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Dietrich, William F. 1999. "Guide to Research Databases of Acid Rain Assessment and Policy Literature." Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs (BCSIA) Discussion Paper E-99-04. Cambridge, MA: Environment and Natural Resources Program, Kennedy School of Government, Harvard University.

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For more information about this publication, you may contact:

William Dietrich at dietrichlaw "at" earthlink.net

Abstract

The purpose of this Guide to Research Databases of Acid Rain Assessment and Policy Literature ("Guide") is to provide a starting point for research regarding acid rain-related environmental assessments and policymaking processes. This Guide presents an annotated bibliography of information resources, focusing on databases and indices of abstracts. It covers academic libraries with on-line catalogs, institutional libraries with on-line catalogs, on-line services, Worldwide Web sites, the Social Learning Project Database, and paper indices.

For research regarding recent publications and events, the investigator should use electronic databases as a starting point, and rerun searches periodically to catch new entries. Most recently published works on acid rain are indexed in electronic databases, and many are provided in full-text in electronic databases. In addition, scientific articles, legislative bills, and a wide variety of other information relevant to the connection between environmental assessment and policymaking are available via the Internet. For research regarding the 1970's and early 1980's, certain paper indices are still useful.

This paper is part of the Global Environmental Assessment ("GEA") Project, which is a collaborative team study of global environmental assessment as a link between science and policy. This Guide will hopefully serve as a tool for the Project's research effort regarding acid rain. This paper should save time and provide guidance for the 1997-98 Global Environmental Assessment Project team members and others interested in similar research. Hopefully the fruits of such research will advance our collective response to the vexing problem of acidifying deposition.

 

 
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