API414 Citizen Politics
 
Pippa Norris API-413 www.pippanorris.com
John F. Kennedy School of Government, Harvard University
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API-414

Citizen Politics

Syllabi


Spring 2009

1 credit

Pippa Norris

Contents

 

Class time:                          Mondays and Wednesdays 2:40- 4:00pm

Class place:                         Littauer 280

Shopping:                             Monday 26th January 2009

First class:                            Wednesday 28th Jan 2009

Last class:                            Wednesday 29th April 2009

Lecturer:                              Pippa Norris, McGuire Lecturer in Comparative Politics

Office:                                 Littauer 110, Kennedy School of Government

Office Hours:                      Tuesdays 2.00-4.30pm (Sign-up sheet on the door)
Fax:                                      (617) 496 2850

Tel:                                      (617) 495 1475
Email:                                  
Pippa_Norris@harvard.edu

Weblog:                               http://pippanorris.typepad.com/

Class website:                     www.pippanorris.com under ‘classes’

Faculty Assistant:               Camiliakumari Wankaner

Office:                                  Littauer 201 Tel: (617) 495 5994 Fax: (617) 496 6372

Email:                                    camiliakumari_wankaner@Harvard.Edu

Assessment:                        Course assignments, no exam

Aims and objectives of STM103:

This course provides the analytical knowledge and practical skills to understand patterns of mass activism in democratic politics worldwide, including in established and newer democracies. The course covers the nature of mass belief systems, modes of political activism and protest politics, value change and ideological orientations, electoral behavior, the structure of political alignments, confidence in government, issues of political representation, and the implications of citizen politics for democratic institutions.

The first half of the course will review the research literature to understand the theoretical concepts and empirical literature. The second will then apply these in research projects using cross-national time-series survey datasets, such as the World Values Survey, the Afro-barometer, the Latin-Barometer, the Euro-Barometer, and the European Social Survey.  The course will also provide an introduction to using Stata and/or SPSS for survey analysis.

The course will be invaluable for any seeking to develop familiarity with the major theories of mass activism and the practical skills in analyzing survey data from the growing array of cross-national social surveys.

Class Schedule 2009:

Class

Date

Topic

Due dates (i)

 

 

Part I: Introduction: Analytical tools and datasets for social research

 

1

Wed 28 Jan

Overview:  Roadmap of the class

 

2

Mon 2nd Feb

The evolution of cross-national opinion research and data sources

 

3

Wed 4th Feb

Introduction to the first dataset: ISSP 2004 (GESIS) Lab exercise #1

 

4

Mon 9th Feb

Introduction to SPSS and Stata for survey analysis Lab exercise #2

 

 

 

Part II: Theories and evidence of citizen politics

 

5

Wed 11th Feb

Modes of political participation

#1 LabEx

6

Wed 18th Feb

Explanations of activism

 

7

Mon 23rd Feb

Values

 

8

Wed 25th Feb

Ideologies

 

9

Mon 2nd Mar

The social basis of party support: weakening cleavages?

 

10

Wed 4th Mar

Partisan loyalties and voting choice

 

11

Mon 9th Mar

Issue voting

 

12

Wed 11th Mar

Implications for democracy

 

 

 

Part III:  Analyzing citizen politics

 

13

Mon 16th Mar

Defining researchable questions

#2 LitRev

14

Wed 18th Mar

Introduction to cross-national datasets and archives: Lab exercise #3

 

15

Mon 30th Mar

Selecting suitable cross-national cases and identifying datasets

 

16

Wed 1st Apr

Reality checks and replication: Lab exercise #4

 

17

Mon 6th Apr

Professional presentation of multivariate analysis: Lab exercise #5

#3 LabEx

18

Wed 8th Apr

Effective graphics, figures and cases: Lab exercise #6

 

19

Mon 13th Apr

Group discussion of research designs

#4 Memo

20

Mon 20th Apr

Cross-national and time-series analysis

 

21

Wed 22nd Apr

Group discussion of draft report presentations

 

22

Mon 27th Apr

Contextual multi-level effects: Lab exercise #7

 

 

 

Conclusions

 

23

Wed 29th Apr

Conclusion & wrap up

# 5 Report

Note university holidays: No class will be held on President’s Day (M 16 Feb),  during spring break (21-29th March) or due to a conflict schedule involving international travel on Wed 15th Apr (i) Assignments are due to be handed in at the start of the class on these dates. Occasional guest speakers may be added to the schedule.

General points for all assignments:

  • Participants are expected to keep up with the required readings and to attend classes every Monday and Wednesday. 

  • Various survey dataset will be used in class for the lab exercises and the assignments. See the ‘links’ section of the class website for downloadable files.

  • Late policy: Barring an extraordinary excuse, all late assignments will be marked down a third of a grade (such as from A to A-) for each day following the due date.

