Asia Programs: Programs
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Julian Chang
donahueJulian Chang has served as the Executive Director of Asia Programs under the Center for Business Government since July 2001 and Director of the Kansai Keizai Doyukai Program since 2002. He received his PhD in political science from the Department of Government at Harvard University. At Harvard, Chang served as Residential Dean of Cabot House from 1993 to 1996, and worked in the University Development Office. He received his BA from Yale University and received a Yale-China fellowship to teach at Wuhan University, China.
In 1996, Dr. Chang went west to Stanford to become assistant director of the Center for East Asian Studies. In 1997 he helped to establish the Stanford Asia/Pacific Scholars Program, a university-wide fellowship program for graduate students from Asia. He joined Stanford’s Asia Pacific Research Center (A/PARC) as deputy director in the fall of 1998. His research interests include Sino-Soviet/Russian relations, communications, and mass media in China.

e: Julian_Chang@ksg.harvard.edu
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Amy Conly
Amy Conly, Program Administrator for the Vietnam Program, manages the Program's non-federal grants, helps to monitor its overall financial administration and participates with the Program Director, Senior Program Officer and Associate Director in the planning and implementation of new programmatic activities. Prior to joining the Vietnam Program, Conly worked as an accountant for non-profit clients at State Street Bank. She earned a BA from Smith College, majoring in French Literature and minoring in Economics. She spent her junior year studying at La Sorbonne in Paris and still very much enjoys traveling and studying other cultures, as well as listening to music, hiking, playing tennis and dancing.
e: amy_conly@ksg.harvard.edu
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David Dapice
David O. Dapice has served as the Vietnam Program’s principal Cambridge-based economist for nearly twenty years. He is also an associate professor of economics at Tufts University and a former department chair. Professor Dapice is an authority on the Vietnamese economy and has traveled to the country at least once a year since 1989. In recent years his research has examined an array of topics including provincial development, public investment and infrastructure development, and urbanization and the creation of affordable housing markets. Professor Dapice teaches regularly at the Fulbright School in Ho Chi Minh City and is actively involved in the continued development of its teaching programs.
Earlier in his career Professor Dapice served as advisor to the Indonesian Ministry of Finance and in the 1980s he advised the Bank Rakyat Indonesia (BRI) as it grew to become the country’s largest financial institution. He has also worked in Thailand, Cambodia, Myanmar/Burma, Mongolia, Cuba, and the Ukraine.
Professor Dapice holds a bachelors degree in political economy from Williams College and a master’s and doctorate in economics from Harvard.

e: david_dapice@ksg.harvard.edu
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Anne Doyle
Anne Doyle is the Vietnam Program's Senior Program Officer and is responsible for general management of all aspects of the Vietnam Program Cambridge-based operation. Anne returned to the Cambridge office in July 2003 after serving three years as the Vietnam Program's Country Coordinator plus Executive Director of the Fulbright Economic Teaching Program (FETP) in Ho Chi Minh City. Prior to joining the Vietnam Program, she taught high school math at the Lycee du Scare Coeur as a Peace Corps volunteer in N'Djamena, Chad. There, she also set up and managed a college and career counseling center as well as English language activities. She earned her bachelor's degree in management and her graduate degree in corporate tax management at the University of Paris IX-Daupine.
e: anne_doyle@ksg.harvard.edu
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Dennis J. Encarnation
encarnationDennis J. Encarnation, adjunct lecturer in public policy, is director of the Asia-Pacific Policy Program within CBG's Asia Programs. He joined the Harvard faculty in 1982 and taught for over a decade at the Harvard Business School. Prior to Harvard, he worked at the U.S. Office of Management and Budget and taught at Stanford University and Duke University, where he received a master's in public policy and a doctorate in political science. His research analyzes the international political economy, especially foreign investment and international trade by multinational corporations. He has authored five books and several articles focusing on comparative business-government relations from the perspective of multinational corporations managing foreign operations; host governments attracting or regulating multinationals; and multilateral organizations liberalizing member-state policies. He has conducted extensive field research from India to Japan, where he served as senior fellow in the Ministry of International Trade and Industry.
e: dennis_encarnation@ksg.harvard.edu
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Jessica Eykholt
Jessica Eykholt is the Program Coordinator for the China Public Policy Program. She also provides faculty support to Anthony Saich and Jay Rosengard. She received her MA in linguistics from the University of Iowa and her BA in English from Taiwan. Prior to joining CBG, Jessica worked as a
faculty assistant-specialist at KSG and spent 2 years as the administrative coordinator at the Harvard-Yenching Library. She has taught English in Taiwan and Japan and Chinese at UC San Diego.Away from the office, Jessica enjoys her homelife with her family, including her two dogs, and studying.
e: jessica_eykholt@ksg.harvard.edu
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Tony Gomez Ibanez
Gomez Ibanez Jose A. Gomez-Ibanez is the Derek C. Bok Professor of Urban Planning and Public Policy at Harvard University, where he holds a joint appointment at the Graduate School of Design and the John F. Kennedy School of Government. He teaches courses in economics, infrastructure and transportation policy in both schools.



