h o m e i d e a s p h. d   t r a i n i n g p e o p l e s e m i n a r s u m m e r e u r o p e a n  n e t w o r k  o n  i n e q u a l i t y n e w s
  H o m e

 

 


PEOPLE


National Fellows

A campus archway, California

 


John Bound
University of Michigan

Jeanne Brooks-Gunn
Columbia University

Thomas D. Cook
Northwestern University

Sheldon Danziger
University of Michigan

Greg Duncan
Northwestern University

Roberto M. Fernandez
MIT Sloan School of Management

Frank Furstenberg
University of Pennsylvania

Harry J. Holzer
Georgetown University

Alan B. Krueger
Princeton University

Steven D. Levitt
University of Chicago

Susan E. Mayer
University of Chicago

Sara S. McLanahan
Princeton University

Lawrence M. Mead
New York University

Robert Moffitt
Johns Hopkins University

Ann S. Orloff
Northwestern University

John D. Stephens
University of North Carolina

R. Kent Weaver
Georgetown University


Profiles

John Bound
Professor of Economics and Faculty Research Associate at the Populations Studies Center, University of Michigan
John Bound received his Ph.D. from Harvard University in 1987 and is interested in labor economics, demography and econometrics.
His current research interests include work on the economic and health status of minority populations in the U.S. and the effects of transfer programs on behavior and economic well-being. He is also working on issues regarding changes in the wage structure over time and on the validity of survey data. Publications include: "Changes in the Department for Skilled Labor within U.S. Manufacturing Industries: Evidence from the Annual Survey of Manufacturing" (with Eli Berman and Zvi Griliches), Quarterly Journal of Economics, May 1994; "Changes in the Structure of Wages During the 1980s: An Evaluation of Alternative Explanations" (with George Johnson), American Economic Review, June 1992; and "What Went Wrong? The 1980s’ Erosion of the Economic Well Being of Black Men" (with Richard Freeman), Quarterly Journal of Economics, February 1992.

Jeanne Brooks-Gunn
Virginia and Leonard Marx Professor of Child Development and Education, Teachers College, Columbia University.
Jeanne Brooks-Gunn is the Virginia and Leonard Marx Professor of Child Development and Education at Teachers College, Columbia University. She is the first director of the Center for Children and Families, which was founded in 1992, at Teachers College. In addition, she is Co-Director of the Institute for Child and Family Policy at Columbia University, founded in 1999. Formerly, she was a Senior Research Scientist at Educational Testing Service and was a Visiting Scholar at the Russell Sage Foundation. She is a member of the Roundtable on Children at the Brookings Institute, the MacArthur Network on the Family and the Economy, and the NICHD Research Network on Child and Family Well-Being. She has served on three National Academy of Science Panels (Child Abuse and Neglect, Preventing HIV Infection, Defining Poverty). She was a member of the Social Science Research Council's Committee on the urban underclass focusing on neighborhoods, families and children. She is past president of the Society for Research on Adolescence and is a fellow in the American Psychological Association and the American Psychological Society. She received her B.A. from Connecticut College, an Ed.M. from Harvard University and a Ph.D. from the University of Pennsylvania. Author of over 300 published articles and 15 books, she has received the Vice President's National Performance Review Hammer Award, for her participation in the Federal Interagency Forum on Child and Family Statistics, National Institute for Child Health and Human Development Research Network (1998). She has been awarded the Nicholas Hobbs Award from the American Psychological Association's Division of Children, Youth, and Families, for her contribution to policy research for children (1997), and has also received the John B. Hill Award from the Society for Research on Adolescence for her life-time contribution to research on adolescence, (1996). In 1988, she received the William Goode Book Award from the American Sociological Association for her book Adolescent mothers in later life. She is editor of a new book series on youth and research and policy at the Harvard University Press.

