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Galbraith Scholars 2002

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Galbraith Scholars program 2002

Introducing the Galbraith Scholars

Ibijoke Akinola
Yale University

Chiraag Bains
Yale University

Rufus Caine
Boston College

Fulton Christopher Eaglin
Morehouse College

Alonzo Emery
Yale University

Laurie Jaekel
Northwestern University

Gisele Roget
Yale University

Sachin Shivaram
Harvard University

Marissa Shrum
Vanderbilt University

Jennifer Sims
Hampton University

Hector Suarez
Colorado College

Dale Vieregge
Northwestern University

Terrenda White
Northwestern University

Randolph Wiggins
Princeton University

 

Profiles

Ibijoke Akinola
Yale University

Ibijoke AkinolaIbijoke is a rising senior at Yale College where she is pursuing a BA in Sociology. The daughter of West African immigrants, she is currently conducting research supported by the Andrew W. Mellon foundation on the identity formation process of first generation African Americans and the extent to which they maintain ties to their immigrant parents’ countries of origin. Her research will form the basis of her senior thesis. Her inquiry into immigrant adaptation and the societal reception of successive U.S.-born generations, and her upbringing in the predominantly African-American and Latino neighborhood of Spanish Harlem, have enabled her to witness and experience firsthand the detrimental consequences engendered by discrimination and an unequal distribution of resources for positive growth. As an alumna of the International Youth Leadership institute (IYLI) she has also studied social problems in a cross-cultural context by participating in IYLI seminars on critical local and global issues and conducting ethnographic studies within rural and small town communities in Egypt and Mexico. Ibijoke has also been a cast member in two Broadway musicals, a member of Yaledancers, and loves the performing arts. She is excited about participating in the Galbraith Program, which will allow her to interact with other students interested in promoting positive social change and provide a focus for investigating policies, strategies, and recommendations for addressing the needs of those who, due to lack of opportunities for socio-economic mobility, endure societal pathologies.

Chiraag Bains
Yale University

Chiraag BainsChiraag is a rising senior at Yale, double majoring in History and Ethnicity, Race & Migration. He is a leader in the minority community at Yale, serving as the Moderator of the Asian American Students Alliance and helping to found the Pan-Ethnic Coalition. Next year he will be an Ethnic Counselor for new students. Chiraag is committed to improving the criminal justice system, addressing such issues as racial profiling and disproportionate incarceration rates. In New Haven, he works with People Against Injustice, a group fighting for fair bail in the city’s courts, and the Juvenile Rights Advocacy Project, which aims to educate high school students about their rights ininteractions with police. He has also just finished his tenure as Editor of the Yale Journal of Human Rights and Type Magazine, Yale’s publication on race and class. Chiraag has worked for the Department of Justice on racial conflict mediation and has helped create a worker-run factory in India to reduce child labor in the brass industry. This summer, he will work on housing issues in Bridgeport, Connecticut. A 2002 Truman Scholar, he plans to become a civil rights lawyer and fight discrimination in law enforcement. In his free time he enjoys playing basketball and honing his skills as a hip hop and bhangra DJ.

Rufus Caine
Boston College

Rufus CaineRufus will graduate from Boston College with a degree in Political Science and Philosophy. Having served as director of a movement he established called the "Fight for Freedom," this campaign sought to end modern day slavery in Sudan. As a result of this campaign, hundreds of Sudanese slaves were potentially freed from a life of bondage, $13,500 was raised for abolitionist purposes, and a significant portion of his community was educated about the atrocity of modern-day slavery. Rufus currently spends his time developing an initiative he co-founded called "Bridging the Gap–an AIDS Education Program" for urban youth. He can also be found serving his third year in University Government or his third year as member of a gospel choir called Voices of Imani. His interests include enjoyable books, fine dining, quality music, and good conversation. Recently named a 2002 Truman Scholar and BC’s own Martin Luther King, Jr. Scholar, Rufus remains committed to civil rights law. As an attorney he seeks to perfect the central promise of America in securing equality, liberty, and justice for all.

