of Tea Party rallies across counties, we explore the effect of the initial rallies on subsequent local Tea Party strength, and the importance of Tea Party strength on local politics.

A light lunch will be served.

RSVP Required
RSVP to Heather Marie Vitale at heather_marie_vitale@hks.harvard.edu or call 617-495-5140

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Social and Urban Policy Area: Open House and Ice Cream Social
Wednesday, August 31st at 5:00pm
Allison Dining Room, HKS Taubman Building, 5th Floor
15 Eliot Street

15 Eliot Street, Cambridge, MA 02138

Come and celebrate the beginning of the new term and learn more about the Taubman Center for State and Local Goverment, the Malcolm Wiener Center for Social Policy, and the Rappaport Institute for Greater Boston and our respective programs, affiliated faculty and student activities.

This event is co-sponsored by the Taubman Center for State and Local Goverment, the Malcolm Wiener Center for Social Policy, and the Rappaport Institute for Greater Boston, who together support the Social and Urban Policy concentration.

Please direct any questions to Heather Marie Vitale at heather_marie_vitale@hks.harvard.edu.

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Evolution of Low Cost Airlines

Wednesday, September 21st at 4:30pm

Taubman 301, HKS Taubman Building, 3rd Floor
15 Eliot Street, Cambridge, MA

With Mark Diamond (MPP '86), Principal, SH&E International Air Transport Consultancy

Low cost airlines are steadily expanding, not only in the United States and Europe but in transition economies and developing countries as well. Will we ever get legroom and more than peanuts? As an added bonus, this is an opportunity to learn a little about the airline network planning process.

This event is part of the Planes, Trains and Automobiles (and Bikes) speaker series. It is open to all in the Harvard Kennedy School, Graduate School of Design, Harvard Business School and MIT communities.

Co-sponsored by the Taubman Center for State and Local Government and the Mossavar-Rahmani Center for Business & Government.

For more information or to RSVP, please contact John Foote at john_foote@hks.harvard.edu.

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The 2011 Education Next-PEPG Poll: Teachers and the Public

Thursday, September 22nd at 12:00pm

Room S-050, CGIS South Building, Concourse Level
1730 Cambridge Street, Cambridge, MA

With William G. Howell, Sydney Stein Professor in American Politics, The Harris School, and Professor, Department of Political Science and the College, University of Chicago

William Howell will present some of the latest results from the annual Education Next-PEPG public opinion polls on Americans' attitudes toward education reform. Particular emphasis will be placed on the views of the nation as a whole, as well as a variety of politically salient subgroups, about a variety of school choice and accountability measures.

The event is part of the PEPG Education Policy Colloquia Series and is free to all in the Harvard community. Please RSVP to pepg@fas.harvard.edu.

A light lunch will be provided.

The Education Policy Colloquia Series is presented by the Program on Education Policy and Governance affiliated with the Taubman Center for State and Local Government, and the Department of Government, Harvard University. The series is co-sponsored by the Harvard Graduate School of Education.

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Managing a State DOT in Tough Times

Wednesday, October 5th at 4:30pm

Taubman 301, HKS Taubman Building, 3rd Floor
15 Eliot Street, Cambridge, MA

With Jeff Mullan, former Massachusetts Secretary of Transportation

America's transportation systems and organizations are at a crossroads. Largely built in the post-WWII era, these systems are badly in need of maintenance and repair. At the same time, we need new roads and transit systems to grow our economy and meet the transportation needes of today, not yesterday. In Massachusetts the estimated gap between the dollars we have and the dollars we need to simply repair and maintain the current system is estimated at $1 billion per year. This talk will focus on what Massachusetts leaders have done to manage this situation and what additional steps are needed to address the critical civic need.

This event is part of the Planes, Trains and Automobiles (and Bikes) speaker series. It is open to all in the Harvard Kennedy School, Graduate School of Design, Harvard Business School and MIT communities.

Co-sponsored by the Taubman Center for State and Local Government, the Mossavar-Rahmani Center for Business & Government, and the Rappaport Institute for Greater Boston.

For more information or to RSVP, please contact John Foote at john_foote@hks.harvard.edu.

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Defying Conventional Wisdom: Should Boston Expand its Convention Center (and Add Nearby Hotel Rooms as Well)?

Tuesday, October 11th at 5:30pm

Malkin Penthouse, HKS Littauer Building, 4th Floor
79 John F. Kennedy Street, Cambridge MA

Presentation by James E. Rooney, Executive Director, Massachusetts Convention Center Authority
Commentary by Michael Widmar, President, Massachusetts Taxpayers Foundations
Moderated by Alan Altshuler, Harvard University Distinguished Service, Ruth and Frank Stanton Professor of Urban Policy and Planning, Harvard Kennedy School and Graduate School of Design

Co-sponsored by the Rappaport Institute for Greater Boston.

For more information about this event, please contact Polly O'Brien at polly@rappaportinstitute.org

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Challenges Facing our Urban Public Transit

Wednesday, October 12 at 4:30pm

NEW LOCATION: 
Bell Hall, HKS Belfer Building, 5th Floor

Corner of JFK and Eliot Streets, Cambridge, MA 

With Jay Walder (MPP '83), outgoing Chairman and CEO, MTA New York, and effective Jan. 1, CEO, MTR Corporation, Hong Kong

This event is part of the Planes, Trains and Automobiles (and Bikes) speaker series. It is open to all in the Harvard Kennedy School, Graduate School of Design, Harvard Business School and MIT communities.