Thomas D. Cook
Professor of Sociology, Psychology, Education and Social Policy and Joan and Serepta Harrison Chair in Ethics and Justice, Northwestern University
Thomas Cook is interested in social science methods for inferring causation, and through this interest he examines issues in evaluation research, primarily in the areas of education and community health. He has authored or edited several books on these topics, includingQuasi-Experimentation: Design and Analysis Issues for Field Settings, Qualitative and Quantitative Methods in Evaluation Research, and The Foundations of Evaluation Theory. He is also interested in understanding how individual and institutional factors combine to help some adolescents successfully navigate both middle class and ghetto worlds. Cook is also a member of the MacArthur Foundation Network on Successful Adolescence in High Risk Settings. He received the Myrdal Prize for Science from the Evaluation Research Society in 1982, the Donald Campbell Prize for Innovative Methodology from the Policy Sciences Organization in 1988, and the Distinguished Scientist Award of Division 5 of the American Psychological Association in 1997. He is a trustee of the Russell Sage Foundation and a member of its Committee on the Future of Work. Cook was elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in April 2000 and was inducted as the Margaret Mead Fellow of the American Academy of Political and Social Science in April 2003. He holds a B.A. from Oxford University and a Ph.D. from Stanford University.

Sheldon H. Danziger
Henry J. Meyer Collegiate Professor of Public Policy in the Gerald R. Ford School of Public Policy and Research Professor at the Population Studies Center, University of Michigan
Sheldon Danziger's research focuses on welfare reform and on the effects of economic, demographic, and public policy changes on trends in poverty and inequality. He is the author and co-editor of numerous books and articles including: America Unequal; Detroit Divided; Understanding Poverty; Securing the Future: Investing in Children From Birth To College; Child Poverty and Deprivation in the Industrialized Countries; and Uneven Tides: Rising Inequality in America. Danziger is a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, co-Director of the National Poverty Center, and Director of the Research and Training Program on Poverty and Public Policy. Professor Danziger received his Ph.D. from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He served as Director of the Institute for Research on Poverty at the University of Wisconsin-Madison from 1983 - 1988.

Greg Duncan
Edwina S. Tarry Professor, School of Education, Northwestern University; and Director, Northwestern University/University of Chicago Joint Center for Poverty Research

Greg Duncan joined the Northwestern faculty in 1995. He had been principal investigator of the Panel Study of Income Dynamics project at Michigan for the previous 13 years, professor of economics, and Distinguished Research Scientist at Michigan's Survey Research Center. Duncan has published extensively on issues of income distribution, child poverty and welfare dependence. He is the co-editor with Lindsay Chase Lansdale of For Better and For Worse: Welfare Reform and the Well-Being of Children and Families (2001). With Jeanne Brooks-Gunn, he also co-edited two recent books on neighborhood poverty and child development: Consequences of Growing up Poor (1997) and the two-volume Neighborhood Poverty (1997), which was also co-edited with Lawrence Aber. He continues to study neighborhood effects on the development of children and adolescents and other issues involving welfare reform, income distribution, and its consequences for children and adults. Duncan is a member of the interdisciplinary Family and Child Well-Being Research Network of the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development and the MacArthur Network on the Family and the Economy. He was elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in 2001.



Roberto M. Fernandez
William F. Pounds Professor of Behavioral Science, Sloan School of Management, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Roberto M. Fernandez is William F. Pounds Professor of Behavioral Science at the MIT Sloan School of Management. Fernandez's research and teaching focus on economic sociology, organizational behavior, social stratification, race, and ethnic relations. Among his current projects are networks and hiring and Internet-based recruitment. Recent published research includes: “How Much Is That Network Worth? Social Capital in Employee Referral Networks” (with Emilio Castilla), Social Capital: Theory and Research, 2001; “Social Capital at Work: Networks and Employment at a Phone Center” (with Emilio Castilla and Paul Moore), American Journal of Sociology, 2000; “Skill Biased Technological Change: Evidence from a Plant Retooling,” American Journal of Sociology, 2001 Born and raised in New York City, Fernandez received his BA from Harvard College in 1978. He received his MA (specializing in organizations and quantitative methodology) and PhD from the department of sociology at the University of Chicago. He has previously been on the faculties of the University of Arizona (in the department of sociology), Northwestern University (joint between the department of sociology and Center for Urban Affairs and Policy Research), and Stanford University Graduate School of Business. While at Northwestern, Fernandez was an active participant in the NSF-funded Urban Poverty and Social Policy Research and Training Program, which was administered jointly with the University of Chicago.

