Shorenstein Center Welcomes Leaders in Media and International Journalism for Fall 2014

Contact: Katie Miles
Phone: (617) 496-8636
Date: August 28, 2014

CAMBRIDGE, MA — The Shorenstein Center on Media, Politics and Public Policy, at Harvard Kennedy School, is pleased to announce its 2014 Fall Fellows.

“This fall’s Fellows will focus on two areas of consuming interest: the complex impact of digital technology on media and governance and the equally complex ongoing international turmoil in the Islamic world and in Ukraine; it’s going to be exciting!” said Alex S. Jones, the Center’s director.

Shorenstein Center Fellows spend the semester researching and writing a paper, and interacting with students and members of the Harvard community.

Yavuz Baydar is a Turkish journalist, blogger and co-founder of P24, the Platform for Independent Media. Baydar has been active both in print and audiovisual media for 35 years. Based in Istanbul, he writes regular opinion columns for Today’s Zaman with specific focus on domestic and foreign policy issues. His opinion articles have appeared in The New York Times, The Guardian, Süddeutsche Zeitung, El País, Al Monitor and the Al-Jazeera website. Baydar formerly served as president of the Organization of News Ombudsmen (ONO) and in 2014 received The Special Award of the European Press Prize for his work as Turkey’s first news ombudsman. At the Shorenstein Center, he will be exploring strategies to overcome obstacles for media self-regulation in emerging democracies.

Celestine Bohlen
is a columnist at the International New York Times and teaches journalism at Sciences-Po in Paris, France. Previously, she was a foreign correspondent for The New York Times based in Moscow, Budapest and Rome, and was also a culture reporter based in New York. Additionally, she has worked for Bloomberg, The Washington Post, The Trenton Times, The Washington Star and The Lowell Sun. At the Shorenstein Center, she will be researching the media coverage of the crisis in Ukraine, with a focus on the difficulties of tracking assets of individuals targeted by EU and US sanctions.

John M. Geddes is the former managing editor of The New York Times. Prior to his 2013 retirement he had also held the roles of deputy managing editor and business editor. Before joining The Times in 1994, he worked in various capacities at BIS Strategic Decisions, Friday Holdings, spent 13 years as an editor and reporter with The Wall Street Journal and served as a reporter for the AP-Dow Jones News Service and Ansonia Evening Sentinel in Connecticut. While at the Shorenstein Center, he will be writing about the collision of journalism and digital innovation through the lens of reporters and commentators who directly covered technology.

Matthew Hindman is an associate professor of media and public affairs at The George Washington University. His 2009 book, The Myth of Digital Democracy, won the 2010 Goldsmith Book Prize as well as the Donald McGannon Award. He has published on topics including online campaigning, "open source" politics, and the online public sphere. Hindman was a Javits Fellow at Princeton and a Fellow at both the Harvard Department of Government and the Kennedy School. At the Shorenstein Center, he will write about the future of journalism and the growing audience for online local news.

The Shorenstein Center on Media, Politics and Public Policy is a Harvard research center dedicated to exploring and illuminating the intersection of press, politics and public policy in theory and practice. The Center strives to bridge the gap between journalists and scholars, and between them and the public. More information about the Center is available at http://shorensteincenter.org.

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