  • Your assignments are designed to be crafted as professional reports, representing evidence-based policy analysis, rather than written as personal essays or standard academic papers.  The aim is to produce work which could be published by international agencies, multilateral organizations, bilateral donors, and national governments, as well as distributed internally within organizations. You need to consider how your work would be read and critiqued by representatives from governments and national stake-holders in the region. It needs to be carefully written and supported by direct evidence derived from the available datasets and from citations to existing research.

  • Communicate your argument in a clear, concise and effective manner, designed for a non-technical readership. These are not academic research papers designed for journal publication.

  • Use appendices and endnotes to explain more technical matters.

  • Use effective endnote references citing sources from the peer-reviewed research literature, as suggested from the extensive readings listed in the syllabi and others related publications.  Use endnotes to support any contentious claims, to provide your client with further sources of evidence, and to acknowledge any data sources.

  • Use professional graphs, figures and tables with clear, short descriptive titles, and with full explanatory notes and data sources below each one.

  • Integrate short, vivid cases and concrete illustrations to illustrate specific ‘good practice’ programs and strategies.

  • The standard you should seek to achieve is equivalent to the World Bank Development Report or the UNDP Human Development Report. Consult these sources to check the format and writing style.

1. The first two lab exercises. Submission deadline: 11th Feb (10%)

Details will be given out in class. The exercises will be problem sets which can be completed from the lab sessions.

2. The literature review report chosen from discussion topics listed in classes 5-12. Submission deadline: 16th March (20%)

Choose ONE of the discussion questions listed in the syllabus in classes 5-12. The literature review should draw upon the recommended readings and research literature on the selected topic listed in the syllabus, as well as upon any online resources and publications.

Your report should be structured with subheadings to cover the following topics: 

         I.      The executive summary of the plan of your report and the major conclusions;

        II.      Summary of the core topic;

      III.      Review of the literature organized thematically;

      IV.      Conclusions and implications;

       V.      Technical appendix (including longer tables, larger graphs/figures, definition of indicators and sources, if used.)

      VI.      Endnotes: comprehensive list of literature and references used in the report.

The discussions during class will provide some ideas on these topics and you are encouraged to work collaboratively with others, but each student should submit his or her own report for an individual grade. The report should be about 2,500-3,000 words in length in professional format. More details will be given out in class nearer the deadline.

3. The next two lab exercises. Submission deadline: 6th April (10%)

Details will be given out in class. The exercises will be problem sets which can be completed from the lab sessions.

4. Research design memo. Submission deadline:  13th April (10%)

You are asked to produce a 3-4 page memo summarizing your research project. The memos will be presented in small groups in class to generate feedback and discussion. Your memo should use the following sub-heads:

         I.      The executive summary of the plan of your report and the major propositions;

        II.      Summary of the core topic under investigation;

      III.      Summary of the literature/arguments;

      IV.      Summary of the dataset, questions, and methods used for analysis;

       V.      Conclusions and next steps;

      VI.      Technical appendix (including longer tables, larger graphs/figures, definition of indicators and sources, and any multivariate analysis tables, if used.)

    VII.      Endnotes: comprehensive list of literature and references used in the report.

5. Final research report. Submission deadline: 29th April. (40%)

You are asked to develop a complete research report which integrates what you have learnt throughout the class. The reports should be 15-25 pages in length, using the following subheadings:

         I.      The executive summary of the plan of your report and the major propositions;

        II.      Summary of the core topic under investigation;

      III.      Summary of the literature/arguments;

      IV.      Summary of the dataset, questions, and methods used for analysis;

       V.      Analysis and major findings

      VI.      Conclusions and implications;

    VII.      Technical appendix (including longer tables, larger graphs/figures, definition of indicators and sources, and any multivariate analysis tables, if used.)

   VIII.      Endnotes: comprehensive list of literature and references used in the report.

6. Class Participation (10%)

Lastly, everyone will be expected to participate in class, including through brief class exercises. Sessions will involve discussing the readings, group exercises, report presentations, case studies, and debates about controversial issues.

 

You should plan to purchase the following available from Amazon, the Harvard Coop, and other bookshops.

Russell J. Dalton. 2008. Citizen Politics: Public opinion and political parties in advanced industrialized democracies. Washington DC, CQ Press. ISBN: 9 780872895379.

Glenn Firebaugh. 2008. Seven Rules for Social Research. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press. ISBN: 9780691135670.

 

 

Part I: Introduction: Analytical tools and datasets for social research

 

1

Wed 28 Jan

Overview:  Roadmap of the class

 

 

Discussion topics

·         Why have cross-national social and public opinion surveys expanded so rapidly since the early-1990s?

·         What are the major pros and cons of using social surveys to gauge public assessments of the quality of governance?

 

 

Required readings

None

 

 

Recommended supplementary resources

Russell J. Dalton. 2008. Citizen Politics: Public opinion and political parties in advanced industrialized democracies. Washington DC, CQ Press. ISBN: 9 780872895379. Ch 1

 

2

Mon 2nd Feb

The evolution of cross-national opinion research and data sources

 

 

Discussion topics

·         What are the challenges of questionnaire measurement validity in cross-national survey research? What techniques can help to minimize these problems?