Co-sponsored by the Taubman Center for State and Local Government, the Mossavar-Rahmani Center for Business & Government, and the Rappaport Institute for Greater Boston.

For more information or to RSVP, please contact John Foote at john_foote@hks.harvard.edu.

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Can We Measure the Quality of Urban Governance?
Early Evidence and Lessons from a Manhattan Institute Pilot Study

Wednesday, October 19th at 5:30pm

Nye Conference Room A, HKS Taubman Building, 5th Floor
15 Eliot Street, Cambridge, MA

With Aaron Yelowitz, Associate Professor of Economics, University of Kentucky

Commentary by Stephanie Hirsch, Director, Somerville Promise Alliance, and former director, Somerstat performance management program

Americans' lives remain deeply affected by what transpires at local levels of government. Constituents demand leaders who will deliver quality schools, safe neighborhoods and other key services. Yet in recent years, this task has become all the more difficult as the economic downturn has left municipal officials with fewer resources at their disposal. Perhaps now more than ever before, policy analysts, citizens and public officials themselves stand to benefit from an objective, impartial measure of which governments are outperforming others. The Manhattan Institute's Index of Urban Governance Quality has laid the groundwork for such a measure. This pilot study ranks five large cities with respect to four areas of local governance: public safety; educational quality; quality of public spaces; and business environment.

This event is co-sponsored by the Rappaport Institute for Greater Boston.

For more information about this event, please contact Heather Marie Vitale at heather_marie_vitale@hks.harvard.edu.

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Globally Challenged: Are US Students Ready to Compete?

Thursday, October 20th at 12:00pm

Room S-153, CGIS South Building
1730 Cambridge Street, Cambridge, MA

With Paul E. Peterson, Henry Lee Shattuck Professor of Government, Harvard University

The event is part of the PEPG Education Policy Colloquia Series and is free to all in the Harvard community. Please RSVP to pepg@fas.harvard.edu.

A light lunch will be provided.

The Education Policy Colloquia Series is presented by the Program on Education Policy and Governance affiliated with the Taubman Center for State and Local Government, and the Department of Government, Harvard University. The series is co-sponsored by the Harvard Graduate School of Education.

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Reimagining the City - University Connection: Integrating Research, Policy and Practice

Friday, October 21st from 9:00am-5:00pm

Radcliffe Gymnasium, Radcliffe Yard
10 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA

This day-long symposium will bring together scholars and practitioners from a variety of fields and locales to explore accomplishments of, and lessons from, several notable university/city research relationships in Boston and other locales. For a full list of confirmed speakers, please click here.

Preregistration for this symposium will be required. More information and links to registration will be available at www.rappaportinstitute.org.

Co-sponsored by the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study in collaboration with the Rappaport Institute for Greater Boston.

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Creating a New Social Compact: Will "Pay-for-Success Contracts" in Massachusetts Show How to Accelerate Social Innovation and Improve Government Performance?

Monday, October 24th at 5:30pm

Bell Hall, HKS Bell Building, 5th Floor
Corner of JFK and Eliot Streets, Cambridge, MA

Presentation by Jeffrey Liebman, Malcolm Wiener Professor of Public Policy, Malcolm Wiener Center for Social Policy
Moderated by Ed Glaeser, Glimp Professor of Economics; Director, Taubman Center for State and Local Government and Director, Rappaport Institute for Greater Boston

Co-sponsored by the Rappaport Institute for Greater Boston

For more information about this event, please contact Polly O'Brien at polly@rappaportinstitute.org

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How to Win a Street Fight: Reclaiming the American City from the Automobile

Wednesday, October 26th at 4:30pm 

Taubman 301, HKS Taubman Building, 3rd Floor
15 Eliot Street, Cambridge, MA

With Aaron Naparstek, Founding Editor of Streetsblog, and Ian Lockwood, AECOM

This event is part of the Planes, Trains and Automobiles (and Bikes) speaker series. It is open to all in the Harvard Kennedy School, Graduate School of Design, Harvard Business School and MIT communities.

Co-sponsored by the Taubman Center for State and Local Government and the Mossavar-Rahmani Center for Business & Government.

For more information or to RSVP, please contact John Foote at john_foote@hks.harvard.edu.

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The Current Politics of Transportation: the View from Washington

Monday, October 31st at 4:30

Taubman 301, HKS Taubman Building, 3rd Floor
15 Eliot Street, Cambridge, MA

With Polly Trottenberg (MPP '92), Assistant Secretary for Transportation Policy, US Department of Transportation

This event is part of the Planes, Trains and Automobiles (and Bikes) speaker series. It is open to all in the Harvard Kennedy School, Graduate School of Design, Harvard Business School and MIT communities.

Co-sponsored by the Taubman Center for State and Local Government and the Mossavar-Rahmani Center for Business & Government.

For more information or to RSVP, please contact John Foote at john_foote@hks.harvard.edu.

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Where's My Bus...and Beyond: How Did Transit Agencies "Open" Their Data and What are the Benefits to Both Riders and Providers?