Fulton Christopher Eaglin
Morehouse College

Christopher EaglinA recipient of the Bank of America Scholarship and the Candle in the Dark Academic Scholarship, and of Top Honors in the Goldman Sachs Global Leader program, Mr. Eaglin is pursuing a degree in Economics and Mathematics at Morehouse. He is the student director of the Morehouse Executive Lecture Series, Assistant Mangaging Editor of the Morehouse student newspaper, Director of Academic Affairs of the Morehouse Student Government Association, and Interim President of the Atlanta University Center Student Government Association. He has spent his summers working as a Research Assistant at the University of Michigan Business School; as a project management/marketing intern at Johnson Controls, Inc., in Plymouth, Michigan; and as a Strategy/Business Analyst with BP p.l.c. in London, where he completed a project assessing market demand of retail motor fuels and convenience retailing in the U.S. and Europe. This summer, he will continue to conduct research at the Georgia State Department of Economics on macroeconomic uncertainty and private investment in West African countries. In addition, he is currently developing a program to take fifteen urban high school seniors to Ghana with Habitat for Humanity.

Alonzo Emery
Yale University

Alonzo EmeryAlonzo's recent academic and professional pursuits stem from a longstanding interest in social policy; an interest which has led to a variety of related work and study opportunities both in the U.S. and abroad. His work abroad has included a summer internship with a political organization sponsored by the
Council of Europe—the International Federation of Liberal Youth—charged with organizing world conferences on issues related to human rights and development as well as gender, race, and age discrimination. As a conference coordinator, Alonzo worked out of offices in Brussels, Belgium, and Strasbourg, France, helping a team of development experts run a summit in Kiev, Ukraine, on the topic of “Globalization, Integration and Development.” He remains under this organization’s employ as their representative to the United Nations. This position has obliged Alonzo to attend and issue reports on the UN World Youth Forum held this summer in Dakar, Senegal, and the UN World Conference Against Racism that took place in Durban, South Africa, where he served both on the NGO Declaration’s drafting committee for environmental racism and also as a rapporteur on housing discrimination. Most recently he ran several workshops related to the work of the United Nations for their Spring Seminar held in Helsinki, Finland.

While working in Cape Town, South Africa, last year Alonzo worked with a student survey team for the South African Ministry of Housing, completing a land tenure and housing development project in a local township. Beyond construction obligations, his team's task was to assess race relations in the area after the Housing Ministry's intervention and its effects on integrating historically divided black and ‘coloured’ communities. They presented their report to the Ministry of Housing and it is being used as part of a five year auditing of its housing program.Other recent activities include work with Yale Law School's clinical practice for the Housing Authority of New Haven and senior thesis research, which compares spatial integration strategies in three site areas that he has visited in the past year under fellowship funding: Cape Town, South Africa; Buenos Aires, Argentina; and New Haven, Connecticut.

For the two years following graduation Alonzo will serve as a Yale-China Fellow, working on a community development project in Ningbo, China, where he will both teach and examine housing policy reform in urban areas of China. His experience serves to facilitate his long-term goal of entering a Ph.D. program in Government and Social Policy, focusing on domestic and international housing programs in order to prepare for a career as Executive Director of UN Habitat.

Laurie Jaekel
Northwestern University

Laurie JaekelA rising senior at Northwestern University, Laurie is actively involved in housing advocacy and community service. Last summer she interned for the National Low Income Housing Coalition and was integrally involved in their campaign to institute a national affordable housing trust fund. As a student living in the “Windy City,” much of Laurie’s activism has been inspired by her volunteer experiences with Chicago public housing residents. This coming summer she will conduct an in-depth study of the transformation of public housing and its effect on low-income families. On campus, Laurie is the director of the Northwestern Community Development Corps and devotes a large amount of her time toward increasing student activism in social justice issues. She is an American Studies major and plans to focus her senior thesis on the integration of affordable housing to the suburbs. When not volunteering, she enjoys running and watching The West Wing.