·         Can social and public opinion surveys be conducted with any degree of reliability in states lacking the conditions of freedom of expression?

 

 

Required readings

Norris, Pippa. 2008. ‘The Globalization of Comparative Public Opinion Research.’ For the Sage Handbook of Comparative Politics Eds. Neil Robinson and Todd Landman. London: Sage Publications. Available at www.pippanorris.com

 

 

Recommended supplementary resources

Almond, Gabriel A. and Sidney Verba. 1963. The Civic Culture: Political Attitudes and Democracy in Five Nations. Princeton: Princeton University Press.

Almond, Gabriel and Sidney Verba. Eds. 1980. The Civic Culture Revisited. Boston: Little Brown.

Bulmer, M. (1986) The Chicago School of Sociology: Institutionalization, Diversity, and the Rise of Sociological Research. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.

Bulmer, M. (1993) Social Research in Developing Countries: Surveys and Censuses in the Third World. London: Routledge.

Bulmer, M. (1998) ‘The problem of exporting social survey research’, The American Behavioral Scientist 42(2): 153-167.

Bulmer, M., Bales, K. and Sklar, K.K. (eds) (1992) The social survey in historical perspective, 1880-1940. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Converse, Jean M. (1987) Survey research in the United States: Roots and emergence 1890-1960. Berkeley: University of California Press

Donsbach, Wolfgang and Michael Traugott (2008) The SAGE Handbook of Public Opinion Research. List of resources. http://www.gesis.org/en/data_service/eurobarometer/handbook/index.htm

Geer, John (ed.) (2004) Public Opinion and Polling around the World: A Historical Encyclopedia.  Santa Barbara, CA: ABC-Clio.

Heath, Anthony, Fisher, Stephen and Smith, Shawna (2005) ‘The globalization of public opinion research’, Annual Review of Political Studies 8: 297-333.

Jowell, Roger (1998) ‘How comparative is comparative research?’, American Behavioral Scientist, 42, 168-177.

Jowell, Roger, Brook, Lindsay and Dowds, Lizanne (eds) (1993) International Social Attitudes: The 10th British Social Attitudes Report. Dartmouth.

Kuechler, Manfred (1987) ‘The utility of surveys for cross-national research’, Social Science Research, 16, 229-244.

Kuechler, Manfred (1998) ‘The survey method: An indispensable tool for social science research everywhere?’, American Behavioral Scientist 42(2): 178-200.

van Deth, Jan. (ed.) (1998) Comparative Politics: The Problem of Equivalence. London: Routledge.

Verba, Sidney (1971) ‘Cross-national survey research: the problem of credibility’. In I. Vallier (ed.), Comparative methods in sociology: Essays on trends and applications. Berkeley: University of California Press.

 

 

Online resources

(see also the 'resources' link on the API414 website)

Asia Barometer www.eastasiabarometer.org and http://www.asianbarometer.org/

EuroBarometer http://europa.eu.int/comm/public_opinion/

European Social Survey http://naticent02.uuhost.uk.uu.net

Gallup International Voice of the People  www.voice-of-the-people.net/

Global barometers http://www.globalbarometer.net/

International Social Survey Program http://www.issp.org/

Latinobarometro www.latinobarometro.org

New Europe Barometer www.cspp.strath.ac.uk

Pew Global Surveys http://pewglobal.org/

World Values Study 1981-2005  http://www.worldvaluessurvey.org/

World Public Opinion http://www.worldpublicopinion.org/

 

3

Wed 4th Feb

Introduction to the first dataset: ISSP 2004 (GESIS) Lab exercise #1

 

 

Discussion topics

·         What concepts of citizen engagement underlie the questionnaire design in the 2004 ISSP? What forms of engagement are excluded?

·         What underlying normative notions of democracy are implicit in the design of the ISSP 2004?

·         What are the potential sources of measurement error arising from the research design of the ISSP?

 

 

Required readings

Overview of topics, variables and questions (top item), the full codebook and the data for the International Social Survey Program (ISSP) 2004 survey are available for downloading from:

http://www.gesis.org/en/services/data/survey-data/issp/modules-study-overview/citizenship/

Lab exercises will use ZACAT, the online facility as GESIS to run some simple descriptive statistics for the ISSP2004, including frequencies and cross-tabs. No familiarity with the program is needed before this session.

 

 

Recommended supplementary resources

Jowell, Roger, Caroline Roberts, Rory Fitzgerald and Gillian Eva. Eds. 2007. Measuring Attitudes Cross-nationally. London: Sage Publications.