Tuesday, November 1st at 5:30pm

Nye BC, HKS Taubman Building, 5th Floor
15 Eliot Street, Cambridge, MA

With Francisca Rojas, Postdoctoral Fellow, Transparency Policy Project, Ash Center for Democratic Governance and Innovation
and Josh Robin, Director of Innovation, MBTA

Co-sponsored by the Rappaport Institute for Greater Boston

For more information about this event, please contact Polly O'Brien at polly@rappaportinstitute.org

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The Elite Illusion: Achievement Effects at Boston and New York Exam Schools

Wednesday, November 9th at 12:00pm

Room S-050, CGIS South Building, Concourse Level
1730 Cambridge Street, Cambridge, MA

With Parag Pathak, Associate Professor of Economics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Talented students compete fiercely for seats at Boston and New York exam schools. These schools are characterized by high levels of peer achievement and a demanding curriculum tailored to each district's highest achievers. While exam school students do very well in school, the question of whether an exam school education adds value relative to regular public education remains open. We estimate the causal effect of exam school attendance using a regression-discontinuity design, reporting both parametric and non-parametric estimates. The outcomes studied here include scores on state standardized achievement tests, PSAT and SAT participation and scores, and AP scores. Our estimates show little effect of exam school offers on most students' achievement. We use two-stage least squares to convert reduced form estimates of the effects of exam school offers into estimates of peer and tracking effects, arguing that these appear to be unimportant in this context. Finally, we explore the external validity of RD estimates, arguing that as best we can tell, there is little effect of an exam school education on achievement even for the highest-ability marginal applicants and for applicants to the right of admissions cutoffs. On the other hand, a Boston exam school education seems to have a modest effect on high school English scores for minority applicants. A small group of 9th grade applicants also appears to do better on SAT Reasoning.

These localized gains notwithstanding, the intense competition for exam school seats does not appear to be justified by improved learning for a broad set of students.

The paper is available here: http://www.nber.org/papers/w17264.pdf

The event is part of the PEPG Education Policy Colloquia Series and is free to all in the Harvard community. Please RSVP to pepg@fas.harvard.edu. It is co-sponsored by the Rappaport Institute for Greater Boston.

A light lunch will be provided.

The Education Policy Colloquia Series is presented by the Program on Education Policy and Governance affiliated with the Taubman Center for State and Local Government, and the Department of Government, Harvard University. The series is co-sponsored by the Harvard Graduate School of Education.

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The Real Impact of Transit Subsidies

Wednesday, November 9th at 4:30pm

Taubman 301, HKS Taubman Building, 3rd Floor
15 Eliot Street, Cambridge, MA

With Don Pickrell, Chief Economist, Volpe Center

This event is part of the Planes, Trains and Automobiles (and Bikes) speaker series. It is open to all in the Harvard Kennedy School, Graduate School of Design, Harvard Business School and MIT communities.

Co-sponsored by the Taubman Center for State and Local Government and the Mossavar-Rahmani Center for Business & Government.

For more information or to RSVP, please contact John Foote at john_foote@hks.harvard.edu.

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The Private View of a P3

Wednesday, November 16th at 4:30pm

Taubman 301, HKS Taubman Building, 3rd Floor
15 Eliot Street, Cambridge, MA

With Samara Barend (MPP '04), Vice President of Strategic Development and P3s, AECOM

This event is part of the Planes, Trains and Automobiles (and Bikes) speaker series. It is open to all in the Harvard Kennedy School, Graduate School of Design, Harvard Business School and MIT communities.

Co-sponsored by the Taubman Center for State and Local Government and the Mossavar-Rahmani Center for Business & Government.

For more information or to RSVP, please contact John Foote at john_foote@hks.harvard.edu.

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First in the Nation: A Conversation with the New Hampshire Secretary of State, Bill Gardner

Thursday, November 17th at 6:30pm

Malkin Penthouse, HKS Littauer Building, 4th Floor
79 JFK Street, Cambridge, MA

Meet the man who has the sole authority to set the date of the NH Primary. Secretary Gardner, the longest serving state-level Secretary of State in the nation, will discuss the uniqueness of the NH Primary and its role in selecting the president.

Refreshments will be provided.

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The Imperative of Infrastructure Bonds

Wednesday, November 30th at 4:30pm

Taubman 301, HKS Taubman Building, 3rd Floor
15 Eliot Street, Cambridge, MA

With Heidi Crebo-Rediker, Chief of International Finance and Economics for the Senate Foreign Relations Committee

This event is part of the Planes, Trains and Automobiles (and Bikes) speaker series. It is open to all in the Harvard Kennedy School, Graduate School of Design, Harvard Business School and MIT communities.

Co-sponsored by the Taubman Center for State and Local Government and the Mossavar-Rahmani Center for Business & Government.

For more information or to RSVP, please contact John Foote at john_foote@hks.harvard.edu.

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Forum: Mayors on the Front Line: Occupy Wall Street, Flash Mobs, and Gun Violence

Wednesday, November 30th at 6:00pm

JFK Jr. Forum, HKS Littauer Building, 1st Floor
79 JFK Street, Cambridge, MA

With the Honorable Greg Fischer, Mayor, Louisville, KY; the Honorable Michael Nutter, Philadelphia, PA; and the Honorable Stephanie Rawlings-Blake, Baltimore, MD, in conversation with IOP Director Trey Grayson.

