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DPI-415

Comparative politics

in global perspective

Spring 2010

Pippa Norris

Website: www.pippanorris.com

Contents

Class time:                 Mondays and Wednesdays 4:10-5.30pm

Class place:                RG20

First class:                  Monday 25th January 2010

Last class:                  Wednesday 28th April 2010

Lecturer:                      Pippa Norris, McGuire Lecturer in Comparative Politics

Office:                         Littauer 110, Kennedy School of Government

Office Hours:                     Mondays 3.00-4.30pm (Sign-up sheet on the door)
Fax:                                        (617) 496 2850

Tel:                                         (857) 445 9105
Email:                                   
Pippa_Norris@harvard.edu

Weblog:                               http://pippanorris.typepad.com/

Class website:                   www.pippanorris.com under ‘classes’

Faculty Assistant:             Camiliakumari Wankaner

Office:                                  Littauer 201 Tel: (617) 495 5994 Fax: (617) 496 6372

Email:                                    camiliakumari_wankaner@Harvard.Edu

Assessment:                Course assignments, no exam

Aims and objectives of API-415:

This course provides the analytical knowledge and practical skills to understand comparative politics worldwide.

It addresses a wide range of policy-relevant issues:  What are the key features of democracies and autocracies, and how can regimes in South Africa, Nigeria and Iran be classified? What is the appropriate balance of powers between the president and the Congress in Venezuela, Brazil and Mexico? What are the prospects for building stable states and democratic governance in Iraq and Afghanistan? How could human rights be strengthened through constitutional reforms in Russia and Belarus? Is traditional political activism eroding in the U.S., UK, France and Germany? How do government structures shape the delivery of economic and welfare policies in India and China?

The course covers these questions and many others by utilizing the methods and techniques of comparative politics.  You will learn about polities worldwide – as well as thereby enriching and deepening your understanding of your own nation. The orientation is problem and reform focused. API415 analyzes (i) the nature of comparative politics (ii) processes of state formation and the classification of regimes types, (iii) the structure of political institutions, (iv) the role of political actors, and (v) processes of governance performance. API-415 reviews the leading research literature to understand the theoretical concepts and empirical literature on each topic and then compares case-studies to apply these ideas to particular nations.  Evaluation involves workgroup case-study presentations as well as three individual reports.

The course will provide invaluable skills and knowledge for anyone seeking to develop familiarity with the major issues in comparative politics and the practical skills in analyzing countries around the globe.   In the age of globalization, cross-national insights into politics are invaluable for a wide range of potential careers, whether working for international agencies, multilateral organizations, non-profit NGOs, international corporations, or national governments.

Class

Date

Topic

Due dates (i)

 

 

INTRODUCTION

 

1

M 25 Jan

Overview:  Roadmap of the class

 

2

W 27 Jan

What is comparative politics?

 

3

M 1 Feb

Comparative methods: case studies & large-N analysis

 

 

 

STATES AND REGIMES

 

4

W 3 Feb

The nation state

 

5

M 8 Feb

Regimes: Varieties of democracy

 

6

W 10 Feb

Regimes: Varieties of autocracy

 

7

W 17 Feb

Case-study discussions:  South Africa, Nigeria, and Iran

 

 

 

INSTITUTIONS

 

8

M 22 Feb

Institutions: Constitutions

 

9

W 24 Feb

Institutions:  Electoral systems

Report 1

10

M 1 Mar

Institutions:  Executives & bureaucracies

 

11

W 3 Mar

Institutions:  Legislatures

 

12

M 8 Mar

Institutions:  Federalism and decentralization

 

13

W 10 Mar

Case-study discussions: UK, US, France and Germany

 

 

 

ACTORS

 

14

M 22 Mar

Political parties & party systems

 

15

M 24 Mar

Interest groups & social movements

 

16

M 5 Apr

Political culture

Report 2

17

W 7 Apr

Political activism

 

18

M 12 Apr

Political communication

 

19

W 14 Apr

Case-study discussions: Mexico and Brazil

 

 

 

POLICIES

 

20

M 18 Apr

Policymaking processes

 

21

W 21 Apr

Governance performance: Economic performance & welfare states

 

22

M 26 Apr

Case-study discussions: India and China

 

23

W 28 Apr

Conclusion & wrap up

 Report 3

Notes:

No class will be held on President’s Day (M 15th Feb), during spring break (13-21st March), or on 29th and 31st March (due to a prior engagement).

(i) Assignments are due to be handed in at the start of the class on these dates. 

Occasional visiting speakers will be added to the final schedule.

General points for all assignments:

  • Participants are expected to keep up with the required readings and to attend classes every Monday and Wednesday. 

  • Late policy: Barring an extraordinary excuse, all late assignments will be marked down a third of a grade (such as from A to A-) for each day following the due date.

  • Your assignments are designed to be crafted as evidence-based policy analysis, reflecting the leading academic research on each topic.  Your work needs to be carefully written and supported by direct evidence derived from the available data and from citations to existing research.

  • Use effective endnote references citing sources from the peer-reviewed research literature, as suggested from the extensive readings listed in the syllabi and others related publications.  Use endnotes to support any contentious claims and to acknowledge any data sources.

1. case study presentations. Submission deadline:  see schedule (30%)

You are asked to join a small workgroup which will make a collective 10-minute power-point presentation to the class followed by a 15-20 minute Q&A based on explaining the institutional structure, key actors and contemporary issues facing in a pair of country cases, selected from those listed in the class schedule:  The aim is to apply the major conceptual frameworks, comparative methods, and general lessons from the class to specific cases. Workgroups will meet with me a week before the presentation to discuss and groups will then present to class each month during one of the scheduled slots. The power-point report and accompanying briefing notes will be submitted after class and a collective grade will be awarded to each workgroup based on the quality of the presentation. The starting point for your reading preparation should be the relevant national chapters in the Fields et al textbook.

 

2. research reports chosen from discussion topics listed in classes 1-9. Submission deadline:   (20%)

Choose ONE of the discussion questions listed in the syllabus in classes 1-9. The literature review should draw upon the recommended readings and research literature on the selected topic listed in the syllabus, as well as upon any online resources and publications. Your report should be structured with subheadings to cover the following topics: 

                                 I.            The executive summary of the plan of your report and the major conclusions;

                                II.            Summary of the core topic;

                              III.            Review of the research literature organized thematically;

                              IV.            Conclusions and implications;

                               V.            Technical appendix (including longer tables, larger graphs/figures, definition of indicators and sources, if used.)

                              VI.            Endnotes: comprehensive list of literature and references used in the report.

 

The discussions during class will provide some ideas on these topics and you are encouraged to work collaboratively with others, but each student should submit his or her own report for an individual grade. The report should be about 2,500-3,000 words in length in professional format. More details will be given out in class nearer the deadline.

 

3. research reports chosen from discussion topics listed in classes 10-15. Submission deadline:   (20%)

Choose ONE of the discussion questions listed in the syllabus in classes 10-15. The literature review should draw upon the recommended readings and research literature on the selected topic listed in the syllabus, as well as upon any online resources and publications. Your report should be structured with subheadings to cover the following topics: 

                                 I.            The executive summary of the plan of your report and the major conclusions;

                                II.            Summary of the core topic;

                              III.            Review of the research literature organized thematically;

                              IV.            Conclusions and implications;

                               V.            Technical appendix (including longer tables, larger graphs/figures, definition of indicators and sources, if used.)