 

4

Mon 9th Feb

Introduction to SPSS and Stata for survey analysis Lab exercise #2

 

 

Required readings

Overview of topics, variables and questions (top item), the full codebook and the data for the International Social Survey Program (ISSP) 2004 survey are available for downloading from:

http://www.gesis.org/en/services/data/survey-data/issp/modules-study-overview/citizenship/

Introductory Guide to Using Stata  

Introductory Guide to Using SPSS  

Introduction to using the Web of Science for literature reviews. Click here for access to the SSCI Web of Science

 

 

 

Part II: Theories and evidence of citizen politics

 

5

Wed 11th Feb

Modes of political participation

#1

 

Discussion topics

·         Does the traditional distinction between ‘conventional’ and ‘protest’ politics still make sense?

·         What measures of citizen engagement are available in social surveys and what aspects of contemporary activism are lacking?

·         How would you construct reliable scales of citizen activism from the ISSP-2004?

 

 

Required readings

Russell J. Dalton. 2008. Citizen Politics: Public opinion and political parties in advanced industrialized democracies. Washington DC, CQ Press. ISBN: 9 780872895379. Ch 3

Norris, Pippa. 2009. ‘Political activism: New challenges, new opportunities.’ For the Oxford Handbook of Comparative Politics Edited by Carles Boix and Susan Stokes (Oxford University Press). Available at www.pippanorris.com

 

 

Recommended supplementary resources

Adrian, Charles and David A. Apter. 1995. Political Protest and Social Change: Analyzing Politics. NY: New York University Press.

Almond, Gabriel A.  and Sidney Verba. 1989 [1963].The Civic Culture: Political Attitudes and Democracy in Five Nations. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.

Almond, Gabriel A.  and Sidney Verba. Eds. 1980. The Civic Culture Revisited. Boston: Little Brown.

Barnes, Samuel and Max Kaase. 1979. Political Action: Mass Participation in Five Western Democracies. Beverley Hills, CA: Sage.

Blais, André and A. Dobrzynska. 1998. ‘Turnout in electoral democracies.’ European Journal of Political Research. 33(2): 239-261.

Blais, André. 2000. To Vote or Not to Vote? The Merits and Limits of Rational Choice Theory. Pittsburgh: University of Pittsburgh Press.

Burns, Nancy, Kay Lehman Schlozman and Sidney Verba. 2001. The Private Roots of Public Action. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.

Dalton, Russell J. 2009. The Good Citizen: How a Younger Generation is Reshaping American Politics. Washington, DC: CQ Press.

Franklin, Mark N. 2004. Voter Turnout and the Dynamics of Electoral Competition in Established Democracies Since 1945. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Jackman, Robert W.  and Ross A. Miller. 1995. ‘Voter Turnout in the Industrial Democracies during the 1980s.’ Comparative Political Studies, 27: 467-92.

Jennings, M. Kent and Jan van Deth. 1989. Continuities in Political Action. Berlin: deGruyter.

Marsh, Alan. 1977. Protest and Political Consciousness. Beverly Hills, CA: Sage

McDonald, Michael P.  and Samuel L. Popkin. 2001. ‘The myth of the vanishing voter.’ American Political Science Review 95 (4): 963-974.

Norris, Pippa. 2002. Democratic Phoenix: Reinventing Political Activism. New York: Cambridge University Press.

Norris, Pippa. 2004 Electoral Engineering: Voting Rules and Political Behavior. New York: Cambridge University Press.

Pintor, Rafael Lopez and Maria Gratschew. 2004. Voter Turnout Since 1945: A Global Report. Stockholm, International IDEA.   www.idea.int

Powell, G. Bingham. 1980. ‘Voting turnout in thirty democracies: Partisan, legal and socioeconomic influences.’ In Electoral Participation: A Comparative Analysis. Ed. Richard Rose. London: Sage

Putnam, Robert D. 2000. Bowling Alone: The Collapse and Revival of American Community. NY: Simon and Schuster.

Putnam, Robert D.. Ed. 2002. The Dynamics of Social Capital. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Rosenstone, Steve and Mark Hansen. 1993. Mobilization, participation, and American democracy. Wasinton DC: CQ Press.

Verba, Sidney and Norman H. Nie. 1972. Participation in America: political democracy and social equality. University of Chicago Press, Chicago, IL.

Verba, Sidney, Kay Schlozman and Henry E. Brady. 1995. Voice and Equality: Civic Voluntarism in American Politics. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.

Verba, Sidney, Norman H. Nie and Jae-on Kim. 1978. Participation and Political Equality: A Seven-Nation Comparison. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

 

6

Wed 18th Feb

Explanations of activism

 

 

Discussion topics

·         What are the strengths and limitations of the civic volunteerism model suggested by Verba and colleagues?

·         How far can we generalize from explanations of turnout to analyze other dimensions of civic activism?

·         Is turnout eroding?

 

 

Required readings

Russell J. Dalton. 2008. Citizen Politics: Public opinion and political parties in advanced industrialized democracies. Washington DC, CQ Press. ISBN: 9 780872895379. Ch 4

 

 

Recommended supplementary resources

See class 5

 

7

Mon 23rd Feb

Values

 

 

Discussion topics

·         What is Inglehart’s theory of the cultural roots of democratic regimes?