e: jose_gomez-ibanez@Harvard.Edu
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Arnold Howitt
howittArnold M. Howitt is Executive Director of the Kennedy School's Taubman Center for State and Local Government, as well as Adjunct Lecturer in Public Policy. He is faculty chair or co-chair of KSG executive programs on Emergency Preparedness, Crisis Management, and of the Beijing Executive Public Training Training Program. For four years he directed KSG's research program on domestic preparedness for terrorism. Howitt served on an Institute of Medicine panel that authored Preparing for Terrorism (2002) and is co-author and co-editor of Countering Terrorism: Dimensions of Preparedness (2003). Howitt's other research focuses on transportation and environmental regulation. He served on a National Research Council panel that wrote Air Quality Management in the United States (2004). He is currently studying transportation and air pollution reduction in China. In addition, he wrote Managing Federalism, a study of the federal grant-in-aid system, and is coauthor and coeditor of Perspectives on Management Capacity Building. He received his BA from Columbia University and his MA and PhD in political science from Harvard University.
e: arnold_howitt@ksg.harvard.edu
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Stephane Lamour
Stéphane Lamour is the Financial Assistant for the Vietnam Program. His role entails processing and analyzing the program’s financial data, which includes field reporting and budgeting support. He earned a BA from Bentley College, majoring in Accounting Information Systems. Before joining the Vietnam Program he worked as an accountant and office manager for the Women of Color AIDS Council, Inc. Apart from his current duties in the Vietnam Program, Stéphane is active as a treasurer for the Forgotten Angels Foundation and is a business developer for a striving online community site called Haitianconnection.com. Originally from Haiti, Stéphane is passionate to learn and discover other cultures and its languages. Currently, Stéphane is studying Cantonese and Mandarin Chinese, Japanese, Greek, Portuguese and Tagalog. In addition, he loves culinary arts, martial arts, dancing, philanthropy, and entrepreneurship.
e: stephane_lamour@ksg.harvard.edu
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Laura Ma
Laura Ma is program coordinator for the China Public Policy Program. Laura received her Ph.D. in Ancient Near Eastern History in 1994, and was a teaching faculty at the University of International Business and Economics in Beijing. Before joining M-RCBG, Laura worked at Harvard University's LASPAU: Academic and Professional Programs for the Americas. Away from the office she enjoys time with her two daughters.
e: laura_ma@ksg.harvard.edu
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Kathy O'Brien

 

 


e: kathleen_o'brien@harvard.edu
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Dwight Perkins
Vietnam Program, Harold Hitchings Burbank Professor of Political Economy
Professor Perkins is former Chair of the Economics Department at Harvard University.  He led the Harvard Institute for International Development for fifteen years (1980-1995). He is a leading expert on the industrialization of East Asia and has authored or edited twelve books on the region’s economic history and development. Professor Perkins has served as an advisor or consultant on economic policy and reform to the governments of Korea, China, Malaysia, and Vietnam.  At his initiative Harvard began its engagement with Vietnam in the late 1980s. He has been a contributing aurthor of several Harvard studies of the Vietnamese economy including In Search of the Dragon’s Trail (1994) and Choosing Success (2008).

e:
dwight_perkins@ksg.harvard.edu class="greenlistlink">

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Jonathan Pincus
Jonathan Pincus is the Academic Dean of the Fulbright School in Ho Chi Minh City and is a development economist specializing in Southeast Asia. His research has focused on issues of agrarian change, poverty, inequality and labor markets. Prior to joining the Vietnam Program, Pincus was Senior Country Economist, UNDP Vietnam, where he designed and implemented UNDPís policy advisory and dialogue projects with the Vietnamese government. Before his UNDP assignment he was a lecturer in economics and faculty chair of the masters program in economics at the School of Oriental and African Studies, University of London. He received a BA from Oberlin College and his masters and doctoral degrees from the University of Cambridge. Pincus has lived and worked in Southeast Asia for two decades, including extended assignments in Indonesia, Vietnam and the Philippines.
e: jonathan_pincus@harvard.edu
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Jay Rosengard
Jay Rosengard, Lecturer in Public Policy, has 30 years of international experience designing, implementing, and evaluating development policies in: public finance and fiscal strategy, tax reform, municipal finance and management, intergovernmental fiscal relations, banking and financial institutions development, microfinance, management information systems, monitoring and evaluation, human resource development, and public administration. He has worked for a wide variety of multilateral and bilateral donors, as well as directly for host governments and private sector clients. Rosengard is currently Director of the Mossavar-Rahmani Center for Business and Government's Financial Sector Program, which focuses on the development of bank and nonbank financial institutions and alternative financing instruments. This includes microfinance (small-scale lending and local savings mobilization), mainstream commercial banking (general and special-purpose banks), and wholesale financial intermediation (municipal development funds, venture capital funds, pooled financing, secondary mortgage facilities, and securitization). Rosengard is also Faculty Chair of both the FIPED (Financial Institutions for Private Enterprise Development) Executive Program, which focuses on sustainable and effective microfinance and SME (small and medium enterprise) finance, and the COMTAX (Comparative Tax Policy and Administration) Executive Program, which addresses key strategic and tactical issues in tax design and implementation.