                              VI.            Endnotes: comprehensive list of literature and references used in the report.

 

The discussions during class will provide some ideas on these topics and you are encouraged to work collaboratively with others, but each student should submit his or her own report for an individual grade. The report should be about 2,500-3,000 words in length in professional format. More details will be given out in class nearer the deadline.

 

4. research reports chosen from discussion topics listed in classes 16-22. Submission deadline:   (20%)

Choose ONE of the discussion questions listed in the syllabus in classes 16-22. The literature review should draw upon the recommended readings and research literature on the selected topic listed in the syllabus, as well as upon any online resources and publications.  Your report should be structured with subheadings to cover the following topics: 

                                 I.      The executive summary of the plan of your report and the major conclusions;

                                II.      Summary of the core topic;

                              III.      Review of the research literature organized thematically;

                              IV.      Conclusions and implications;

                               V.      Technical appendix (including longer tables, larger graphs/figures, definition of indicators and sources, if used.)

                              VI.      Endnotes: comprehensive list of literature and references used in the report.

 

The discussions during class will provide some ideas on these topics and you are encouraged to work collaboratively with others, but each student should submit his or her own report for an individual grade. The report should be about 2,500-3,000 words in length in professional format. More details will be given out in class nearer the deadline.

 

4. Class Participation (10%)

Lastly, everyone will be expected to participate in class, including through brief class exercises. Sessions will involve discussing the readings, group exercises, report presentations, case studies, and debates about controversial issues.

j0431167.jpg

You should plan to purchase the following available from Amazon, the Harvard Coop, and other bookshops. The total cost is around $142. All other materials can be downloaded from journals available at Harvard. You will need to go through the Hollis security screen to download these. There are no course packets to purchase.

·         Daniele Caramani. 2008. Comparative Politics. Oxford: Oxford University Press. $35.95. 978-0-19-929841-9.

·         Kenneth Newton and Jan W. van Deth. 2010. Foundations of Comparative Politics 2nd Edition. New York: Cambridge University Press.  9780521136792 $45

·         Karl Fields, Patrick O’Neil and Don Sher. 2006. Cases in Comparative Politics. 2nd Ed. New York: W.W. Norton & Co. $60.07.

To find other journal literature, use the SSCI Web of Science index. A guide to using this for effective literature reviews will be given in class. You can get access here:

http://eresearch.lib.harvard.edu/V/1MRP6QDQ83C7MHEPFH9CGT7JUBR25SFETH5EJ62DIL3KARRGYH-26745?func=native-link&resource=HVD02803

For book searches, use Harvard’s Hollis catalogue http://lib.harvard.edu/ which links to Google books.

 

http://ukcatalogue.oup.com/images/en_US/covers/medium/9780199298419_140.jpg 

Cases in Comparative Politics (Second Edition)

Foundations of Comparative Politics

 

 

Part I: Introduction:

1

 

Overview:  Roadmap of the class

2

 

What is comparative politics?

 

Discussion topics

·         Is a science of comparative politics possible?

·         Which is preferable and why, large-N quantitative cross-national studies or qualitative ethnographic case-studies?

 

Required readings

Daniele Caramani. 2008. Comparative Politics. Oxford: Oxford University Press.  Introduction and Ch 1

 

Recommended supplementary resources

Almond, Gabriel G. Bingham Powell, Russell Dalton, and Kaare Strom. Eds. 2010. Comparative Politics Today: A World View. 9th Edition. New York: Longman/Pearson. 

Boix, Carles and Susan C. Stokes. Eds. 2007. The Oxford Handbook of Comparative Politics. New York: Oxford University Press.  Part I

Collier, David. ‘The comparative method’. In Political Science: The State of the Discipline ed A. W.Finifter. Washington DC: APSA.

van Deth, Jan. (ed.) (1998) Comparative Politics: The Problem of Equivalence. London: Routledge.

 

Online resources

www.oxfordtextbooks.co.uk/orc/caramani/

3

 

Comparative methods

 

Discussion topics

·         What are the main criteria you recommend in selecting cases and why?

·         What are the advantages and disadvantages of the ‘most similar’ and the ‘most different’ research designs?

 

Required readings

Daniele Caramani. 2008. Comparative Politics. Oxford: Oxford University Press.  Ch 2 & 3

 

Recommended supplementary resources

Boix, Carles and Susan Stokes. Eds. 2007. The Oxford Handbook of Comparative Politics. Oxford University Press. Part I

Brady, Henry and David Collier. 2004. Rethinking social inquiry: Diverse tools, shared standards. New York: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.

Collier, David, James Mahoney and Jason Seawright. 2004. ‘Claiming too much: Warnings about selection bias.’ In Rethinking Social Inquiry: Diverse Tools,Shared Standards. Ed. Henry E. Brady and David Collier. Lanham, MD: Rowman and Littlefield.

Collier, David. ‘The comparative method’. In Political Science: The State of the Discipline ed A. W.Finifter. Washington DC: APSA.

Geddes, Barbara. 2003. Paradigms and Sand Castles: Theory building and research design in comparative politics. Chapter 3. Ann Arbor, MI: The University of Michigan Press.

George, Alexander L.  and Andrew Bennett. 2004. Case Studies and Theory Development. Cambridge, MA: The MIT Press.

Geering, John. 2007. Case Study research: Principles and Practices. Cambridge University Press.

King, Gary, Robert Keohane et al. 1994. Designing Social Inquiry. Princeton: Princeton University Press.

Landman, Todd. 2007. Issues and Methods in Comparative Politics. London: Routledge.

Munck, Geraldo and R. Snyder. Eds. 2007. Passion, Craft and Method in Comparative Politics. Baltimore: The Johns Hopkins Press.

Przeworski, Adam and H. Teune. 1970. The Logic of Comparative Social Inquiry. R.E.Kreiger.

Pennings, Paul, Hans Keman and J. Kleinnijenhuis. 2006. Doing Research in Political Science: An introduction to comparative methods and statistics. London: Sage.

Ragin, Charles C. 2000. Fuzzy-Set Social Science. Chicago: University of Chicago.

 

Online resources

www.oxfordtextbooks.co.uk/orc/caramani/

 

 

Part II: STAtes and regimes

4

 

The nation state

 

Discussion topics

·         What explains the proliferation of states around the world?

·         Is nationalism eroding due to globalization – or strengthening?

·         Do nations create states – or vice versa?

·         What conditions facilitate state-building and nation-building?

 

Required readings

Daniele Caramani. 2008. Comparative Politics. Oxford: Oxford University Press.  Ch 4 and 24

Kenneth Newton and Jan W. van Deth. 2010. Foundations of Comparative Politics 2nd Edition. New York: Cambridge University Press. Ch1

 

Recommended supplementary resources

Bates, Robert H. 2009. When Things Fall Apart: State Failure in Late-Century Africa. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Call, Charles T. and Vanessa Wyeth. 2008. Building States to Build Peace. Boulder, CO: Lynne Rienner.

Dobbin, James et al. 2005. The UN’s Role in Nation-Building: From the Congo to Iraq. Rand Corp.

Dunleavy, Patrick and Brendan O’Leary. 1987. Theories of the State Basingstoke: Macmillan.

