Mathias Risse
 
 
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work on Political Philosophy

Book: On Global Justice
(May be purchased at Princeton University Press or on Amazon)

BOOK: GLobal Political Philosophy
(may be purchased at Palgrave's Philosophy today series or on Amazon)

Papers on Decision TheorY/Collective Choice

work on Nietzsche

Miscellaneous work
 

 

  The piece on the decent person below was prompted by the observation that very little theoretical attention is paid to that notion, although that term appears rather often in the literature on moral philosophy. The piece on "Racial Profiling," joint with Richard Zeckhauser, emerged from an annual joint session between the ethics and statistics classes of the MPP program at the Kennedy School. The subject of racial profiling is ideal for exploring how ethical and statistical reasoning apply to the same scenario. Richard Zeckhauser and I wrote this piece because there is fairly little systematic reflection on racial profiling. Given its history, the term tends to be used pejoratively, as a term criticizing police tactics, and it is generally overlooked that there really are different issues here that need to be considered separately -- police abuse, the use of race in police tactics, and the disproportionate use of race in such contexts. Our paper is concerned with offering a moral evaluation of the second issue, both from a consequentialist and from a non-consequentialist standpoint. Annabelle Lever and Kaspar Lippert-Rasmussen wrote critical responses to this, and in 2006 the Eastern APA included a symposium on these issues. On that occasion I presented a paper responding to these criticisms ("Racial Profiling: A Response to Two Critics.")

 

  "Racial Profiling: A Reply to Two Critics"
 
  •  IN Criminal Justice Ethics 26 (1) (APA Symposium on Racial Profiling): pp 4-20
  "Racial Profiling"
 
  • IN Philosophy and Public Affairs, April 2004.
  "The Morally Decent Person"
 
  • IN The Southern Journal of Philosophy (2000), Vol. XXXVIII, pp 263-279
 

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