·         Is support for democracy a universal value?

 

 

Required readings

Russell J. Dalton. 2008. Citizen Politics: Public opinion and political parties in advanced industrialized democracies. Washington DC, CQ Press. ISBN: 9 780872895379. Ch 5

 

 

Recommended supplementary resources

Almond, Gabriel A. and Sidney Verba. 1963. The Civic Culture: Political Attitudes and Democracy in Five Nations. Princeton: Princeton University Press.

Almond, Gabriel and Sidney Verba. Eds. 1980. The Civic Culture Revisited. Boston: Little Brown.

Diamond, Larry and Marc F. Plattner.  2008. Eds. How People View Democracy. Baltimore, MD: Johns Hopkins Press.

Inglehart, Ronald and Christopher Welzel. 2003. ‘Political culture and democracy - Analyzing cross-level linkages.’ Comparative Politics 36 (1): 61-+.

Inglehart, Ronald and Christopher Welzel. 2005. Modernization, Cultural Change, and Democracy: The Human Development Sequence. New York: Cambridge University Press. 

Inglehart, Ronald. 2000. Modernization and Postmodernization. Princeton, N.J: Princeton University Press.

Inglehart, Ronald. 2003. ‘How Solid is Mass Support for Democracy and How Do We Measure It?’  PS: Political Science and Politics.

Inglehart, Ronald, Basàñez, Miguel, Dìez-Medrano, Jaime, Halman, Loek and Luijkx, Ruud (eds).2004. Human Beliefs and Values: A cross-cultural sourcebook. Mexico: Siglo XXI Editores.

Inglehart, Ronald and Pippa Norris. 2003. Rising Tide: Gender Equality and Cultural Change around the World. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Sarsfield, R. and F. Echegaray. 2006. ‘Opening the black box: How satisfaction with democracy and its perceived efficacy affect regime preference in Latin America.’ International Journal of Public Opinion Research 18 (2): 153-173

Seligson, Mitchell. A. 2002.  ‘The renaissance of political culture or the renaissance of the ecological fallacy?’ Comparative Politics. 34 (3): 273.

Tessler, Mark and E. Gao E. 2005. ‘Gauging Arab support for democracy Journal Of Democracy 16 (3): 83-97.

Welzel, Chris, Ronald Inglehart, and Hans-Dieter Klingemann. 2003. ‘The theory of human development: A cross-cultural analysis.’ European Journal of Political Research 42 (3): 341-379.

 

8

Wed 25th Feb

Ideologies

 

 

Discussion topics

·         Is there a coherent cluster of attitudes and values associated with left-right ideological orientations?

·         What are the core values associated with societal modernization?

·         Is modernization associated with the ‘end of ideology’ (Bell) or only the end of ‘left-right’ ideological values?

 

 

Required readings

Russell J. Dalton. 2008. Citizen Politics: Public opinion and political parties in advanced industrialized democracies. Washington DC, CQ Press. ISBN: 9 780872895379. Ch 5

 

 

Recommended supplementary resources

See class 7 plus

Bell, Daniel. 1999. The Coming of Post-Industrial Society: A Venture in Social Forecasting. New York: Basic Books. (1st edition 1973)

Klingemann, Hans-Dieter. 1979. ‘Measuring ideological conceptualizations.’ In Political Action. Eds. Samuel Barnes and Max Kaase et al. Beverley Hills, CA: Sage Publications.

Fuchs, Dieter and Hans-Dieter Klingemann. 1989. ‘The Left-Right Schema.’ In Continuities in Political Action. Eds. M. Kent Jennings and Jan van Deth. Berlin: de Gruyter.

 

9

Mon 2nd Mar

The social basis of party support: weakening cleavages?

 

 

Discussion topics

·         Are traditional social cleavages weakening or being reinvented as cues for voting behavior and party choice?

·         Is class still relevant for voting behavior?

 

 

Required readings

Russell J. Dalton. 2008. Citizen Politics: Public opinion and political parties in advanced industrialized democracies. Washington DC, CQ Press. ISBN: 9 780872895379. Ch 7 and 8

 

 

Recommended supplementary resources

Alford, Robert R.  1967. ‘Class Voting in the Anglo-American Political Systems.’ In Party Systems and Voter Alignments: Cross National Perspectives, ed. Seymour M. Lipset and Stein Rokkan. New York: The Free Press.

Dalton, Russell and Hans-Dieter Klingemann, eds. Oxford Handbook of Political Behavior. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Evans, Geoffrey. 1999. The End of Class Politics? Ed. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Evans, Geoffrey. 2000. ‘The continued significance of class voting.’  Annual Review of Political Science 3: 401-417

Franklin, Mark, Tom Mackie, Henry Valen, et al. 1992. Electoral Change: Responses to Evolving Social and Attitudinal Structures in Western Countries. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Gunther, Richard, Puhle, Hans-Jürgen and Montero, José Ramón (eds) (2007) Democracy, Intermediation, and Voting on Four Continents. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Inglehart, Ronald and Pippa Norris. 2003. Rising Tide. New York: Cambridge University Press.