Fukuyama, Francis. 2004. State-Building: Governance and World Order in the 21st Century. Cornell University Press.

Ghani, Ashraf and Claire Lockhart. 2008. Fixing Failed States: A Framework for Rebuilding a Fractured World. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Gill, Graeme. 2003. The Nature and Development of the Modern State. Basingtoke: Palgrave.

Held, David, Anthony McGrew, David Goldblatt and Jonathan Perraton.  1999. Global Transformations. Stanford: Stanford University Press.

Kaplan, Seth. 2008. Fixing Fragile States: A New Paradigm for Development. New York: Praeger.

McGrew, Anthony and David Held. Eds. 2007. Globalization Theory: Approaches and Controversies. Cambridge: Polity.

Ohmae, K. 1995. The End of the Nation State. NY: Free Press.

Posner, Daniel. 2005. Institutions and Ethnic Politics in Africa. Cambridge University Press.

Rotberg, Robert. Ed. 2003. When States Fail: Causes and Consequences. Princeton University Press.

Vincent, Andrew. 1987. Theories of the State. Oxford: Blackwell.

Varshney, Ashutosh. 2003. Ethnic Conflict and Civil Life: Hindus and Muslims in India. Yale University Press.

Zartman, I. William. Ed. 1995. Collapsed States: The Disintegration and Restoration of Legitimate Authority. Boundler, CO: Lynne Rienner.

 

Online resources

List of U.N. member states: http://www.un.org/en/members/index.shtml

CIA World Fact-book: https://www.cia.gov/library/publications/the-world-factbook/index.html

5

 

Regimes: Varieties of democracy

 

Discussion topics

·         Is there a universal meaning to the concept of democracy or are understandings relativistic?

·         What are the pros and cons of dichotomous or continuous regime classifications?

 

Required readings

Daniele Caramani. 2008. Comparative Politics. Oxford: Oxford University Press.  Ch 5

Kenneth Newton and Jan W. van Deth. 2010. Foundations of Comparative Politics 2nd Edition. New York: Cambridge University Press. Ch2

 

Recommended supplementary resources

Dahl, Robert A. 1956. A Preface to Democratic Theory. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.

Dahl, Robert A. 1989. Democracy and its Critics.  New Haven: Yale University Press.

Dahl, Robert A. 2000. On Democracy. New Haven: Yale University Press.

Dryzek, John. 2000. Deliberative Democracy and Beyond: Liberals, Critics, Contestations. Oxford University Press.

Elkins, Zachary. 2000. Gradations of Democracy? Empirical tests of alternative conceptualizations   American Journal Of Political Science 44 (2): 293-300.

Gastil, John and Peter Levine. Eds. 2005. The deliberative democracy handbook: strategies for effective civic engagement in the twenty-first century. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.

Geddes, Barbara.  1999.  ‘What Do We Know About Democratization After Twenty Years?’ Annual Review of Political Science, 2:115-44.

Goodin, Robert E. 2008. Innovating democracy: democratic theory and practice after the deliberative turn.  Oxford University Press.

Held, David. 2006. Models of Democracy. 3rd Ed. Cambridge: Polity.

Huntington, Samuel P. 1993. The Third Wave. Norman: University of Oklahoma Press.

Jon, Elster. Ed.  1998. Deliberative Democracy. Cambridge University Press.

Lijphart, Arendt. 1999. Patterns of Democracy New Haven: Yale.

Norris, Pippa. 2008. Driving Democracy: Do Power-sharing Institutions Work? Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Munck, Geraldo L., and Jay Verkuilen. 2002. ‘Conceptualizing and Measuring Democracy: Evaluating Alternative Indices.’ Comparative Political Studies 35: 5-34.

Przeworsk, Adam, Michael E. Alvarez, Jose Antonio Cheibub and Fernando Limongi. 2000. Democracy and Development: Political Institutions and Well-Being in the World, 1950-1990. Chapter 1.

Rosenberg, Shawn W. Ed. 2007. Deliberation, participation and democracy: can the people govern? Palgrave Macmillan.

Schumpeter, Joseph. 1994. Capitalism, Socialism and Democracy, Routledge.

 

Online resources

Quality of Governance dataset (The QoG Data under ‘Data’)

Freedom House 'Freedom in the World’ (under Publications). Read especially ‘Essays’, ‘Tables and Charts’ and ‘Methodology’. (latest year available)

Marshall, Monty G. and Keith Jaggers. 2002. Polity IV Project: Political Regime Characteristics and Transitions, 1800-2002: Dataset Users’ Manual. Maryland: University of Maryland. 

Vanhanen, Tatu. 2000. ‘A new dataset for measuring democracy, 1810-1998.’ Journal of Peace Research 37 (2): 251-265

6

 

Regimes: Varieties of autocracy

 

Discussion topics

·         What is meant by the concepts of ‘electoral democracy’, ‘electoral autocracy’, ‘competitive authoritarianism’, and ‘illiberal democracy’? Which concept is most useful and valid for comparative purposes? How would you propose to measure each?

·         What has caused the growth of electoral autocracies worldwide?

·         Do electoral autocracies gradually lead towards electoral democracies?

 

Required readings

Daniele Caramani. 2008. Comparative Politics. Oxford: Oxford University Press.  Ch 6

LeDuc, Lawrence, Richard Niemi and Pippa Norris. 2010. ‘Introduction: Building and Sustaining Democracy.’ In Comparing Democracies 3 London: Sage. Chapter available online at www.pippanorris.com

 

Recommended supplementary resources

Armony, Ariel C., and Hector E. Schamis. 2005. ‘Babel in Democratization Studies.’ Journal of Democracy 16: 113-28.

Carothers, Thomas. 2002. ‘The End of the Transition Paradigm.’ Journal of Democracy 13: 5–21.

Collier, David and Robert Adcock. 1999. ‘Democracy and dichotomies: A pragmatic approach to choices about concepts.’ Annual Review of Political Science 1: 537-565.

Diamond, Larry. 2002. ‘Thinking about Hybrid Regimes.’ Journal of Democracy 13: 21-35

Elkins, Zachary. 2000. ‘Gradations of Democracy? Empirical Tests of Alternative Conceptualizations.’ American Journal of Political Science 44: 293-300.

Levitsky, Steven, and Lucan A. Way. 2002. ‘The Rise of Competitive Authoritarianism.’ Journal of Democracy 13: 51-65.

Lindburg, Staffan. 2006. Democracy and Elections in Africa. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins Press.

Lindburg, Staffan. Ed., 2009. Democratization by Elections - A New Mode of Transition. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins Press.

Linz, Juan. 2000. Totalitarian and Authoritarian Regimes. Boulder: Lynne Rienner.

Przeworski, Adam, Michael E. Alvarez, Jose Antonio Cheibub, and Fernando Limongi. 2000. Democracy and Development: Political Institutions and Well-Being in the World, 1950-1990. New York: Cambridge University Press.

Rotberg, Robert. 2007. Worst of the Worst. World Peace Foundation.

Zakaria, Fareed. 1997. ‘The Rise of Illiberal Democracy.’ Foreign Affairs 76: 22-41.

Zakaria, Fareed. 2003. The Future of Freedom: Illiberal Democracy at Home and Abroad. New York: Norton.