Co-sponsored by the Institute for Politics.

This event is open to the public. You can watch a live stream of the event here.

For more information about the event, please contact Heather Gain at heather_gain@hks.harvard.edu.

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Forum: The Challenge of Growing Inequality

Thursday, December 1st at 6:00pm

JFK Jr. Forum, HKS Littauer Building, 1st Floor
79 JFK Street, Cambridge, MA

With Katy Edin, Professor of Public Policy and Management; Edward Glaeser, Fred and Eleanor Glimp Professor of Economics and Director of Taubman Center for State and Local Government and Rappaport Institute for Greater Boston; Lawrence F. Katz, Elisabeth Allison Professor of Economics; William Julius Wilson, Lewis P. and Linda L. Geyser University Professor; in conversation with David Ellwood, Dean, Harvard Kennedy School.

This event is co-sponsored by the Institute of Politics and the Malcolm Wiener Center for Social Policy.

For more information about the event, please contact Heather Gain at heather_gain@hks.harvard.edu.

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The Promise of Hubway

Wednesday, December 7th at 4:30pm

Taubman 301, HKS Taubman Building, 3rd Floor
15 Eliot Street, Cambridge, MA

With Nicole Freedman, Director of Bicycle Program, City of Boston, and Scott Mullen, General Manager, Hubway

This event is part of the Planes, Trains and Automobiles (and Bikes) speaker series. It is open to all in the Harvard Kennedy School, Graduate School of Design, Harvard Business School and MIT communities.

Co-sponsored by the Rappaport Institute for Greater Boston

For more information or to RSVP, please contact John Foote at john_foote@hks.harvard.edu.

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Covering Disasters in Southeast Asia: A Reporter's Perspective
A Disaster Management in Asia Series Event

Thursday, December 8th at 12:15pm

Taubman 301, HKS Taubman Building, 3rd Floor
15 Eliot Street, Cambridge, MA

With Margie Mason, Acting Vietnam Bureau Chief, Associated Press

Moderated by Arnold M. Howitt, Faculty Co-Director, Program on Crisis Leadership

Margie Mason is the AP's Acting Bureau Chief in Vietnam and medical writer for the Asia-Pacific region. She has reported from more than 20 countries over the past decade, writing about an array of disasters and global outbreaks. Among other events, she has covered the flooding that recently ravaged Thailand, Cambodia and Vietnam; the 2010 floods in Pakistan; Cyclone Nargis; which devastated Myanmar in 2008; and the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami. In this brown bag talk, Ms. Mason will discuss the unique challenges of reporting on these and other distinctive events in the region.

This event is sponsored by the Kennedy School's Program on Crisis Leadership, the Harvard University Asia Center and the Nieman Foundation for Journalism.

For more information, please contact David Giles at david_giles@harvard.edu or click here.

2010

The Geography of Innovation:
Why Do Clusters of Entrepreneurs Exist in Some Areas and Not in Others?

Monday, February 22 at 5:30 p.m.
Allison Dining Room, 5th floor
, Taubman Building, Corner 15 Eliot Street

Edward L. Glaeser, Glimp Professor of Economics, Harvard University, Director, Taubman Center for State and Local Government and Director of the Rappaport Institute for Greater Boston and co-author, Urban Economics and Entrepreneurship and Clusters of Entrepreneurship, two recent NBER working papers

Can the economic history of Detroit be told without Henry Ford and Alfred Sloan? Would Ford have achieved the same success if he had worked in Houston? Would Silicon Valley have experienced its remarkable growth without Frederick Terman and William Shockley? Entrepreneurs often seem to have been significantly influenced by features of their local economies, and they have often influenced the fates of those economies. Yet, urban economists have only infrequently looked directly at the local causes and consequences of entrepreneurship, including policies and programs carried out by local and state governments in those regions.

Cosponsored by the Taubman Center for State and Local Government and the Mossavar-Rahmani Center for Business and Government

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An Innovations Agenda for Massachusetts
Monday, March 8 at 5:30 p.m.
Allison Dining Room,
5th floor, Taubman Building, 15 Eliot Street

Gregory Bialecki, Massachusetts Secretary of Housing and Economic Development

In a July 2009 “Declaration of Innovation,” posted on his new blog, Secretary Bialecki stated that “the Commonwealth must have a deliberate innovation agenda as a core element of our economic development strategy.”  Late last year, he described 10 key parts of that agenda which ranged from better marketing to providing start-ups with gap funding and a variety of policies in between.  How were these elements chosen, how are they are being carried out and what are the preliminary results of these efforts?

Cosponsored by the Taubman Center for State and Local Government and the Mossavar-Rahmani Center for Business and Government

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Geography, Venture Capital, and Public Policy:
Can Publicly Supported Entrepreneurship Succeed?

Wednesday, March 24 at 5:30 p.m.
Nye AB,
5th floor, Taubman Building, 15 Eliot Street

Josh Lerner, Schiff Professor of Investment Banking, Harvard Business School, Author, Boulevard of Broken Dreams: Why Public Efforts to Boost Entrepreneurship and Venture Capital Have Failed—and What to Do About It (2009, Princeton University Press)

About half of all U.S. venture capital firms as well as about half of all companies financed by those firms are located in just three metropolitan areas: San Francisco/San Jose, Boston, and New York.  Moreover, compared to the total amount of money invested, venture-backed companies make outsized contributions to their local economies.  Recognizing this, many states and localities are actively trying to retain existing venture capital firms and attract new ones.  What can those efforts learn from previous successful and failed efforts to spur entrepreneurial activity?

