Pippa Norris Harvard University Classes with full syllabi, class notes and further resources
Pippa Norris Teaching www.pippanorris.com

John F. Kennedy School of Government, Harvard University

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Classes 2010-2011
  The syllabi, class notes, and further resources are provided on the home pages for each of these classes (click below).
GOVT6150

GOVT6150 Comparative Democratic Politics Mar-May 2011
This University of Sydney course compares:

  1. The principles, processes, and goals of constitutional design;
  2. The mechanisms of institutional design including the basic type of electoral system and issues of electoral management, the design of parliamentary and presidential executives, the decentralization of power in unitary or federal states, and innovative mechanisms designed to strengthen transparency, accountability, direct participation, and deliberation;
  3. The political processes determining institutional choices;
  4. The consequences of institutional design, including for prosperity, welfare, peace and democracy. 


GOVT4101

GOVT4101 Comparative Political Culture Mar-May 2011

This University of Sydney course covers the following topics. What is political culture and how can we best understand the predominant norms, values, attitudes and beliefs in societies worldwide? Are processes of generational change transforming attitudes towards sexuality and gender equality in Europe? Is there such a phenomenon as ‘Asian values’? Is there universal support for democracy, even in autocratic societies and in Arab states? Is religion gradually fading in importance – or experiencing a contemporary resurgence? Do cultural differences over fundamental values lie at the heart of any revival of Islamophobia? And is Australian culture part of an ‘Anglosphere’ (Bennett), with common values shared with Canada, the UK, the United States, Ireland and New Zealand?
To explore these sorts of issues, this unit provides the theoretical knowledge and analytical skills to understand political culture in global perspective. The unit has three major sections:

  1. Theories and methods for studying and comparing political culture;
  2. Major themes in the comparative study of political culture, including understanding support for democracy and trust in government, religiosity and secularization, sexuality and gender equality, and globalization); and
  3. Theories and evidence about the consequences and impact of political culture.

The course will be invaluable for any seeking to develop familiarity with the major theories of political culture and the growing array of cross-national surveys.

DPI-403

DPI-403 Democratic governance Fall 2010 (updated)

 

This course provides insights into why democratic governance matters, discusses what performance indicators and analytical benchmarks are available, compares what strategies have commonly been implemented by a range of different agencies, and applies policy recommendations to specific cases. It covers the core principles, analytical theories, practical tools, and applied methods useful for understanding these issues. 

 

Gov-1109

Gov-1109 Comparative Institutional Design Fall 2010

This course compares:
(i) The principles, processes, and goals of constitutional design;
(ii) The mechanisms of institutional design including the basic type of electoral system and issues of electoral management,  the design of parliamentary and presidential executives, the decentralization of power in unitary or federal states, and innovative mechanisms designed to strengthen transparency, accountability, direct participation, and deliberation;
 (iii)The consequences of institutional design, including for prosperity, welfare, peace and democracy. 
Materials will utilize large-scale global comparisons, as well as selected historical case studies of processes of constitutional adoption and institutional change in countries worldwide. The course compares institutions within established democracies, as well as in third wave democracies and in divided societies emerging from conflict. Role playing exercises will also be included.

 

Classes from previous years

The syllabi are provided for these courses but not all the class notes or further resources

DPI-413

DPI-413  Challenges of democratization Spring 2010

 

Examines the key challenges facing democratization in the 21st Century.  Covers such questions as:  I What democratic indices are available, and what do they indicate about worldwide trends in democratization? II What is the role of institutions in democratization, including constitutions, parties, the media, the electoral system, types of executives, and federalism? III What is the impact of political culture and social capital on democracy? The course takes a broadly comparative perspective, looking at both established and emerging democracies from all regions of the world.

DPI-415

DPI-415 Comparative Politics in Global Perspective Spring 2010

 

This course analyzes the key challenges of comparative politics in global perspective. Topics include alternative theoretical perspectives, comparative methods, and governance indicators; processes of regime transition and state-building; the design of governance institutions; political culture and mass mobilization; and governance performance. Cases are drawn from all regions in the world.

API-414 API414 Citizen Politics Spring 2009

This course provides the analytical knowledge and practical skills to understand patterns of mass activism in democratic politics worldwide, including in established and newer democracies. The course covers the nature of mass belief systems, modes of political activism and protest politics, value change and ideological orientations, electoral behavior, the structure of political alignments, confidence in government, issues of political representation, and the implications of citizen politics for democratic institutions.

 

The first half reviews the research literature and the second  applies these in projects using cross-national time-series survey datasets, such as the World Values Survey, the Afro-barometer, the Latin-Barometer, the Euro-Barometer, and the European Social Survey. The course provides an introduction to using Stata and/or SPSS for survey analysis.

Gov20 Gov-20 Introduction to Comparative Politics Fall 2005

This FAS course for undergraduates in the Government Department provides an introduction to key theoretical frameworks, concepts, and analytical methods commonly used today in comparative politics. The class focuses upon some of the seminal contemporary works in the field and evaluates them in the light of the arguments of their critics.

 

API216

API216 Analyzing elections and public opinion Spring 2004

This course provides the core conceptual tools, theoretical insights, and practical skills for analyzing elections, voting behavior, and public opinion. It is designed for careers in public opinion polling and survey research, campaign management, broadcasting and journalism, and as the foundation for policy analysis research.

PPP-185

PPP185 Internet design for democracy Fall 2001

The course for MPA/MPP students focuses on the problem of the democratic divide, and the practical steps and applied techniques that can be used to maximize the democratic potential of the new technology. For enthusiasts, the Internet promises to provide new forms of horizontal and vertical communication that will enrich engagement, deliberation and democracy in the public sphere. But will Internet resources be open to everyone? The central issue generating widespread concern in the emergent Information Age has been indications of a growing ‘digital divide’ between Internet-haves and have-nots.  A global divide has become strikingly evident in the chasm between industrialized and developing societies. A social divide is apparent in the access of rich and poor in each nation, as well as by generation, race and gender. And within the online community, a democratic divide is emerging between those who do, and do not, use Internet resources to engage, mobilize, and participate in public life. This courses focuses on understanding these issues and what can be done in practice via the Net to promote opportunities for effective civic engagement and democratic policymaking.

PPP-412

PPP-412 Political Communication in Comparative Perspective

Globalization and new technologies are rapidly transforming the process of political communications around the world. The end of the Television Age and the rise of the Internet Era raises many issues: are newspapers and television as we know them in terminal decline, as some expect, or will the Internet just supplement, not replace, the old media? Are parties and elections being transformed by new forms of campaign communications? What are the effects of newspapers, television, the Net and party campaigns on civic engagement? Are the new communication technologies producing a ‘globalization’ or ‘Americanization’ of popular culture, or a more complex localization and fragmentation of media outlets and local identities? And what are the consequences of all these developments for the process of governance in a wired world?

This course provides new insights and practical analysis to understand these issues focusing on recent developments in the structure, contents and impact of political communications in many countries around the world. A wide range of post-industrial and developing countries are compared, including the United States. Your policy analysis report focuses on one of issues covered in the course in the country(s)/region of your choice.

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Last updated 12/06/2009