Frank F. Furstenberg, Jr.
Zellerbach Family Professor of Sociology, University of Pennsylvania
Frank Furstenberg is the Zellerbach Family Professor of Sociology and Research associate in the Population Studies Center at the University of Pennsylvania. His interest in the American family began at Columbia University where he received his Ph.D. in 1967. His most recent book is Managing to Make It: Urban Families in High-Risk Neighborhoods, with Thomas Cook, Jacquelynne Eccles, Glen Elder, and Arnold Sameroff (1999). His previous books and articles center on children, youth, families, and the public. His current research projects focus on the family in the context of disadvantaged urban neighborhoods, adolescent sexual behavior, cross national research on children's well-being, and urban education. He is a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and the Institute of Medicine.

Harry J. Holzer
Professor of Public Policy and Associate Dean, Georgetown Public Policy Institute
Harry Holzer joined the Georgetown Public Policy Institute as Professor of Public Policy in the Fall of 2000, and is also currently a Senior Affiliate of the National Poverty Center at the University of Michigan, a National Fellow of the Program on Inequality and Social Policy at Harvard University, and a Research Affiliate of the Institute for Research on Poverty at the University of Wisconsin at Madison. Prior to coming to Georgetown, Professor Holzer served as Chief Economist for the U.S. Department of Labor, Senior Fellow at the Urban Institute, and professor of economics at Michigan State University. Over most of his career, Professor Holzer's research has focused primarily on the low-wage labor market, and particularly the problems of minority workers in urban areas. In recent years he has focused on employer skill needs and hiring practices, as well as the employment problems of less-educated young men. His research on urban poverty and social policy has been funded by grants from the Joyce Foundation, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, the Rockefeller Foundation, the Institute for Research on Poverty, the Upjohn Institute, the U.S. Department of Labor, the National Science Foundation, and the Public Policy Institute of California. He has also received support from the Russell Sage and Ford foundations for his Multi-City Project on Urban Inequality, which has generated a unique matched dataset on both low-wage workers and employers in a number of U.S. metropolitan areas.

Alan B. Krueger
Bendheim Professor of Economics and Public Policy, Princeton University
Alan Krueger's primary research and teaching interests are in the general areas of labor economics, education, industrial relations, and social insurance. He is the author of Education Matters: A Selection of Essays on Education, coauthor of Myth and Measurement: The New Economics of the Minimum Wage, and the editor of the Journal of the European Economic Association. His current research projects include a study of the effect of economic growth on employment and income of less skilled workers, an examination of the effect of education on economic growth across nations, a study of the relationship between school quality and student outcomes, and an analysis of the impact of technological change on the labor market. He writes a monthly column on economics for The New York Times. He has also been named a Sloan fellow, an NBER Olin fellow, was elected a fellow of the Econometric Society, and was awarded the Kershaw Prize by the Association for Public Policy and Management in 1997. He was elected a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in 2002, and awarded the Mahalanobis Memorial Medal by the Indian Econometric Society in 2001. He served as the chief economist of the U.S. Department of Labor in 1994–95. Alan Krueger is the director of the Survey Research Center, and the Industrial Relations Section at Princeton University. He received his Ph.D. in economics from Harvard University.

Steven D. Levitt
Alvin H. Baum Professor of Economics, University of Chicago
Steven D. Levitt is Alvin H. Baum Professor of Economics at the University of Chicago, as well as a research fellow at the American Bar Foundation. He received his Ph.D. in Economics from M.I.T. in 1994. His primary research focus in recent years has been on crime and the criminal justice system, including studies of the cost-effectiveness of police and prisons and affirmative action in policing. Current research includes economic models of crime and corruption, the criminal justice system, abortion legalization, and school choice. Levitt received the John Bates Clark Medal in 2003, awarded every two years by the American Economics Association to the outstanding economist under the age of 40. He is the co-author, with Stephen Dubner, of Freakonomics: A Rogue Economist Explores the Hidden Side of Everything.

Susan E. Mayer
Dean, Irving B. Harris Graduate School of Public Policy, University of Chicago
Susan E. Mayer is dean and an associate professor at the Irving B. Harris Graduate School of Public Policy Studies and at the College at the University of Chicago, and is the past director of the Northwestern University/University of Chicago Joint Center for Poverty Research. She also serves as a faculty affiliate with the University's Center for Human Potential and Public Policy. Mayer received her Ph.D. in sociology from Northwestern University in 1986. She was a research associate at the Institute for Policy Studies at Northwestern University before joining the faculty of the Harris School in 1989. Mayer is the author of several articles and book chapters on the measurement of poverty, the consequences for poor children of growing up in poor neighborhoods, and the effect of income on children's well-being and the social and political consequences of economic inequality and segregation. She is the author of the book, What Money Can't Buy: Family Income and Children's Life Chances (Harvard University Press) and co-editor with Paul Peterson of the book, Earning and Learning: How Schools Matter (Brookings Institution Press). Mayer's current research is on the effect of economic mobility across generations and the role of non-cognitive skills on social and economic success.