Cosponsored by the Taubman Center for State and Local Government and the Mossavar-Rahmani Center for Business and Government

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Tackling the Nation’s Toughest Housing Challenges: Boston Neighborhoods
Wednesday, March 31 at 12:00 p.m.
Room TBA, 1st Floor, Gund Hall
, Harvard Graduate School of Design, 48 Quincy Street

Evelyn Friedman, Chief of Housing and Director, Department of Neighborhood Development, City of Boston

Cosponsored by the Taubman Center for State and Local Government and the Joint Center for Housing Studies

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The Taubman Center and its Affiliate Programs sponsor periodic conferences on a variety of subjects. Most of these conferences are open to the public; some are free; others have a registration fee.

New Technologies and Interdisciplinary Research on Religion
March 12-13, 2010

Conference co-sponsored by

Political Economy of  Religion Program, Taubman Center, Harvard Kennedy School of Government and the Center for Geographic Analysis, Institute for Quantitative Social Science, Harvard

New technologies are permitting researchers from various disciplines to work together to access in various operational formats large quantities of data. For example, technologies such as Geographic Information Systems (GIS) software are innovative ways of collecting and merging together large amounts of data. Google Map and Google Earth are popular tools for spatial visualization that can interface with GIS.  Text-mining, a technological tool relevant to the study of religion, draws on information retrieval and data mining creating patterns from large quantities of texts and making them available for scholarly analysis.

The purpose of the two-day conference is to bring together scholars from a wide range of disciplines who are interested in applying these and other new technologies to their research on religion.  Conference discussion will focus on the advantages and challenges of applying new technologies to research on religion.  Harvard experts as well as scholars from other institutions will show-case their current work in various disciplines using new technologies and forms of analysis. Presentations will focus on combining the content of research on religion with database design, geo-referencing, social network analysis, text-mining, remote-sensing, and spatial-temporal analysis.  Spatial–temporal analysis, text-mining, and social network analysis will be discussed as a means of extending and deepening research on religion. Tutorials will be held each day for small group, hands-on learning. A poster session will display a collection of relevant research activities related to the study of religion.

The interdisciplinary nature of the conference presentations and discussion is critical to exploring promising new research pathways.  Scholars working in different fields tend to be isolated from scholars working in other areas.  This conference seeks to create a network of scholars working in different disciplines such as sociology, economics, history, political science, and regional studies to become aware of research already being done and define horizons for future research.  What is unique about the new technologies is that they permit cross-disciplinary dialogue and collaboration.  A main function of the conference will be to foster dialogue among scholars from various disciplines who work on religion and to initiate network-building and collaboration among scholars.

Organizers of the Conference

Rachel M. McCleary is Senior Research Fellow, Taubman Center, John F. Kennedy School of Government, Harvard University, and Research Fellow of the Hoover Institution of Stanford University.  She holds a Ph.D. in philosophy from the University of Chicago, a Master of Theological Studies from Emory University, and B.A. (double major) from Indiana University.  McCleary conducts research on the political economy of religion.  Her research focuses on cross-country studies on religion, religious beliefs and aspects of economic development.  McCleary is currently editor of the Oxford University Press Handbook of the Economics of Religion (forthcoming 2010). Her books include Global Compassion: Private Voluntary Agencies and U.S. Foreign Policy since 1939 (Oxford University Press 2009), Dictating Democracy: Guatemala and the of End Violent Revolution (University Press of Florida, 1999–English; Artemis-Edinter 1999–Spanish), and Seeking Justice: Ethics and International Affairs (Boulder: Westview Press, 1992).
 
Contact information:
Harvard Kennedy School of Government
Taubman Center
79 JFK Street
Cambridge, MA 02138
rachel_mccleary@harvard.edu

Peter K. Bol is the Charles H. Carswell Professor of East Asian Languages and Civilizations. He led Harvard’s university-wide effort to establish support for geospatial analysis in teaching and research; in 2005 he was named the first director of the Center for Geographic Analysis. He also directs the China Historical Geographic Information Systems project, a collaboration between Harvard and Fudan University in Shanghai to create a GIS for 2000 years of Chinese history, and the China Biographical Database project, a collaboration between Harvard, Academia Sinica, and Peking University. He is the author of “This Culture of Ours” – Intellectual Transitions in T’ang and Sung China (1982) and Neo-Confucianism in History  (2008) and various studies of China’s sociocultural history.