 

Online resources

Amnesty International www.amnesty.org

Human Rights Watch www.hrw.org

Freedom House www.freedomhouse.org

7

 

Case-studies: South Africa, Nigeria and Iran

 

Discussion topics

·         How would you classify the contemporary regimes governing South Africa, Nigeria and Iran?

 

Required readings

Karl Fields, Patrick O’Neil and Don Sher. 2006. Cases in Comparative Politics. 2nd Ed. New York: W.W. Norton & Co.

See section II above.

 

 

Part III: institutions

8

 

Constitutions

 

Discussion topics

  • Is there a single best set of democratic institutions?
  • What are the key contrasts between ‘consensus’ or ‘majoritarian’ democracies; compare and contrast two developing countries exemplifying each type. 

·         Do we know enough about the impact of political institutions to engage in successful ‘constitutional engineering’?  Compare the outcome of constitutional peace settlements in two societies to consider these issues.

 

Required readings

Daniele Caramani. 2008. Comparative Politics. Oxford: Oxford University Press.  Ch 10

Kenneth Newton and Jan W. van Deth. 2010. Foundations of Comparative Politics 2nd Edition. New York: Cambridge University Press. Ch 3

 

Recommended supplementary resources

Arjomand, Said Amir. Ed. 2007. Constitutionalism and political reconstruction. Boston: Brill.

Banting, Keith and Richard Simeon (Ed.) 1985. Redesigning the State. Toronto: Univ. of Toronto Press.

Buchanan, James M. and Gordon Tullock. 1962. The Calculus of Consent. Indianapolis, IN: Liberty Fund.

Carothers, Thomas. 1999. Aiding Democracy Abroad.  Chapter 7. Washington DC: Carnegie.

Elster, Jon. 1995. ‘Forces and Mechanisms in the Constitution-Making Process.’ Duke Law Journal 45, (November), 364-396

Jones, Mark P. 1995. Electoral Laws and the Survival of Presidential Democracies. Notre Dame: University of Notre Dame Press.

Lijphart, Arend. 1999. Patterns of Democracy: Government Forms and Performance in 36 Countries.  Yale: Yale University Press.

Linz, Juan J and Arturo Valenzuela. Eds.1994. The Failure of Presidential Democracy. The Johns Hopkins Press. 

Mainwaring, Scott and Matthew Soberg Shugart. 1997. Presidentialism and Democracy in Latin America. New York: Cambridge University Press.

Persson T. and Tabellini G. 2005. The Economic Effect of Constitutions. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.

Prempeh HK. 2007. ‘Africa's "constitutionalism revival": False start or new dawn?’ Icon-International Journal Of Constitutional Law 5 (3): 469-506.

Reynolds, Andrew. Ed. 2002. The Architecture of Democracy: Constitutional Design, Conflict Management and Democracy. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Sartori, Giovanni. 1994. Comparative Constitutional Engineering: An Inquiry Into Structures, Incentives, and Outcomes. New York: Columbia University Press.

Schneider, Aaron. 2003. ‘Decentralization: Conceptualization and measurement.’ Studies in Comparative International Development 38(3): 32-56.

Schugart, Mathew Soberg and John Carey. 1992. Presidents and Assemblies: Constitutional Design and Electoral Dynamics. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Tsebelis, George. 2002. Veto Players. How Political Institutions Work. Princeton: Princeton University Press.

Voigt, Stefan. 1999. Explaining Constitutional Change – A Positive Economics Approach. Cheltenham: Edward Elgar.

Watts, Ronald L. 1999. Comparing Federal Systems. 2nd Ed. Kingston, Ontario: McGill-Queen’s University Press.

Zachary Elkins, Thomas Ginsburg and James Melton. 2007. The Lifespan of Written Constitutions (University of Illinois, unpublished paper).

Zachary Elkins, Thomas Ginsburg and James Melton. 2009. The Endurance of National Constitutions. New York: Cambridge University Press.

Samuels, Kirsti. 2007. Constitution building processes and democratization: A discussion of twelve case studies. International IDEA.

 

Online resources

International IDEA Constitutions Building Project http://www.idea.int/cbp/index.cfm

Elkins and Ginsburg: http://www.comparativeconstitutionsproject.org/  

Constitution Finder: http://confinder.richmond.edu/

9

 

Electoral systems

 

Discussion topics

·         In considering debates about electoral reform, list the five most important normative values that any electoral system should meet, and give detailed reasons justifying your choices.

·         What are the major distinctions between plurality first-past the-post, the alternative vote, the single transferable vote, combined/ mixed, and party list electoral systems? Discuss with illustrations of recent elections held under each type of rules.

·         Are mixed member (combined) electoral systems the best of all possible worlds?

 

Required readings

Daniele Caramani. 2008. Comparative Politics. Oxford: Oxford University Press.  Ch 10

Kenneth Newton and Jan W. van Deth. 2010. Foundations of Comparative Politics 2nd Edition. New York: Cambridge University Press. Ch 11

 

Recommended supplementary resources

Benoit, Kenneth. 2007. ‘Electoral Laws as Political Consequences: Explaining the Origins and Change of Electoral Institutions.’ Annual Review of Political Science 10: 363-90.

Birch, Sarah et al. Ed. 2002. Embodying Democracy: Electoral System Design in Post-Communist Europe. New York: Palgrave.

Birch, Sarah. 2002. Electoral systems and Political Transformation in Post-Communist Europe. New York: Palgrave.

Colomer, Joseph M. 2004. Handbook of Electoral System Choice. New York: Palgrave Macmillan.

Cox, Gary. 1997. Making Votes Count. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Gallagher, Michael and Paul Mitchell. Eds. 2005. The Politics of Electoral Systems. Oxford University Press.

Katz, Richard S. 1997. Democracy and Elections. New York: Oxford University Press.

Lijphart, Arend. 1994. Electoral Systems and Party Systems: A Study of Twenty-Seven Democracies, 1945-1990. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Lijphart, Arend. 1997. ‘Unequal participation: democracies unresolved dilemma.’ American Political Science Review. 91:1-14.

Norris, Pippa. 2004. Electoral Engineering. Cambridge University Press. Online at www.pippanorris.com

Pérez-Liñán, Aníbal. 2001. ‘Neo-institutional accounts of voter turnout: moving beyond industrial democracies.’ Electoral Studies. 20(2): 281-297.

Powell, Jr, G. Bingham. 2000. Elections as Instruments of Democracy. Yale University Press.

Reilly, Ben, and Andrew Reynolds. 1998. Electoral Systems and Conflict in Divided Societies.  Washington, DC: National Academy Press.

Reilly, Ben. 2001. Democracy in Divided Societies: Electoral Engineering for Conflict Management. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Shugart, Matthew and Martin Wattenberg. 2001. Mixed-Member Electoral Systems. New York: Oxford University Press.

Sisk, Timothy and Andrew Reynolds. Eds. 1998. Elections and Conflict Management in Africa. US Institute of Peace.

Snyder, Jack. 2000. From Voting to Violence: Democratization and Nationalist Conflict. New York: W.W. Norton.

Taagepera, Rein and Matthew Shugart. 1989. Seats and Votes: The Effects and Determinants of Electoral Systems. Yale University Press.

Wilkinson, Steven. 2006. Votes and Violence: Electoral Competition and Ethnic Riots in India. Cambridge University Press.