Jelen, Ted Gerard and Clyde Wilcox.  Eds. 2002. Religion and Politics in Comparative Perspective. New York: Cambridge University Press.

Kaase, Max and Newton, Kenneth (1995) Beliefs in Government. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Kitschelt, Herbert. 1994. The Transformation of European Social Democracy. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Knutsen, Oddbjorn. 2006. Class Voting in Western Europe: A Comparative Longitudinal Study. Latham, MD: Lexington Books.

Lipset, Seymour Martin and Stein Rokkan. 1967.  Party Systems and Voter Alignments. New York: Free Press.

Nieuwbeerta, Paul. 1995. The Democratic Class Struggle in Twenty Countries 1945-90. Amsterdam Thesis Publishers.

Norris, Pippa and Ronald Inglehart. 2005. Sacred and Secular. New York: Cambridge University Press.

Norris, Pippa. 2004.  Electoral Engineering. New York: Cambridge University Press.

Thomassen, Jacques (ed.) (2005) The European Voter.  Oxford: Oxford University Press.

 

10

Wed 4th Mar

Partisan loyalties and voting choice

 

 

Discussion topics

·         Is there good evidence that mass partisan loyalties have eroded in established and newer democracies?

·         Does the concept of partisan identification provide a useful analytical tool in Western European democracies?

 

 

Required readings

Russell J. Dalton. 2008. Citizen Politics: Public opinion and political parties in advanced industrialized democracies. Washington DC, CQ Press. ISBN: 9 780872895379. Ch  9

 

 

Recommended supplementary resources

See class 9 plus

Campbell, Angus , Philip Converse, Warren Miller, and Donald Stokes. 1960. The American Voter. University of Chicago Press.

Clarke, Harold, and Marianne Stewart. 1998. ‘The decline of parties in the minds of citizens.’ Annual Review of Political Science 1: 357-78.

Converse, Philip. 1964. ‘The nature of belief systems in mass publics.’ In David Apter, eds. Ideology and Discontent. New York: Free Press.

Crewe, Ivor, Jim Alt and Bo Sarlvik. 1977. ‘Partisan dealignment in Britain 1964-1974.’ British Journal of Political Science 7: 129-90;

Crewe,Ivor and David Denver. Eds. 1985. Electoral Change in Western Democracies: Patterns and Sources of Electoral Volatility. New York: St. Martin's Press

Dalton, Russell and Hans-Dieter Klingemann, eds. Oxford Handbook of Political Behavior. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Dalton, Russell, and Martin P. Wattenberg. Ed. 2000. Parties without Partisans: Political Change in Advanced Industrial Democracies. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Diamond, Larry and Richard Gunther. 2001. Political Parties and Democracy. Johns Hopkins Press.

Green, Donald, Bradley Palmquist, and Eric Schickler. 2002. Partisan Hearts and Minds: Political Parties and the Social Identities of Voters. New Haven, CT: Yale University Press.

Gunther, Richard, Jose Ramon Montero and Joan J. Linz. 2002. Political Parties: Old Concepts and New Challenges. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Holmberg, Sören. 1994. Party identification compared across the Atlantic. In M. Kent Jennings and Thomas Mann, eds., Elections at Home and Abroad. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press.

Kitschelt, Herbert, Zdenka Mansfeldova, Radoslaw Markowski and Gabor Toka. 1999. Post-Communist Party Systems. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Kitschelt, Herbert. 1994. The Transformation of European Social Democracy. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Lewis-Beck, Michael, Helmut Norpoth, William G. Jacoby, and Herbert F. Weisberg. 2008. The American Voter Revisited. University of Michigan Press.

Lipset, Seymour Martin and Stein Rokkan. 1967.  Party Systems and Voter Alignments. New York: Free Press.

Nie, Norman, Sidney Verba and John Petrocik. 1976. The Changing American Voter. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.

Rose, Richard and Derek W. Urwin 1970. ‘Persistence and Change in Western Party Systems Since 1945.’ Political Studies 18:287-319.

Toka, Gabor. 1998. Party appeals and voter loyalty in new democracies. In Richard Hofferbert, ed. Parties and Democracy. Oxford: Blackwell.

 

11

Mon 9th Mar

Issues, leaders, and performance voting

 

 

Discussion topics

·         Are short-term factors (including issues, leaders, government performance, and media campaigns) increasingly significant drivers in voting behavior?