Contact Information:
Department of East Asian Languages and Civilizations (EALC)
Harvard University
2 Divinity Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02138 
pkbol@fas.harvard.edu

Outside presenters:
John Corrigan, Florida State University, Department of Religion, French and Spanish
Missions in North America
Juan Carlos Esparza Ochoa, University of Texas at Austin, Project on Religion and Economic Change, Population Research Center.
Roger Finke, Pennsylvania State University, Sociology and Religious Studies, Association of Religion Data Archives (The ARDA)
Brian Grim, Pew Forum,Washington, D.C.
Murat Iyigun, University of Colorado at Boulder, Department of Economics
Karl Ryavec, University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point, Geography, Tibetan and Himalayan Digital Library
Gray Tuttle, Columbia University, Department of East Asian Languages and Cultures, Modern Tibetan Studies
Chris Weaver, School of Computer Science and the Center for Spatial Analysis, University of Oklahoma
Robert Woodberry, Sociology, University of Texas at Austin

Harvard presenters:
Merrick Lex Berman, Center for Geographic Analysis
Peter Bol, Department of East Asian Languages and Civilizations
Suzanne Preston Blier, Professor of Fine Arts, African and African American Studies
Rachel McCleary, Kennedy School of Government
Nathan Nunn, Economics Department
James Robson, Department of East Asian Languages and Civilizations
Michael Szonyi, Department of East Asian Languages and Civilizations

The conference will be open to anyone who wishes to attend. 

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Saving America’s Cities:
Ed Logue and the Struggles to Renew Urban America in the Suburban Age

Thursday, April 29 at 4:00 p.m.
Belfer Case Study Room, C020 CGIS South Building,
1730 Cambridge Street

Lizabeth Cohen, Howard Mumford Jones Professor of American Studies, Harvard University

Though he served in Boston more than 40 years ago, the life of Edward J. Logue, who headed the Boston Redevelopment Authority from 1960 until 1967, sheds important light on the key issues facing Boston and other major cities in the 21st century.  During his long career, which also included stints in New Haven and New York and less formal connections with officials in dozens of other locales, he reshaped both the physical and political landscapes in American cities.  He was, moreover, at the heart of seminal discussions and decisions about such questions as who, if anyone should plan cities, the proper balance of public and private interests that should be served, the public and private resources that should be expended in city building, and about who and what a city is really for – questions that are as pressing today as they were when he served.

Cosponsored by Harvard’s Center for American Political Studies and the Taubman Center for State and Local Government

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Are The Trains on Track?
Tuesday, July 20, 2010 from 12-1 pm
Room: T301
Participant: Tony Gomez-Ibanez
Lead: S. Garron

Co-sponsored by the Taubman Center for State and Local Government


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Oh, Brother: The Impact of Sibling Gender on Educational Outcomes
Tuesday, August 3, 2010 from 12-1 pm
Nye A&B

Taubman Center Summer Luncheon Series with Professor Joshua Goodman

Co-sponsored by the Taubman Center for State and Local Government

Please direct any questions to Heather Marie Vitale at Heather_Maire_Vitale@hks.harvard.edu or 617-495-5140

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Summer Snapshots: On Current Policy Issues
Taubman Center Summer Luncheon Speaker Series


Thursday, August 19, 2010 from 12:00pm to 1:30pm
Allison Dining Room, HKS Taubman Building, 5th Floor

Raj Chetty, Professor of Economics, FAS
John Friedman, Assistant Professor of Public Policy, HKS

Join us for the last of our Taubman Center Summer Luncheon Series. Professors Chetty and Friedman will present snapshots of their recent research on current public policy issues, including a study of how Kindergarten classes affect earnings at age 30, how income affects health and mortality, and growth and inequality across cities in the United States.


A light lunch will be served.


This event is free and open to the public.


Please RSVP to Heather Marie Vitale at heather_marie_vitale@hks.harvard.edu.


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Social and Urban Policy Area: Open House and Ice Cream Social
Hosted by the Taubman Center and Malcolm Wiener Center for Social Policy

Tuesday, August 31st, 2010 from 5:00pm-6:30pm


Allison Dining Room, HKS Taubman Building, 5th Floor


Come and celebrate the beginning of the new term and learn more about the Taubman Center for State and Local Government and the Malcolm Wiener Center for Social Policy and our respective programs, affiliated faculty and student activities.

Please direct any questions to Heather Marie Vitale at heather_marie_vitale@hks.harvard.edu.

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Taubman Brown Bag Series: On The Road Again: Europeans Pay The Price

September 15 at 12:00pm

Taubman Building, Allison Dining Room, 5th Floor
Harvard Kennedy School
15 Eliot Street, Cambridge, MA 02138

Rémy Prud'homme, Professor of Economics, Emeritus - University of Paris, has estimated and compared the costs and benefits generated by road usage and his findings may be just what many Europeans suspected all along:  in practically all cases road users pay more, and in some cases much more than the costs that are a consequence of their usage.  Professor Prud’homme takes a look at five of the largest European countries from four distinct perspectives: a public finance approach, a complete cost approach, a marginal cost approach, and a traditional cost-benefit approach.

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Ending Homelessness
Hosted by the Taubman Center and Malcolm Wiener Center for Social Policy


Tuesday, September 21, 2010 from 5:30pm-7:00pm


Malkin Penthouse, HKS Littauer Building, 5th Floor
79 JFK Street, Cambridge, MA 02138


A Panel Discussion featuring:
Lyndia Downie, President and Executive Director, Pine Street Inn
Philip Mangano, President and CEO, The American Roundtable to End Homelessness
Geraldine McCafferty, Director of Housing, City of Springfield, MA
Moderated by Julie Boatright Wilson, Senior Lecturer in Social Policy and Director, Malcolm Wiener Center for Social Policy
According to the US Department of Housing and Urban Development, there were 664,414 sheltered and unsheltered homeless persons nationwide on a single night in January 2008. While no state, city or country in the United States is immune to this issue, some communities have made great strides in addressing this heart-wrenching problem. How were they able to reduce homelessness by as much as 70% in less than 10 years? Attendees will learn from two distinguished policy makers and the director of New England's largest social service provider about evidence based, consumer centric strategies, as well as the challenges they encountered while implementing the new initiatives.