 

Online resources

Reynolds, Andrew, Ben Reilly and Andrew Ellis. 2005. The International IDEA Handbook of Electoral System Design. 2nd ed. Stockholm: International Institute for Democracy and Electoral Assistance.

ACE Electoral Knowledge Network

Pintor, Rafael Lopez and Maria Gratschew. Voter Turnout Since 1945: A Global Report. Stockholm, International IDEA.

International Foundation for Electoral Systems (IFES)

10

 

Executives and bureaucracies

 

Discussion topics

·         Are presidential regimes inherently unstable?

 

Required readings

Daniele Caramani. 2008. Comparative Politics. Oxford: Oxford University Press.  Ch 8

Kenneth Newton and Jan W. van Deth. 2010. Foundations of Comparative Politics 2nd Edition. New York: Cambridge University Press. Ch 4, 6 & 7

 

Recommended supplementary resources

Blais, André, Louis Massicotte and Agnieszka Dobrynska. 1997. ‘Direct presidential elections: A world summary.’ Electoral Studies 16(4): 441-455.

Cheibub, José. 2002. ‘Minority governments, deadlock situations, and the survival of presidential democracies.’ Comparative Political Studies 35: 284; 

Cheibub, José. 2007. Presidentialism, Parliamentarism, and Democracy.  New York: Cambridge University Press

Jones, Mark 1995. Electoral laws and the survival of presidential democracies. Paris: University of Notre-Dame Press.

Lijphart, Arendt. 1996. Ed. Presidential v. Parliamentary Government. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Linz, Juan and Arturo Valenzuela. Eds.1994. The Failure of Presidential Democracy: The Case of Latin America. The Johns Hopkins Press.

Linz, Juan and Alfred Stephan. 1996. Problems of Democratic Consolidation. Johns Hopkins Press.

Linz, Juan. 1990. ‘The Perils of Presidentialism.’ Journal of Democracy 1(1): 51-69.

Mainwaring, Scott and Matthew Soberg Shugart. 1997. Presidentialism and Democracy in Latin America. New York: Cambridge University Press.

Mainwaring, Scott. 1993. ‘Presidentialism, multipartism, and democracy - the difficult combination.’  Comparative Political Studies 26 (2): 198-228.

Schugart, Mathew Soberg and John Carey. 1992. Presidents and Assemblies: Constitutional Design and Electoral Dynamics. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press

Riggs, Fred W. 1997.  ‘Presidentialism versus parliamentarism: Implications for representativeness and legitimacy.’ International Political Science Review, 18 (3): 253-278.

Stepan, Alfred and Cindy Skach. 1993. ‘Constitutional frameworks and democratic consolidation: Parliamentarism and presidentialism.’ World Politics 46 (1): 1-22.

 

Online resources

CIA World Leaders: List of Head of State and Cabinet Ministers  https://www.cia.gov/library/publications/world-leaders-1/index.html

11

 

Legislatures

 

Discussion topics

·         Does descriptive representation in parliamentary bodies influence legislative priorities and activities?

·         How can parliamentary accountability, transparency, and oversight be strengthened?

 

Required readings

Daniele Caramani. 2008. Comparative Politics. Oxford: Oxford University Press.  Ch 7

Kenneth Newton and Jan W. van Deth. 2010. Foundations of Comparative Politics 2nd Edition. New York: Cambridge University Press. Ch 6

 

Recommended supplementary resources

Carey, John. 2008. Legislative Voting and Accountability. Cambridge University Press.

Dahlerup, Drude. Ed. 2006. Women, Quotas and Politics. London: Routledge

Karram, Azza. 2005. Women in Parliament: Beyond Numbers. A Revised Edition. IDEA: Stockholm.

Kurian, George Thomas, ed., 1998. World Encyclopedia of Parliaments and Legislatures.

Lane Kenworthy and Melissa Malami. 1999. ‘Gender Inequality in Political Representation: A Worldwide Comparative Analysis.’ Social Forces 78(1): 235-269.

Lijphart, Arendt. 1996. Ed. Presidential v. Parliamentary Government. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Lijphart, Arendt. 1999. Patterns of Democracy. Yale University Press.

Loewenberg, Gerhard, Peverill Squire, and D. Roderick Kiewiet (Editors). 2002. Legislatures: Comparative Perspectives on Representative Assemblies. University of Michigan Press.

Norton, Philip. Ed, 1998. Parliaments and Governments in Western Europe. Frank Cass.

Olson, David. 1994. Legislative Institutions: A Comparative View. M.E. Sharpe.

Reynolds, Andrew. 1999. ‘Women in the Legislatures and Executives of the World: Knocking at the Highest Glass Ceiling.’ World Politics 51(4): 547-572.

 

Online resources

Inter-parliamentary Union www.IPU.org

Parliaments online: http://www.gksoft.com/govt/en/parliaments.html

12

 

Federalism and decentralization

 

Discussion topics

·         Does decentralization strengthen or weaken good governance?

·         What are the practical policy recommendations that you would draw from World Bank Diagnostic Tools for governance decentralization?

 

Required readings

Daniele Caramani. 2008. Comparative Politics. Oxford: Oxford University Press.  Ch 11

Pippa Norris. 2009. Driving Democracy: Do Power-sharing Institutions Work? New York: Cambridge University Press. Ch 7

 

Recommended supplementary resources

Bird, Richard M.  and François Vaillancourt. Eds. 1999. Fiscal Decentralization in Developing Countries. New York: Cambridge University Press.

De Vries, Michiel S. 2000. ‘The rise and fall of decentralization: a comparative analysis of arguments and practices in European Countries.’ European Journal of Political Research 38, 193–224.

Denters, Bas and Lawrence Rose (Editors). 2005. Comparing Local Governance: Trends and Developments. London: Palgrave/Macmillan.

Devas N and S. Delay. 2006. ‘Local democracy and the challenges of decentralising the state: An international perspective’  Local Government Studies 32 (5): 677-695.

Ehtisham, Ahmad (Editor). 2002. Fiscal Decentralization. London: Routledge

Griffiths, Ann L. Ed. 2005. Handbook of Federal Countries, 2005. Montreal: Forum of Federations/McGill University Press.

Grindle, Merilee. 2007. Going Local: Decentralization, Democratization, and the Promise of Good Governance.

Hueglin, Thomas and Alan Fenna. 2006. Comparative Federalism. Toronto: Broadview Press.

Manor, James. 1999. The Political Economy of Democratic Decentralization. Washington, DC: The World Bank.

Rodden, Jonathan. 2004. ‘Comparative federalism and decentralization: On meaning and measurement.’ Comparative Politics 36 (4): 481.

Treisman, Daniel. 2007. The Architecture of Government: Rethinking Political Decentralization. New York: Cambridge University Press.

Wibbels, Erik. 2005. Federalism and the Market: Intergovernmental Conflict and Economic Reform in the Developing World. New York: Cambridge University Press.

 

Online resources

The Forum of Federations http://www.forumfed.org/en/index.php

13

 

Case studies: UK, US, France and Germany

 

Discussion topics

·         Compare and contrast political institutions in the UK, US, France and Germany.

 

Required readings

Karl Fields, Patrick O’Neil and Don Sher. 2006. Cases in Comparative Politics. 2nd Ed. New York: W.W. Norton & Co.

