Consortium for Energy Policy Research at Harvard

ENERGY POLICY COURSES OFFERED AT BOSTON-AREA UNIVERSITIES

Academic Year 2013-2014


Harvard University
Spring 2014 courses


Benefit-Cost Analysis
API-139M
Harvard Kennedy School
Nick Nichols,Nick Robinson
Spring 2014 Module 3 (show academic calendar)
TuTh 2:40 p.m. - 4:00 p.m. HKS RBST RG20
Credits
0.50 Credit Level
Graduate
Description
Benefit-cost analysis is a widely used set of tools for evaluating alternative policies and specific projects. This module covers the basic components of such analysis, including estimating impacts, valuing outcomes using market prices, valuing outcomes (such as environmental quality, health, and longevity) that are not as easily measured in monetary terms, and the treatment of uncertainty. Class sessions use a mix of lectures, discussion, and case studies to explore practical issues in conducting such analyses as well as conceptual and theoretic foundations. The module is intended both for those interested in conducting benefit-cost analyses and for those who wish to become more informed consumers or critics of such analyses. The instructors will assume that students have some prior training in microeconomics at the level of API-101 or API-105 or higher, or equivalent courses taken prior to HKS. Students unsure of the adequacy of their preparation should meet with one of the instructors.
Textbook Information
Currently no textbook information is available for this course. Please check back or visit the Harvard Coop.
Cross Registration
Eligible for cross-registration
With permission of instructor/subject to availability

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Energy Policy Analysis (API-164) 
Harvard Kennedy School    Spring 2014    
Joseph Aldy 

Description: This course provides an overview of energy policy issues with an emphasis on the analysis necessary to frame, design, and evaluate policy remedies to energy problems. The course is intended for doctoral students interested but not necessarily specializing in energy issues. The course is offered in support of the Harvard University Center for the Environment (HUCE) Graduate Consortium on Energy and Environment http://environment.harvard.edu/student-resources/graduate-consortium. Prerequisites: Multivariate calculus. Permission of the instructor required.
Credits: 1.00 Location: HKS LITTR L382

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Energy and Climate Law and Policy (2025) 
Harvard Law School    Spring 2014    
Jody Freeman 

Description:
This course integrates traditional U.S. energy law with U.S. climate law. Topics covered include: federal and state laws governing electricity regulation and transmission; coal, natural gas, nuclear and renewable power; energy efficiency; federal climate policy under the Clean Air Act; oil and alternatives to oil for the transportation sector; state clean energy programs; and energy security. The materials will raise interesting questions about the federalism, regulatory design, economic, and technological challenges in this space, and will push students to confront the obstacles to aligning the (sometimes) conflicting goals of energy and environmental policy. The animating question for the course is: what legal infrastructure is necessary to facilitate a transition to cleaner energy, while controlling costs, ensuring system resilience, and protecting national security? Readings will include traditional legal materials such as cases and statutes (we will use a casebook on energy law) but also a variety of supplementary policy documents drawn from government, nonprofit, academic and private sector sources.
There are no pre-requisites although the survey course in environmental law will be helpful.
Course evaluation will consist of substantive and rigorous weekly commentaries on the readings.
Providing there are available seats, the course will be open to students from other Harvard Schools and Departments, and to MIT and Tufts students who are permitted to cross-register. Credits: 3.00000000

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Energy and the Environment (ENVR E-102 (21783)) 
Harvard Extension School    Spring 2014    
Petros Koutrakis PhD, Professor of Environmental Sciences, Harvard School of Public Health - Ramon Sanchez ScD, Assistant Director of the Sustainability and Environmental Management Program, Harvard Extension School - Zachary D. Zevitas BS, Environment Editor, Science Network 

Description: This course examines the relationship between energy and the environment in our global society. It analyzes the driving forces that influence the production and consumption of energy to evaluate their impacts on environmental quality, human health, and social equity. At the end of this course students are able to understand and assess the pros and cons of conventional and renewable energy systems, issues surrounding new transportation technologies, energy intensity of food production, effects of supply chain management and international commerce in energy security, energy management in buildings, and the mechanisms needed to evolve into sustainable energy operations in the green economy for the twenty-first century. Topics include natural gas, fracking, the concept of clean coal, carbon sequestration and storage projects, the rise of solar and wind power, biofuels production, hybrid and electric vehicles, sustainable transportation technologies, green buildings, and energy used in organic farming. Prerequisites: high school biology and chemistry.
Credits: 4