Sara S. McLanahan
Professor of Sociology and Public Affairs, Princeton University
Sara McLanahan is a professor of Sociology and Public Affairs at Princeton University. She is a faculty associate of the Office of Population Research and is the founder and director of the Bendheim-Thoman Center for Research on Child Wellbeing.  She currently serves as Editor-in-Chief of The Future of Children, a journal dedicated to providing research and analysis to promote effective policies and programs for children.  She is the past president of the Population Association of America, and has served on the National Academy of Sciences-Institute of Medicine Board on Children, Youth, and Families and the boards of the American Sociological Association and the Population Association of America. She currently serves on the Advisory Board for the National Poverty Center, the Board of Trustees for the William T. Grant Foundation, and the selection committee for the William T.Grant Young Scholars Award. She is the author of many articles and books including Fathers Under Fire: The Revolution in Child Support Enforcement (1998); Social Policies for Children (1996); Growing Up with a Single Parent (1994); Child Support and Child Wellbeing (1994); Child Support Assurance: Design Issues, Expected Impacts, and Political Barriers, as Seen from Wisconsin (1992); and Single Mothers and Their Children: A New American Dilemma (1986).

Lawerence M. Mead
Professor of Politics, New York University
Lawrence M. Mead is Professor of Politics at New York University, where he teaches public policy and American government. He has been a visiting professor at Harvard, Princeton, and the University of Wisconsin. He has also been a visiting fellow at Princeton and at the Hoover Institution at Stanford. Professor Mead is an expert on the problems of poverty and welfare in the United States. Among academics, he was the principal exponent of work requirements in welfare, the approach that now dominates national policy. He is also a leading scholar of the politics and implementation of welfare reform programs. His works have helped shape welfare reform in the United States and abroad. They include: Beyond Entitlement (Free Press, 1986); The New Politics of Poverty (Basic Books, 1992); The New Paternalism (edited, Brookings, 1997); Lifting Up the Poor (coauthored with Mary Jo Bane, Brookings, 2003); Government Matters: Welfare Reform in Wisconsin (Princeton University Press, 2004). Professor Mead has consulted with federal, state, and local governments in this country and with several countries abroad. He testifies regularly to Congress on poverty, welfare, and social policy, and he often comments on these subjects in the media. He is a native of Huntington, New York, and a graduate of Amherst College. He received his Ph.D. in political science from Harvard University.

Robert Moffitt
Krieger-Eisenhower Professor, Johns Hopkins University
Robert Moffitt has been Professor of Economics at Johns Hopkins since September 1995. Prior to assuming his position at Johns Hopkins, Professor Moffitt was Professor of Economics at Brown University, where he taught for eleven years. He has also been a visiting professor at the University of Wisconsin and the University of Maryland, and worked for several years at Mathematica Policy Research, Inc. Moffitt is a member of the Board of Editors of the American Economic Review, a past coeditor of the Review of Economics and Statistics, and past editor of the Journal of Human Resources. He serves on several government advisory committees and commissions and is a member of the Commission on the Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education at the National Research Council. Moffitt's research is in the areas of labor economics and applied microeconometrics. Much of his published research has concerned single mothers and the U.S. welfare system, including the AFDC, Food Stamp, and Medicaid programs. He has also studied social insurance programs, including Social Security, unemployment insurance and Disability insurance, as well as of the U. S. income tax system. His other work includes various studies of the U.S. labor market (the business cycle and real wages, wage volatility, earnings inequality, labor mobility), of state government decision-making, and various studies in population economics and economic demography (marriage, cohabitation, female headship and fertility). His methodological and econometric research has covered issues in selection bias and limited-dependent variable models, nonlinear budget constraints, panel data, attrition, duration models and causal modeling and program evaluation.