 

 

Part IV: actors

14

 

Political parties and party systems

 

Discussion topics

  • Have mass partisan loyalties eroded in established and newer democracies?

·         Are new cartel party systems emerging in Western Europe?

 

Required readings

Daniele Caramani. 2008. Comparative Politics. Oxford: Oxford University Press.  Ch 12 & 13

Kenneth Newton and Jan W. van Deth. 2010. Foundations of Comparative Politics 2nd Edition. New York: Cambridge University Press. Ch12

 

Recommended supplementary resources

Campbell, Angus, Philip Converse, Warren Miller, and Donald Stokes. 1960. The American Voter. University of Chicago Press.

Clarke, Harold, and Marianne Stewart. 1998. ‘The decline of parties in the minds of citizens.’ Annual Review of Political Science 1: 357-78.

Converse, Philip. 1964. ‘The nature of belief systems in mass publics.’ In David Apter, eds. Ideology and Discontent. New York: Free Press.

Crewe, Ivor and David Denver. Eds. 1985. Electoral Change in Western Democracies: Patterns and Sources of Electoral Volatility. New York: St. Martin's Press

Dalton, Russell and Hans-Dieter Klingemann, eds. Oxford Handbook of Political Behavior. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Dalton, Russell, and Martin P. Wattenberg. Ed. 2000. Parties without Partisans: Political Change in Advanced Industrial Democracies. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Diamond, Larry and Richard Gunther. 2001. Political Parties and Democracy. Johns Hopkins Press.

Franklin, Mark, Tom Mackie, Henry Valen, et al. 1992. Electoral Change: Responses to Evolving Social and Attitudinal Structures in Western Countries. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Gunther, Richard, Puhle, Hans-Jürgen and Montero, José Ramón (eds) (2007) Democracy, Intermediation, and Voting on Four Continents. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Gunther, Richard, Jose Ramon Montero and Joan J. Linz. 2002. Political Parties: Old Concepts and New Challenges. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Green, Donald, Bradley Palmquist, and Eric Schickler. 2002. Partisan Hearts and Minds: Political Parties and the Social Identities of Voters. New Haven, CT: Yale University Press.

Gunther, Richard, Jose Ramon Montero and Joan J. Linz. 2002. Political Parties: Old Concepts and New Challenges. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Holmberg, Sören. 1994. Party identification compared across the Atlantic. In M. Kent Jennings and Thomas Mann, eds., Elections at Home and Abroad. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press.

Kitschelt, Herbert, Zdenka Mansfeldova, Radoslaw Markowski and Gabor Toka. 1999. Post-Communist Party Systems. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Kitschelt, Herbert. 1994. The Transformation of European Social Democracy. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Lewis-Beck, Michael, Helmut Norpoth, William G. Jacoby, and Herbert F. Weisberg. 2008. The American Voter Revisited. University of Michigan Press.

Lipset, Seymour Martin and Stein Rokkan. 1967.  Party Systems and Voter Alignments. New York: Free Press.

Nie, Norman, Sidney Verba and John Petrocik. 1976. The Changing American Voter. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.

Rose, Richard and Derek W. Urwin 1970. ‘Persistence and Change in Western Party Systems Since 1945.’ Political Studies 18:287-319.

Richard Hofferbert, ed. 1998. Parties and Democracy. Oxford: Blackwell.

Webb, Paul, David Farrell, and Ian Holliday. Eds. 2006. Political parties in advanced industrial democracies. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

 

Online resources

Adam Carr’s Election Archive http://psephos.adam-carr.net/

Political Parties online: http://www.politicsresources.net/parties.htm

15

 

Advocacy groups and social movements

 

Discussion topics

  • Does social trust matter for democratic governance? Explain why and why not.

·         Compare and contrast any two nations to evaluate whether the central claims in Putnam’s theory of social capital hold in cross-cultural perspective?

 

Required readings

Daniele Caramani. 2008. Comparative Politics. Oxford: Oxford University Press.  Ch 14 & 16

Kenneth Newton and Jan W. van Deth. 2010. Foundations of Comparative Politics 2nd Edition. New York: Cambridge University Press. Ch 9

 

Recommended supplementary resources

Foley, Michael and Bob Edwards. 1998. ‘Beyond Tocqueville: Civil Society and Social Capital in Comparative Perspective.’ American Behavioral Scientist. 42(1): 5-20.

Hooghe, Marc and Dietlind Stolle. Eds. 2003.  Generating Social Capital: Civil Society and Institutions in Comparative Perspective.  New York: Palgrave Macmillan.

Keck, Margaret E.  and Kathryn Sikkink, 1998. Activists beyond Borders - Advocacy Networks in International Politics. Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press.

Krishna A. 2007. ‘How does social capital grow? A seven-year study of villages in India.’  Journal of Politics 69 (4): 941-956.

Norris, Pippa. 2002. Democratic Phoenix. Cambridge University Press. Chapter 8.

Ottaway, Marina and Thomas Carothers. Eds.2000. Funding Virtue: Civil Society Aid and Democracy Promotion. DC: Brookings Institution.

Paxton Pamela. 2002. ‘Social capital and democracy: An interdependent relationship.’ American Sociological Review.  67 (2): 254-277.

Putnam, Robert D. 1995. ‘The Strange Disappearance of Civic America.’ The American Prospect 7(24).

Putnam, Robert D. 2000. Bowling Alone. NY: Simon & Schuster.

Putnam, Robert. Ed. 2002. Democracy in Flux. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Rose, Richard and Doh C. Shin. 2001.Democratization backwards: The problem of third-wave democracies.’  British Journal Of Political Science 31: 331-354 Part 2, APR 2001

Schneider G, T. Plumper, and S. Baumann. 2000. ‘Bringing Putnam to the European regions - On the relevance of social capital for economic growth.’ European Urban And Regional Studies. 7 (4): 307-317.

Schofer E. and M. Fourcade-Gourinchas. 2001. ‘The structural contexts of civic engagement: Voluntary association membership in comparative perspective.’ American Sociological Review.  66 (6): 806-828.

Svendsen, Gunnar Lind Haase and Gert Tinggaard Svendsen. 2004. The Creation and Destruction of Social Capital: Entrepreneurship, Cooperative Movements, and Institutions. Cheltenham: Edward Elgar.

Van Deth, Jan Willem. Ed. 1997. Private Groups and Public Life: Social Participation, Voluntary Associations and Political Involvement in Representative Democracies. London: Routledge.

Van Deth, Jan.W. Ed. 1999. Social Capital and European Democracy. New York: Routledge

 

Online resources

World Bank Social Capital for Development

16

 

Culture

 

Discussion topics

·         What is Inglehart’s theory of the cultural roots of democratic regimes?

·         Is support for democracy now a universal value?

 

Required readings

Daniele Caramani. 2008. Comparative Politics. Oxford: Oxford University Press.  Ch 17

Kenneth Newton and Jan W. van Deth. 2010. Foundations of Comparative Politics 2nd Edition. New York: Cambridge University Press. Ch 13

 

Recommended supplementary resources

Almond, Gabriel A. and Sidney Verba. 1963. The Civic Culture: Political Attitudes and Democracy in Five Nations. Princeton: Princeton University Press.

Almond, Gabriel and Sidney Verba. Eds. 1980. The Civic Culture Revisited. Boston: Little Brown.