Tony Saich
saichTony Saich is Daewoo Professor of International Affairs; director and faculty chair of Asia Programs at the Mossavar Rahmani Center for Business and Government; and director and faculty chair of the China Public Policy Program; and as of 2006, the Director of Harvard University's Asia Center. From 1994 until July 1999, he was the representative for the China Office of the Ford Foundation. Prior to this, he was director of the Sinological Institute at Leiden University, the Netherlands. His teaching and research focus on the interplay between state and society in Asia and the respective roles they play in determining policymaking and framing socioeconomic development. He has written several books on developments in China, including China: Politics and Government; Revolutionary Discourse in Mao's China (with David E. Apter); and The Rise to Power of the Chinese Communist Party. He studied political science in the U.K. and has taught in universities in England, Holland, and the U.S. Away from the office, he enjoys time his two children, movies and soccer.
e: anthony_saich@ksg.harvard.edu
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Jay S. Siegel
Jay S. Siegel is a Senior Research Fellow presently focusing on policy analysis in China in the areas of labor relations and dispute resolution in the workplace. As Senior Advisor-Labor Relations to the U.S. Department of Labor-Chinese Ministry of Labour and Social Security joint Labor Law Cooperative Project in 2004-5, he presented seminars in China on U.S. labor relations practices and assisted in a review and analysis of Chinese labor laws. Earlier, as an Adjunct Lecturer at the Kennedy School, he taught labor-management policy analysis and dispute resolution (negotiation, mediation & arbitration) skills. While at Harvard he also did research in Japan on lifetime employment policy as a Fulbright Scholar in the ‘Japan Today’ Program. Prior to Harvard he was in private law practice and was elected national chairman of the Labor & Employment Section of the American Bar Association. During this time he also served as Special Labor Counsel to the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System. A member of the Fulbright Senior Specialists Roster, he has lectured on labor and employment matters in China, Japan, Korea and Russia as well as written book chapters and presented research papers at international conferences on various subjects in the labor and employment field. He holds a B.A. in political science and a J.D. in law from New York University.


e:.jsiegel@ksg.harvard.edu

Thomas Vallely
sternThomas J. Vallely is the Director of the Vietnam Program, a position he has held since its inception in 1989. Mr. Vallely uses the Program’s research to engage in a candid and constructively critical dialogue with the Vietnamese government about the strategic challenges confronting the country. Under Mr. Valley’s leadership the Fulbright School has emerged as a center of excellence in public policy research and teaching and a pioneer in the development of new modes of institutional governance in Vietnam.
A primary focus of Mr. Vallely’s current work is institutional innovation in Vietnamese higher education and science. He draws on the Program’s experience designing and developing innovative educational initiatives in Vietnam to pursue a dialogue about higher education reform with Vietnamese and international stakeholders. Mr. Vallely highlights the central importance of governance to achieving better outcomes in higher education and believes that international universities must revise current paradigms of academic exchange in order to effectively support institutional innovation in Vietnam.
Mr. Vallely has also worked in Cambodia, Myanmar/Burma, Mongolia, and the Ukraine. In these countries he has focused on the political economy of reform. Prior to becoming Director of the Vietnam Program, Mr. Vallely was a Senior Research Fellow at the Kennedy School, where he worked on strategic and military issues in east and Southeast Asia.  He has worked as a political consultant and was elected to the Massachusetts House of Representatives in 1980, serving until 1987.  Mr. Vallely received a B.Sc. from the University of Massachusetts/Boston and an M.P.A. from the Kennedy School. Mr. Vallely served with the United States Marine Corps in Vietnam.

e: thomas_vallely@ksg.harvard.edu
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Ben Wilkinson
Ben Wilkinson is the Associate Director of the Vietnam Program and plays a critical role as the program's chief representative in Vietnam. Wilkinson oversees all activities of the Ho Chi Minh City-based Fulbright Economics Teaching Program (FETP), the preeminent public policy research and training center in Vietnam. Prior to joining the Vietnam Program he worked as a legal intern in Tokyo, an Internet entrepreneur in Boston, and a travel writer across Southeast Asia. He has studied Vietnamese history and literature at Vietnam National University and law at Harvard Law School. Wilkinson earned his bachelor's degree in East Asian Studies, with a focus on modern Vietnamese history, from Harvard University. He speaks fluent Vietnamese.
e: ben_wilkinson@ksg.harvard.edu
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Brenda Costello Williamson
Brenda Costello Williamson is Asia Programs' Associate Director for Finance and Personnel. In this position, she focuses on working with the various programs and initiatives in the Center to assist them with budget preparations and monitoring. She has been an employee of Harvard for 19 years and her most recent position was financial analyst in the Kennedy School's Office of Financial Services. She attended Boston Business School and earned an associate of science in accounting. Brenda lives in Natick where she spends her spare time with her husband and two children.

e: brenda_costello_williamson@ksg.harvard.edu
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