 

 

Required readings

Russell J. Dalton. 2008. Citizen Politics: Public opinion and political parties in advanced industrialized democracies. Washington DC, CQ Press. ISBN: 9 780872895379. Ch 10

 

 

Recommended supplementary resources

Aarts, Kees, Andre Blais, and Hermann Schmitt. 2005. Political Leaders and Democratic Elections. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Anderson, Christopher. 1995. Blaming the Government: Citizens and the Economy in Five European Democracies. Armonk, NY: M.E. Sharpe

Dalton, Russell and Hans-Dieter Klingemann, eds. Oxford Handbook of Political Behavior. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Voltmer, Katrin. Ed. 2006.  Mass media and political communication in new democracies. London: Routledge.

 

12

Wed 11th Mar

Implications for democracy

  #2

 

Discussion topics

·         What are the implications of cultural change for democratic values and attitudes?

·         Is there good evidence for the ‘critical citizens’ thesis?

 

 

Required readings

Russell J. Dalton. 2008. Citizen Politics: Public opinion and political parties in advanced industrialized democracies. Washington DC, CQ Press. ISBN: 9 780872895379. Ch 12

 

 

Recommended supplementary resources

Anderson, Christopher J., and Christine A. Guillory. 1997. “Political Institutions and Satisfaction With Democracy.” American Political Science Review 91(1):66-81.

Anderson, Christopher. 1995. Blaming the Government: Citizens and the Economy in Five European Democracies. New York: M.E.Sharpe.

Citrin, Jack. 1974. “Comment: The Political Relevance of Trust in Government.” American Political Science Review 68:973-88.

Craig, Stephen C. 1993. The Malevolent Leaders: Popular Discontent in America. Boulder, CO.: Westview Press.

Crozier, Michel, Samuel P. Huntington, and Joji Watanuki. 1975. The Crisis of Democracy: Report on the Governability of Democracies to the Trilateral Commission. New York: New York University Press.

Easton, David. 1975. “A Reassessment of the Concept of Political Support.” British Journal of Political Science, 5:435-57.

Fuchs, Dieter, Giovanna Guidorossi, and Palle Svensson. 1995. “Support for the Democratic System.”  In Citizens and the State, eds. Klingemann, Hans-Dieter and Fuchs, Dieter. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Kaase, Max, and Kenneth Newton.  1995.  Beliefs in Government.  New York:  Oxford University Press.

Lipset, Seymour M., and William C. Schneider. 1987. The Confidence Gap: Business, Labor, and Government in the Public Mind, rev. ed. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press.

Listhaug, Ola, and Matti Wiberg. 1995. “Confidence in Political and Private Institutions.” In Citizens and the State, eds. Hans-Dieter Klingemann and Dieter Fuchs. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Listhaug, Ola. 1995. “The Dynamics of Trust in Politicians.” In Citizens and the State, eds. Hans-Dieter Klingemann and Dieter Fuchs. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Miller, Arthur H.  1974a.  “Political Issues and Trust in Government, 1964-1970.”  American Political Science Review 68: 951-72.

Miller, Arthur H. 1974b. “Rejoinder to 'Comment' by Jack Citrin: Political Discontent or Ritualism?.” American Political Science Review 68:989-1001.

Norris, Pippa. Ed. 1999. Critical Citizens. New York: OUP.

Nye, Joseph S. 1997. “Introduction: The Decline Of Confidence In Government.” In Why People Don't Trust Government, eds. Joseph S. Nye, Philip D. Zelikow, and David C. King. Cambridge: Harvard University Press.

Putnam, Robert D. 1995a. “Bowling Alone: America's Declining Social Capital.” Journal of Democracy 6:65-78.

Putnam, Robert D. 1995b. “Tuning In, Tuning Out: The Strange Disappearance of Social Capital in America.” P.S.: Political Science and Politics XXVIII(4):664-83.

 

 

 

Part III:  Analyzing citizen politics

 

13

Mon 16th Mar

Defining researchable questions

#2LitRev

 

Discussion topics

·         What are the key research issues emerging from your readings in Part II of the class which you want to develop as your research report?

·         What are the key testable empirical propositions which you want to examine?

·         How would you seek to operationalize the key concepts?

 

 

Required readings

Firebaugh, Glenn. 2008. Seven Rules for Social Research. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press. ISBN: 9780691135670. Chs 1 and 2

 

14

Wed 18th Mar

Introduction to cross-national survey datasets and data archives: Applied Lab Exercise #3

 

 

Required readings

Prior to the class you should consider which dataset you want to use, browse the following, and download the codebook and technical details.

 

 

Online resources

Asia Barometer www.eastasiabarometer.org and http://www.asianbarometer.org/

EuroBarometer http://europa.eu.int/comm/public_opinion/

European Social Survey http://naticent02.uuhost.uk.uu.net

Gallup International Voice of the People  www.voice-of-the-people.net/

Global barometers http://www.globalbarometer.net/

International Social Survey Program http://www.issp.org/

Latinobarometro www.latinobarometro.org

New Europe Barometer www.cspp.strath.ac.uk

Pew Global Surveys http://pewglobal.org/

World Values Study 1981-2005  http://www.worldvaluessurvey.org/

World Public Opinion http://www.worldpublicopinion.org/

 

14

Mon 30th Mar

Selecting suitable cross-national cases and datasets

 

 

Discussion topics

·         What are the main criteria you recommend in selecting cases and why?