Co-sponsored by the Taubman Center for State and Local Government and Malcolm Wiener Center for Social Policy 

Please direct any questions to Heather Marie Vitale at Heather_Maire_Vitale@hks.harvard.edu or 617-495-5140

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New Urban Mechanics: How "Peer-Produced" Government Can Help Fill Potholes,
Save Cities, and Maybe Even Rescue Democracy

Co-sponsored by the Rappaport Institute for Greater Boston, the Taubman Center
and the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study


Thursday, September 23rd, 2010 at 5:30pm


Allison Dining Room, HKS Taubman Building, 5th Floor
79 JFK Street, Cambridge, MA 02138

With:
Mitchell Weiss, Chief of Staff, Office of Mayor Thomas M. Menino, City of Boston
Commentary by Robert Behn, Lecturer in Public Policy, Harvard Kennedy School


"We are all urban mechanics." Boston Mayor Thomas Menino said in January 2010, ushering in his fifth term and heralding a new era of
"peer-produced" city government. A combination of new technologies, a resurgent spirit of civic engagement, and the latest social science
on cooperation is leading cities to re-think the way they deliver services. New Urban Mechanics is Boston's path-breaking approach.
Smartphone apps that crowd-source participation, strategies that stress experiementation, and a philosophy that invites neighbors to play a larger role are already having an impact in Boston. The new Chief of Staff to Mayor Menino, Mitch Weiss, will share his perspective on these trends and whether they represent the next big wave in municipal innovation.

Please direct any questions to Polly O'Brien at polly@rapportinstitute.org.

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Rappaport Fall Board Meeting
Friday, September 24, 2010 from 1-2:30 pm
Room: Bell Hall
Participant: A. Chandra, J. Sanchez
Lead: P. O’Brien

Co-sponsored by the Rappaport Institute

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High School Success Stories: How Did Some Exemplay High Schools in Greater Boston Raise Achievement and Narrow Test Score Gaps?
Tuesday, September 28, 2010 from 5:30-7 pm
Nye AB, 5th floor Taubman Building, 15 Eliot Street

Ronald Ferguson, Faculty Co-chair and Director, Achievement Gap Initiative at Harvard University and Co-Author, "How High Schools Become Exemplary: Ways That Leadership Raises Achievement and Narrows Gaps by Improving Instruction in 15 Public High Schools"
Commentary by Mary Skipper, Chief Education Officer, TechBoston Academy Upper and Lower
Other commentators TBA

Viewed nationally, American high schools have done little to raise reading and math test scores for several decades or to increase graduation rates for their students. Some schools, however, have made quite impressive improvements. In a new report that draws on presentations made last spring by leaders of 15 of these schools – including eight schools in Massachusetts – the Achievement Gap Initiative found that student achievement rose when leadership times focused thoughtfully and relentlessly on improving the quality of instruction.

Co-sponsored by the Taubman Center for State and Local Government and Malcolm Wiener Center for Social Policy, The Achievement Gap Initiative, and the Program on Education Policy and Governance

Please direct any questions to Polly O’Brien at paulina_obrien@hks.harvard.edu or 617-495-5091

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Rappaport Fellows Program 10th Anniversary
Wednesday, October 13, 2010 from 6-8 pm
Room: DeCordova Museum
Participant: E. Glaeser & D. Luberoff
Lead: P. O’Brien


Co-sponsored by the Rappaport Institute

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The Future of Housing (Chpt. 40B)
Tuesday, October 19, 2010 from 5:30-7 pm
Room: ADR
Participant: Tina Brooks, Ed Glaeser & Alex von Hoffman
Lead: P. O’Brien


Co-sponsored by the Taubman, Rappaport & Joint Center

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Increased Solvability or Increased Intrusion? The Use of Familial DNA in Criminal Investigations

Monday, October 25 at 5:30 p.m.

Allison Dining Room, 5th floor, Taubman Building, Harvard Kennedy School

• David Lazer, Associate Professor of Political Science and Computer Science, Northeastern University and Director, Program on Networked Governance, Harvard Kennedy School
• Sir Ian Blair, Commissioner of the Metropolitan Police(UK), 2005–2008
• Larry R. Tipton, Attorney-in-Charge of the Superior Court Norfolk County Office of the Committee for Public Counsel Services (CPCS)
What is the impact of increased collection of DNA samples on solving crimes? Is the increased collection of and use of partial samples net-widening or increasing safety? Is this the cost of increased safety?