Diamond, Larry and Marc F. Plattner.  2008. Eds. How People View Democracy. Baltimore, MD: Johns Hopkins Press.

Inglehart, Ronald and Christopher Welzel. 2003. ‘Political culture and democracy - Analyzing cross-level linkages.’ Comparative Politics 36 (1): 61-+.

Inglehart, Ronald and Christopher Welzel. 2005. Modernization, Cultural Change, and Democracy: The Human Development Sequence. New York: Cambridge University Press. 

Inglehart, Ronald. 2000. Modernization and Postmodernization. Princeton, N.J: Princeton University Press.

Inglehart, Ronald. 2003. ‘How Solid is Mass Support for Democracy and How Do We Measure It?’  PS: Political Science and Politics.

Inglehart, Ronald, Basàñez, Miguel, Dìez-Medrano, Jaime, Halman, Loek and Luijkx, Ruud (eds).2004. Human Beliefs and Values: A cross-cultural sourcebook. Mexico: Siglo XXI Editores.

Inglehart, Ronald and Pippa Norris. 2003. Rising Tide: Gender Equality and Cultural Change around the World. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Norris, Pippa and Ronald Inglehart. 2005. Sacred and Secular. Cambridge University Press.

Norris, Pippa and Ronald Inglehart. 2009. Cosmopolitan Communications: Cultural Diversity in a Globalized World. Cambridge University Press.

Norris, Pippa. Ed. 1999. Critical Citizens. Oxford University Press.

Sarsfield, R. and F. Echegaray. 2006. ‘Opening the black box: How satisfaction with democracy and its perceived efficacy affect regime preference in Latin America.’ International Journal of Public Opinion Research 18 (2): 153-173

Seligson, Mitchell. A. 2002.  ‘The renaissance of political culture or the renaissance of the ecological fallacy?’ Comparative Politics. 34 (3): 273.

Tessler, Mark and E. Gao E. 2005. ‘Gauging Arab support for democracy Journal Of Democracy 16 (3): 83-97.

Welzel, Chris, Ronald Inglehart, and Hans-Dieter Klingemann. 2003. ‘The theory of human development: A cross-cultural analysis.’ European Journal of Political Research 42 (3): 341-379.

 

Online resources

Asia Barometer www.eastasiabarometer.org and http://www.asianbarometer.org/

EuroBarometer http://europa.eu.int/comm/public_opinion/

European Social Survey http://naticent02.uuhost.uk.uu.net

Gallup International Voice of the People  www.voice-of-the-people.net/

Global barometers http://www.globalbarometer.net/

International Social Survey Program http://www.issp.org/

Latinobarometro www.latinobarometro.org

New Europe Barometer www.cspp.strath.ac.uk

Pew Global Surveys http://pewglobal.org/

World Values Study 1981-2005  http://www.worldvaluessurvey.org/

World Public Opinion http://www.worldpublicopinion.org/

17

 

Political activism

 

Discussion topics

·         Does the traditional distinction between ‘conventional’ and ‘protest’ politics still make sense?

·         What measures of citizen engagement are available in social surveys and what aspects of contemporary activism are lacking?

·         How would you construct reliable scales of citizen activism from the ISSP-2004?

 

Required readings

Daniele Caramani. 2008. Comparative Politics. Oxford: Oxford University Press.  Ch 18

Kenneth Newton and Jan W. van Deth. 2010. Foundations of Comparative Politics 2nd Edition. New York: Cambridge University Press. Ch8

 

Recommended supplementary resources

Adrian, Charles and David A. Apter. 1995. Political Protest and Social Change: Analyzing Politics. NY: New York University Press.

Almond, Gabriel A.  and Sidney Verba. 1989 [1963].The Civic Culture: Political Attitudes and Democracy in Five Nations. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.

Almond, Gabriel A.  and Sidney Verba. Eds. 1980. The Civic Culture Revisited. Boston: Little Brown.

Barnes, Samuel and Max Kaase. 1979. Political Action: Mass Participation in Five Western Democracies. Beverley Hills, CA: Sage.

Blais, André and A. Dobrzynska. 1998. ‘Turnout in electoral democracies.’ European Journal of Political Research. 33(2): 239-261.

Blais, André. 2000. To Vote or Not to Vote? The Merits and Limits of Rational Choice Theory. Pittsburgh: University of Pittsburgh Press.

Burns, Nancy, Kay Lehman Schlozman and Sidney Verba. 2001. The Private Roots of Public Action. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.

Dalton, Russell J. 2009. The Good Citizen: How a Younger Generation is Reshaping American Politics. Washington, DC: CQ Press.

Franklin, Mark N. 2004. Voter Turnout and the Dynamics of Electoral Competition in Established Democracies Since 1945. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Jackman, Robert W.  and Ross A. Miller. 1995. ‘Voter Turnout in the Industrial Democracies during the 1980s.’ Comparative Political Studies, 27: 467-92.

Jennings, M. Kent and Jan van Deth. 1989. Continuities in Political Action. Berlin: deGruyter.

Marsh, Alan. 1977. Protest and Political Consciousness. Beverly Hills, CA: Sage

McDonald, Michael P.  and Samuel L. Popkin. 2001. ‘The myth of the vanishing voter.’ American Political Science Review 95 (4): 963-974.

Norris, Pippa. 2002. Democratic Phoenix: Reinventing Political Activism. New York: Cambridge University Press.

Norris, Pippa. 2004 Electoral Engineering: Voting Rules and Political Behavior. New York: Cambridge University Press.

Norris, Pippa. 2009. ‘Political activism: New challenges, new opportunities.’ For the Oxford Handbook of Comparative Politics Edited by Carles Boix and Susan Stokes (Oxford University Press). Available at www.pippanorris.com

Pintor, Rafael Lopez and Maria Gratschew. 2004. Voter Turnout Since 1945: A Global Report. Stockholm, International IDEA.   www.idea.int

Powell, G. Bingham. 1980. ‘Voting turnout in thirty democracies: Partisan, legal and socioeconomic influences.’ In Electoral Participation: A Comparative Analysis. Ed. Richard Rose. London: Sage

Putnam, Robert D. 2000. Bowling Alone: The Collapse and Revival of American Community. NY: Simon and Schuster.

Putnam, Robert D.. Ed. 2002. The Dynamics of Social Capital. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Rosenstone, Steve and Mark Hansen. 1993. Mobilization, participation, and American democracy. Wasinton DC: CQ Press.

Verba, Sidney and Norman H. Nie. 1972. Participation in America: political democracy and social equality. University of Chicago Press, Chicago, IL.

Verba, Sidney, Kay Schlozman and Henry E. Brady. 1995. Voice and Equality: Civic Voluntarism in American Politics. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.

Verba, Sidney, Norman H. Nie and Jae-on Kim. 1978. Participation and Political Equality: A Seven-Nation Comparison. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

18

 

Political Communication

 

Discussion topics

·         Are short-term factors (including media campaigns) increasingly significant drivers in voting behavior?

 

Required readings

Daniele Caramani. 2008. Comparative Politics. Oxford: Oxford University Press.  Ch 19

Kenneth Newton and Jan W. van Deth. 2010. Foundations of Comparative Politics 2nd Edition. New York: Cambridge University Press. Ch10

 

Recommended supplementary resources

Djankov, Simeon, Caralee McLiesh, Tatiana Nenova and Andrei Shleifer. 2003. ‘Who Owns The Media?’ Journal of Law and Economics, 46(2): 341-382.