Gisele Roget
Yale University

Gisele RogetGisele has just completed her second year at Yale. She currently lives in Wynnewood, Pennsylvania, right outside of West Philadelphia. She is double majoring in French and Yale’s interdisciplinary program in Ethics, Politics and Economics. She is specifically interested in Marxist studies and the impact of globalization on the world’s workers. Outside of the classroom Gisele explores the implications of social inequality through the organizations in which she is involved. At Yale, Gisele is Chair of the Liberal Party and on the executive boards of Dwight Hall, the student run center for community service and social justice at Yale; Black Students at Yale; and the Yale Political Union. She hopes to go on to law school and to focus on casework concerning domestic and international labor agreements.

Sachin Shivaram
Harvard University

Sachin ShivaramSachin Shivaram is currently a rising senior at Harvard University, and next June he will graduate with an A.B. in History & Literature and Afro-American Studies. Sachin is originally from Milwaukee, Wisconsin, and has spent a
great deal of time in Mysore, India, where his family is from. Sachin’s academic work and extracurricular involvement with the NAACP, the Harvard Civil Rights Project, and an advocacy organization for low-income women are motivated by concerns about gender inequity in the United States. It is his
belief that the feminization of poverty is a key agent of perpetuating socio-political gender inequity that has brought him to the Galbraith Scholars program. This summer Sachin will be doing research on welfare policy at the Institute for Women’s Policy Research in Washington, DC, and will continue working on a story about post-rape depression with author Jamaica Kincaid. In his free time, Sachin enjoys playing basketball, weightlifting, and relaxing over a good meal. Sachin looks forward to running in his fourth marathon later this summer.

Marissa Shrum
Vanderbilt University

Marissa ShrumMarissa Shrum is a rising senior from Chattanooga, Tennessee. She is enrolled in the College of Arts and Sciences at Vanderbilt University and her academic focus is in the department of Sociology. As one of Vanderbilt’s E. Bronson Ingram scholars, she is establishing leadership skills in business while designing and implementing projects that address various needs of the Nashville community. She is also an active participant in Vanderbilt’s undergraduate Student Government Association and serves as the Speaker of the Senate. This summer she is the Program Assistant for the National Conference for Community and Justice which is a non-profit human relations organization dedicated to fighting bias, bigotry, and racism in America. She has just finished reading Rebecca Walker’s Black, White, and Jewish: Autobiography of a Shifting Self and identifies with the author’s multicultural background. Always recognizable because of her big hair, Marissa loves the city of London specifically for its diversity, and enjoys its history and ethnic cuisine!

Jennifer Sims
Hampton University

Jennifer SimsJennifer Sims, Jenn for short, is a 20-year-old Sagittarius from Nashville, Tennessee. At her Home by the Sea – Hampton University – she is a junior Sociology major and a member of the Honors College Program. Jenn is also a proud member of the 2001 Indoor/2002 Outdoor MEAC Championship Women's Track team. Aside from running, her hobbies include cheerleading, gymnastics, and practicing Espanol.



Hector Suarez
Colorado College

Hector SuarezHector was born in Torrance, California, on December 3, 1980, but has lived most of his life in the area of East Los Angeles, which he considers his home. He graduated from Garfield High School in 1999 and spent two years at Marymount College in Palos Verdes, California, before transferring last year to Colorado College where he is completing a major in Sociology and a minor in Philosophy. Both of his parents emigrated from Mexico and he is the first in his family to attend college. His interest in issues of social justice and inequality has grown out of his firsthand experience with many of the issues faced by immigrants and minorities in the U.S. – issues like the poverty-wage jobs his father has had to endure, like the substandard education he received up until high school, and like the health insurance his family cannot afford. His other strong academic interest is in the area of social theory and philosophy. Outside of academia his favorite thing to do is to travel. He is intrigued by the differences and similarities in how people live in different parts of the world. Before Colorado College he spent a semester studying abroad in London and had the opportunity to travel in several European countries. However, since international travel is rarely an option, he is content with a road trip to any place he's never been to.