Sponsored by the Program in Criminal Justice Policy and Management and the Rappaport Institute for Greater Boston


Please direct any questions to Brian Welch at brian_welch@harvard.edu or 617-495-5188

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Transporting Hazardous Materials: Externalities & Rick Reduction
Wednesday, October 27, 2010 from 12-1:30 pm
Room: ADR
Participant: Mark Fagan
Lead: S. Garron


Co-sponsored by the Taubman Center & CBG

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Protecting the Safety Net in Hard Times: Lessons from Catholic Charities of Boston
Thursday, October 28, 2010 from 5:30-7 pm
Allison Dining Room, 5th floor Taubman Building, 15 Eliot Street


Tiziana Dearing, CEO, Boston Rising and former President, Catholic Charities of the Archdiocese of Boston
Commentary by Mary Jo Bane, Bradshaw Professor of Public Policy and Management and Academic Dean, Harvard Kennedy School


The current economic downturn has created two great problems for those who fund and offer key social services for those most in need. On the one hand, the downturn has greatly increased the demand for services. At the same time, it also has greatly reduced public and charitable funding for those services. Dearing will discuss how one major provider in Boston responded to these pressures and discuss how that experience informs her work as the new head of Boston Rising, a new non-profit focused on fighting poverty in Boston.

Co-sponsored by the Taubman Center for State and Local Government and Malcolm Wiener Center for Social Policy and the Hauser Center for Nonprofit Organizations

Please direct any questions to Polly O’Brien at paulina_obrien@hks.harvard.edu or 617-495-5091

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The Cost of Good Intentions: Cities Under Stress
Co-sponsored by the Rappaport Institute for Greater Boston


Monday, November 8th, 2010 at 5:30pm


Allison Dining Room, HKS Taubman Building, 5th Floor
15 Eliot Street, Cambridge, MA 02138


With:
Mayor Joseph Curtatone - City of Somerville
Mayor James Fiorentini - City of Haverhill
Mayor Lisa Wong - City of Fitchburg

The economic downturn has hammered local governments throughout the Commonwealth and the nation. Tax revenues have dropped, the need for many social services has increased and the flow of federal stimulus support may soon dry up. How can localities best react to this fiscal firestorm? What is the right balance between raising revenues and cutting services? Hear from three local mid-size city mayors as they discuss successes and disappointments.

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Fall Taubman Advisory Board Meeting
Thursday, November 11, 2010 from 8-10 am
Room: Henrietta’s Table
Participant: Taubman Advisory Board
Lead: S. Garron


Co-sponsored by the Taubman Center

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Sustaining Health Care Reform in Massachusetts (and Beyond)


Monday, November 15th, 2010 at 5:30pm


Allison Dining Room, HKS Taubman Building, 5th Floor
15 Eliot Street, Cambridge, MA 02138


With Jon Kingsdale, former Executive Director, Commonwealth Health Insurance Connector
Commentary by David Cutler, Eckstein Professor of Applied Economics, Harvard University and Senior Health Care Advisor to Obama campaign

While Massachusetts' groundbreaking health care reform law greatly reduced the number of uninsured people in the state and provided a model for national reform, many key challenges must still be addressed at state and national levels. Most notably, the state's efforts to revamp payment systems in ways that might restraon the growth in health care costs have stalled while premiums for health insurance have continued to rise, particularly for small businesses. Looking forward, what can the state do to address these issues and what does the state's experience suggest about national health care reform as well?

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Reinventing the Rust Belt
Monday, November 29, 2010 from 5:30-7 pm
Room: ADR

With:
Dennis Archer - Former Mayor of Detroit
Barry Bluestone - Dean, Northestern University School of Public Policy and Urban Affairs and Director, Dukakis Center for Urban and Regional Policy
Denise DiPasquale - President and founder of City Research, a research firm focused on urban economics and policy issues

Since 1950, Buffalo, Cleveland, and Detroit have all lost more than one-half of its population, and the recent recession has only underscored the continuing economic weakness of the Rust Belt. Michigan, Indiana and Ohio are three of the eleven states that continue to have double digit unemployment rates. Can we imagine a brighter future for the children of America’s erstwhile manufacturing hub? How much can government do to reverse the tidal waves of economic history? What should be done to alleviate the human suffering that haunts these once-wealthy industrial areas? A packed panel of political leaders and experts debate the future of the Rust Belt.

Co-sponsored by the Taubman Center for State and Local Government

Please RSVP to Heather Marie Vitale at Heather_Maire_Vitale@hks.harvard.edu or 617-495-5140

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An International Platter for Local Economies
Room: Starr Auditorium
Wednesday, December 1, 2010 from 5:30-7 pm

It’s never been more important for state and local governments to take action to find innovative approaches to business development and job creation! Successful efforts to attract international businesses, in particular, can provide a boost to local economies during these difficult financial times. Our panel of speakers will share their perspectives and discuss how, in this environment, localities are finding ways to utilize existing information pipelines to form new partnerships by pairing like international industries with local clusters. These collaborations allow state and local governments to remain competitive internationally while conserving vital resources.

With:
Patrick Bench - Vice President of Public Affairs, Rasky Baerlein; Previously of the Massachusetts Office of International Trade and Investment

Michael Graney - Senior Vice President of Business Development, Economic Development Council of Western Massachusetts

Samantha Hammar - Innovation District Strategist, Boston Redevelopment Authority

Please RSVP to Heather Marie Vitale at Heather_Marie_Vitale@hks.harvard.edu or 617-495-5140

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Wednesday, October 30, 2013 at 4:30pm
Taubman 401

Jackie Douglas, Executive Director of LivableStreets Alliance

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