Esser Frank, and Barbara Pfetsch. Eds. 2004. Comparing Political Communication: Theories, Cases, and Challenges.  Cambridge and New York: Cambridge University Press.

Gunther, Richard and Anthony Mughan. Eds. 2000. Democracy and the Media: A Comparative Perspective. New York: Cambridge University Press.

Norris, Pippa. Ed. 2010. The Roles of the News Media in the Governance Reform Agenda. Washington DC: The World Bank.

Norris, Pippa. 2000. A Virtuous Circle. New York: Cambridge University Press.

Voltmer, Katrin. Ed. 2006.  Mass media and political communication in new democracies. London: Routledge.

 

Online resources

Committee to Protect Journalists

Freedom House. Freedom of the Press.

Index on Censorship

International Federation of Journalists

19

 

Case-study discussion: Mexico and Brazil

 

Discussion topics

·          How would you compare and contrast the key political actors in Mexico and Brazil? What are the pros and cons of each political system?

 

Required readings

 Karl Fields, Patrick O’Neil and Don Sher. 2006. Cases in Comparative Politics. 2nd Ed. New York: W.W. Norton & Co.

See readings section IV above.

 

 

Part v:  policies

20

 

Policymaking processes

 

Discussion topics

·         How far can and do countries learn about public policy options from each other?

·         Compare and contrast two countries illustrating pluralist and corporatist models of public policymaking.

 

Required readings

Daniele Caramani. 2008. Comparative Politics. Oxford: Oxford University Press.  Ch 20

Kenneth Newton and Jan W. van Deth. 2010. Foundations of Comparative Politics 2nd Edition. New York: Cambridge University Press.Ch 14

 

Recommended supplementary resources

Castles, Francis G. 1999. Comparative Public Policy Edwards Elgar.

Dye, Thomas R. 2001. Understanding Public Policy. Prentice-Hall. 10th Ed.

Kingdon, John. 2002. Agendas, Alternatives, and Public Policies 2nd ed. Longman.

Lindblom, Charles. 1968. The Policy-making Process. NJ: Prentice-Hall.

Rose, Richard. 2004. Learning From Comparative Public Policy: A Practical Guide Routledge.

21

 

Government performance: the economy and welfare state

 

Discussion topics

·         Do democracies outperform autocracies in terms of social equality, human development, and the delivery of welfare services?

 

Required readings

Daniele Caramani. 2008. Comparative Politics. Oxford: Oxford University Press.  Ch 21, 22

Kenneth Newton and Jan W. van Deth. 2010. Foundations of Comparative Politics 2nd Edition. New York: Cambridge University Press. Ch16

 

Recommended supplementary resources

Bratton, Michael and Nicholas van de Walle. 1997. Democratic Experiments in Africa. Cambridge University Press.

Brown, D.S. 1999.  ‘Reading, writing, and regime type: Democracy's impact on primary school enrollment.’ Political Research Quarterly 52 (4): 681-707.

Brown, D.S. 1999. ‘Democracy and social spending in Latin America, 1980-92.’ American Political Science Review 93: 779

Burkhart, Ross E. 1997. ‘Comparative Democracy and Income Distribution: Shape and Direction of the Causal Arrow.’ Journal of Politics 59(1): 148-164.

Engerman Stanley L. and Kenneth L. Sokoloff. 2008. ‘Debating the role of institutions in political and economic development: Theory, history, and findings.’ Annual Review Of Political Science   11: 119-135.

Esping-Andersen, Gosta. 1990. The Three Worlds of Welfare. Princeton University Press.

Feng, Yi. 2003. Democracy, Governance and Economic Growth: Theory and Evidence. Cambridge, MA: The MIT Press.

Glaeser Edward L., R. La Porta, F. Lopez-de-Silanes, A. Shleifer. 2004. ‘Do institutions cause growth?’ Journal Of Economic Growth 9 (3): 271-303 SEP 2004

Halperin, Morton, Joseph T. Siegle and Michael Weinstein. 2005. The Democracy Advantage. New York: Routledge.

Hyden, Goran. 2007. ‘Governance and poverty reduction in Africa.’ Proceedings Of The National Academy Of Sciences Of The USA 104 (43): 16751-16756.

Kaufmann, Daniel, Aart Kraay, and Massimo Mastruzzi. 2007. ‘Growth and governance: A rejoinder.’ Journal Of Politics 69 (2): 570-572.

Kosack, S. 2003.  ‘Effective aid: How democracy allows development aid to improve the quality of life.’ World Development 31 (1): 1-22.

Krieckhaus,J. 2006. ‘Democracy and economic growth: How regional context influences regime effects.’ British Journal of Political Science 36(2): 317-340.

Lake, D.A.  and M.A. Baum. 2001. ‘The invisible hand of democracy - Political control and the provision of public services.’ Comparative Political Studies 34 (6): 587-621

Mulligan, Casey B., R. Gil and X. Sala-a-martin. 2004. ‘Do democracies have different public policies than non-democracies?’ Journal of Economic Perspectives 18(1): 51-74.

Navia, P. and T.D. Zweifel. 2003. ‘Democracy, Dictatorship, and Infant Mortality revisited.’ Journal of Democracy 14(3): 90-103

Nel P. 2005. ‘Democratization and the dynamics of income distribution in low- and middle-income countries.’ Politikon 32 (1): 17-43.

North, Douglas. 1990. Institutions, Institutional Change and Economic Performance. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Przeworski, Adam, Michael E. Alvarez, Jose Antonio Cheibub and Fernando Limongi. 2000. Democracy and Development: Political Institutions and Well-Being in the World, 1950-1990. Chapters 2 and 3.

Przeworski, Adam. 1991. Democracy and the Market: Political and Economic Reforms in Eastern Europe and Latin America Cambridge University Press.

Rigobon, R. and Dani Rodrik. 2005.  ‘Rule of law, democracy, openness, and income - Estimating the interrelationships.’  Economics of Transition 13 (3): 533-564.

Siegle, Joseph T., Michael Weinstein and Morton Halperin. 2004. ‘Why democracies excel.’ Foreign Affairs 83(5):57-72.

Seeleib-Kaiser, Martin. Ed. 2008. Welfare State Transformations: Comparative Perspectives. Palgrave.

Stasavage, D. 2005. ‘Democracy and education spending in Africa.’ American Journal of Political Science 49 (2): 343-358.

Stroup, Michael D. 2006. ‘Economic freedom, democracy, and the quality of life.’ World  Development 35(1): 52-66.

 

Online resources

ILO Data on social expenditure: https://www.ilo.org/dyn/sesame/ifpses.socialdbexp

UNDP Human Development Report data: http://hdr.undp.org/en/statistics/

22

 

Case-studies: India and China

 

Discussion topics

·         Compare and contrast how political institutions influence policy performance in India and China.

 

Required readings

Karl Fields, Patrick O’Neil and Don Sher. 2006. Cases in Comparative Politics. 2nd Ed. New York: W.W. Norton & Co.

See readings for section V above.

23

 

Conclusion & wrap up

 

 

 
 
 
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