Ann Shola Orloff
Professor of Sociology, Northwestern University
Ann Shola Orloff's areas of interest include political sociology, historical and comparative sociology, sociology of gender, and social (including feminist) theory. Her research has focused on states, politics and gender, particularly in the social policies of the developed world. Orloff is the author of two books, States, Markets, Families: Gender, Liberalism and Social Policy in Australia, Canada, Great Britain and the United States (with Julia O'Connor and Sheila Shaver; Cambridge, 1999) and The Politics of Pensions: A Comparative Analysis of Canada, Great Britain and the United States (Wisconsin, 1993); she is also co-editor of two books, Remaking Modernity: Politics, History and Sociology (with Julia Adams and Elisabeth Clemens; Duke, 2004) and The Politics of Social Policy in the United States (with Margaret Weir and Theda Skocpol; Princeton, 1988). She is at work on a manuscript, tentatively entitled Farewell to Maternalism?, that examines shifts in the gendered logics of welfare and employment policies in the U.S., Sweden, the Netherlands, France and Hungary. Orloff continues to co-edit the journal she helped to found, Social Politics: International Studies in Gender, State and Society; the journal is a forum for research on gender, politics and policy, as well as feminist theory, from all areas of the world. Orloff is also affiliated with the departments of Political Science and Gender Studies, the Institute for Policy Research, and the Center for International and Comparative Studies (CICS). She is the director of the new Center for Comparative and Historical Analysis, located in CICS, and is the President of the International Sociological Association's Research Committee 19, on Poverty, Social Welfare and Social Policy. Orloff has held visiting positions at the European University Institute (Florence, Italy) and the Australian National University, and has been the recipient of a German Marshall Fellowship. A graduate of Harvard University, she received a Ph.D. from Princeton University in 1985.

John D. Stephens
Gerhard E. Lenski, Jr., Distinguished Professor of Political Science and Sociology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
John D. Stephens received his B.A. (1970) from Harvard University and his Ph.D. (1976) from Yale University. His main interests are comparative politics and political economy, with area foci on Europe and the Caribbean. He teaches European politics and the political economy of advanced industrial societies. He is the author of The Transition from Capitalism to Socialism (1979) and coauthor of Democratic Socialism in Jamaica (with Evelyne Huber, 1986), Capitalist Development and Democracy (with Evelyne Huber and Dietrich Rueschemeyer, 1992), and Development and Crisis of the Welfare State (with Evelyne Huber, 2001). He has also contributed articles to, among others, The American Political Science Review, American Journal of Sociology, American Sociological Review, The British Journal of Sociology, Comparative Politics, Comparative Political Studies, Comparative Social Research, and World Politics. He is currently working on a study of the impact of neo-liberal economic reform of social policy in Latin America, Iberia, and the Antipodes.

R. Kent Weaver
Professor of Public Policy and Government, Georgetown University
Kent Weaver joined the Government Department and the Public Policy Institute at Georgetown in the Fall of 2002, after 19 years at the Brookings Institution. Before going to Brookings, Weaver taught in the Political Science Department at the Ohio State University for two years. He received his Ph.D. in Political Science from Harvard University. Weaver's major fields of interest are American and comparative social policy, comparative political institutions, and the politics of expertise. He is particularly interested in understanding how political institutions, past policy choices and the motivations of politicians interact to shape public policy choices. Much of his work has attempted to understand when and why politicians undertake actions that appear to offer more political risks than rewards, and how they attempt to avoid blame when they do so. Weaver is the author of Ending Welfare As We Know It (Brookings, 2000), Automatic Government: Indexation (Brookings, 1988) and The Politics of Industrial Change (Brookings, 1985). He is also the co-author and editor of The Collapse of Canada? (Brookings, 1992) and co-editor of and contributor to numerous books including Do Institutions Matter?: Government Capabilities in the U.S. and Abroad (Brookings, 1993), Think Tanks and Civil Societies (TransAction Publishers, 2000), and The Government Taketh Away: The Politics of Pain in the United States and Canada (Georgetown University Press, 2003). From 2002 to 2002, he served as co-director of the Welfare Reform & Beyond Initiative at Brookings, which sought to build a better understanding of social science research findings among policymakers and advocates in the lead-up to congressional debate on reauthorization of welfare reform legislation. He is currently completing a book on what the United States can learn from the experiences of other advanced industrial countries in reforming their public pension systems. He is also writing another book on how states have implemented welfare reform legislation in the United States.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

   
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