·         What are the advantages and disadvantages of the ‘most similar’ and the ‘most different’ research designs?

 

 

Required readings

Firebaugh, Glenn. 2008. Seven Rules for Social Research. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press. ISBN: 9780691135670. Ch5

 

 

Recommended supplementary resources

Boix, Carles and Susan Stokes. Eds. 2007. The Oxford Handbook of Comparative Politics. Oxford University Press.

Brady, Henry and David Collier. 2004. Rethinking social inquiry: Diverse tools, shared standards. New York: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.

Collier, David, James Mahoney and Jason Seawright. 2004. ‘Claiming too much: Warnings about selection bias.’ In Rethinking Social Inquiry: Diverse Tools,Shared Standards. Ed. Henry E. Brady and David Collier. Lanham, MD: Rowman and Littlefield.

Collier, David. ‘The comparative method’. In Political Science: The State of the Discipline ed A. W.Finifter. Washington DC: APSA.

Geddes, Barbara. 2003. Paradigms and Sand Castles: Theory building and research design in comparative politics. Chapter 3. Ann Arbor, MI: The University of Michigan Press.

George, Alexander L.  and Andrew Bennett. 2004. Case Studies and Theory Development. Cambridge, MA: The MIT Press.

Geering, John. 2007. Case Study research: Principles and Practices. Cambridge University Press.

King, Gary, Robert Keohane et al. 1994. Designing Social Inquiry. Princeton: Princeton University Press.

Munck, Geraldo and R. Snyder. Eds. 2007. Passion, Craft and Method in Comparative Politics. Baltimore: The Johns Hopkins Press.

Przeworski, Adam and H. Teune. 1970. The Logic of Comparative Social Inquiry. R.E.Kreiger.

Ragin, Charles C. 2000. Fuzzy-Set Social Science. Chicago: University of Chicago.

 

16

Wed 1st Apr

Reality checks and replications: Lab exercise #4

 

 

Discussion topics

·         What are the main potential sources of error in terms of sampling, measurement, coverage and non-response? What techniques are appropriate to guard against these errors?

·         How can multi-method approaches help interpret the meaning of survey results?

 

 

Required readings

Firebaugh, Glenn. 2008. Seven Rules for Social Research. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press. ISBN: 9780691135670. Ch 3 and 4

 

17

Mon 6th Apr

Professional presentation of multivariate analysis: Applied Lab exercises #5

 

 

Required readings

Miller, Jane E.  2005. The Chicago Guide to Writing about Multivariate Analysis. University of Chicago Press. (extract)

 

18

Wed 8th Apr

Effective graphics, figures and cases:  Applied Lab exercises #6

#3LabEx

 

Required readings

Lab exercise

 

19

Mon 13th Apr

Group discussions of research design

 #4 memo

 

 Required readings

Workgroup discussions of your research design memos

 

15

Mon 20th Apr

Cross-national and time-series analysis

 

 

Discussion topics

·         What are the key challenges in cross-national time-series analysis?

 

 

Required readings

Firebaugh, Glenn. 2008. Seven Rules for Social Research. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press. ISBN: 9780691135670. Ch6

 

 

Recommended supplementary resources

Beck, Nathaniel and Jonathan Katz. 1995. ‘What to do (and not to do) with Time-Series Cross-Section Data.’ American Political Science Review. 89: 634-647.

Beck, Nathaniel and Jonathan Katz. 1996. ‘Nuisance vs. substance: Specifying and estimating time-series cross-sectional models.’ In Political Analysis Ed. J. Freeman. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press.

Hsiao, Cheng M. 1986. Analysis of panel data. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Stimson, James A. 1985. ‘Regression in time and space: A statistical essay.’ American Journal of Political Science 29:914–47.

Wilson, Sven E.  and David M. Butler. 2007. ‘A lot more to do: The sensitivity of time-series cross-section analyses to simple alternative specifications.’ Political Analysis 15 (2): 101-123.

 

21

Wed 22nd Apr

Group discussion of draft report presentations

 

 

Required readings

Workgroup discussion of your draft report presentations

 

22

Mon 27th Apr

Contextual Multilevel effects: Applied Lab exercise #7

 

 

Required readings

Firebaugh, Glenn. 2008. Seven Rules for Social Research. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press. ISBN: 9780691135670. Ch7

 

 

 

Conclusions

 

23

Wed 29th Apr

Conclusion & wrap up

# 5 Report

 
 
 
Copyright 2004 Pippa Norris, John F. Kennedy School of Government, Harvard University, Cambridge MA 02138. www.pippanorris.com

Last updated 12/05/2009