Dale Vieregge
Northwestern University

Dale ViereggeRaised in an insular, rural community in southern Illinois, Dale was introduced to highly distorted notions of racial divisions from an early age. His hometown’s working-class residents developed strong preconceptions of different races and cultures in spite of their limited contact with people of color. Upon arriving at Northwestern, Dale was encouraged to consider different perspectives and to examine his experiences critically.
Structural explanations of race, coupled with an increased interaction with people of color on a human level, invalidated the cultural and pathological explanations of inequality that dominated the public discourse. Within the past year, two independent projects, countless academic colloquia, and closer relationships with faculty have sparked a passion to understand the complex nature of inequality, particularly with respect to race. Next spring, Dale will conclude his undergraduate career with a senior thesis in which he will theorize about the relationship between civil society, sociopolitical participation, and black empowerment. Specifically, he is interested in applying his model within the context of the election and administration of Harold Washington in Chicago (1983-1987). After completing the bachelor of arts in political science, he plans to enter a doctoral program that integrates his interests in urban and racial politics, social stratification, and public policy. Outside the classroom, Dale is a research assistant at the Institute for Policy Research and a volunteer at a community development organization in Chicago’s Woodlawn neighborhood.

Terrenda White
Northwestern University

Terrenda WhiteA granddaughter of southern sharecroppers unable to attend high school, and the daughter of parents raised in Jim Crow Atlanta unable to afford college, Terrenda White is proud to be graduating from Northwestern University with honors in Human Development and Psychological Services. Terrenda’s primary interests lie in academic research and social service that seeks to improve the quality of people’s human development by combating issues related to poverty and social inequality. A Bill Gates Millenium Scholar, Terrenda has participated in numerous research projects in welfare policy, mental health, and youth development both nationally and internationally. She has recently returned from studying abroad in Durban, South Africa, where she was able to attend the UN World Conference Against Racism and conducted months of independent, qualitative research on HIV/AIDS prevention initiatives among male youth in rural and urban areas. The research was presented in South Africa at the “Colloquium on HIV/AIDS and Gender” in April and is the subject of her senior honor’s thesis. Terrenda has been a participant in the “Minority Access to Research Careers” summer institute and was named a Millenium Fellow by the Society for Research in Child Development last year. Before graduate school, Terrenda will begin a two-year commitment helping to improve urban education as a Teach For America corps member in Los Angeles, California, in the Fall of 2002. In her social time, Terrenda enjoys singing with her campus gospel choir, dancing (African and hip-hop), and reading. She thanks God for her many opportunities and achievements.

Randolph Wiggins
Princeton University

Randolph WigginsBorn in Newark, New Jersey, on January 12, 1982, Randolph is the oldest of the five children of Rudolph and Margaret Wiggins and he has three younger sisters and a younger brother. He is a rising junior in the Woodrow Wilson School of Public and
International Affairs at Princeton. He is a Bill Gates Millennium Scholar as well as Vice Chair of Princeton's cultural center, The Third World Center. He also sits on the Princeton University Judiciary Committee, the Spirit of Princeton Committee, and the Princeton's Hallelujah Worship Committee. He is participating in the Galbraith Scholars program because he wishes to gain knowledge on his focus area in the Woodrow Wilson School, which is urban revitalization through education. His goal is to bring about real change in urban areas across the country so that one day all children can truly have the opportunity to achieve the American Dream. It is this desire, the desire to make real change, that drives him. He will spend his summer working at the Princeton University Investment Banking Company as an analyst as well as a Residential Advisor for
Princeton's Undergraduate Summer Program, The Freshman Scholars Institute. In the fall, he will continue his study of urban policy at the University of Oxford, where he will spend a semester. When he is not working, he enjoys spending quality time with loved ones and friends and getting to know people on a deep level. He enjoys meeting new people and traveling.

 

 

 

 

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