Location: Maxwell-Dworkin G115

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Energy: Perspectives, Problems, and Prospects (ENVR E-103 (23883)) 
Harvard Extension School    Spring 2014    
Michael B. McElroy PhD, Gilbert Butler Professor of Environmental Studies, Harvard University - Xi Lu PhD, Lecturer on Environmental Science and Public Policy, Harvard University 

Description: The course provides an historical account of the evolution of the modern energy system, from early dependence on human and animal power, to the subsequent use of wind and water, to more recent reliance on fossil fuels coal, oil and natural gas and even more recently to the development of the ability to tap the energy contained in the nucleus. It discusses the important historical advances in the applications of energy, notably in the production and distribution of electricity and in the transportation sector where oil-derived products provide the motive force for cars, trucks, trains, ships, and planes. It highlights the energy related problems we confront today, with particular emphasis on air pollution, on the threat of global climate change, on the hazards of nuclear proliferation, and on the risks to national security imposed by our increasing reliance on imported sources of oil. It concludes with a discussion of options for a more sustainable energy future. The recorded lectures are from the Harvard Faculty of Arts and Sciences course Science of the Physical Universe 25. Prerequisite: background of high school algebra and trigonometry.

Credits: 4

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Engineering Sciences 20 - How to Create Things and Have Them Matter (9676) 
Faculty of Arts and Sciences    Spring 2013-2014    
David A. Edwards 

Description: This aspirational design course teaches students to generate, develop and realize breakthrough ideas in the arts, sciences, and engineering. Students learn basic skills of engineering design, brainstorming, prototyping, and public presentations. Funding is available for continued project development following the course. This year's theme is "Energy of the Future.

Credits: Half course

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Engineering Sciences 229 - Survey of Energy Technology (94822) 
Faculty of Arts and Sciences    Spring 2013-2014    
Michael J. Aziz 

Description: Principles governing energy generation and interconversion. Current and projected world energy use. Selected important current and anticipated future technologies for energy generation, interconversion, storage, and end usage.
Credits: Half course

Prerequisite(s): Calculus of a single variable, one semester of college-level physics, and familiarity with chemistry at the high school advanced placement level.

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Engineering Sciences 231 - Energy Technology (1486) 
Faculty of Arts and Sciences    Spring 2013-2014    
Michael J. Aziz 

Description: Principles governing energy generation and interconversion. Current and projected world energy use. Selected important current and anticipated future technologies for energy generation, interconversion, storage, and end usage.
Credits: Half course

Prerequisite(s): One semester of college-level calculus-based physics and familiarity with chemistry at the high school advanced placement level.

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Engineering Sciences 6 - Environmental Science and Technology (2969) 
Faculty of Arts and Sciences    Spring 2013-2014    
Chad D. Vecitis, Anas Chalah, and Patrick D. Ulrich 

Description: An introduction to the role of technology in the environmental sciences, with foci on energy and water topics. The basic scientific principles underlying human use and control of the environment are emphasized. The course includes several field trips.
Credits: Half course

Prerequisite(s): The course presumes basic knowledge in chemistry, physics, and mathematics at the high school level.

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Environmental Law and Policy Clinic (8008) 
Harvard Law School    Spring 2014    
Wendy B Jacobs 

Description:
Required Class Component: This clinic requires that students have taken or are currently taking at least one of the course listed below.
Additional Co-/Pre-Requisites:The following courses have some seats reserved for clinical students: Public Interest Environmental Litigation.
The following courses do not have any seats reserved for clinical students: Climate and Energy Law; Environmental Law; Environmental Practice Skills, Methods and Controversies: Siting and Permitting a Wind Farm; Environmental Advocacy: Citizen Suits; Environmental Advocacy: Administrative Hearings / Working with Scientists and Experts Seminar; Federal Public Land and Resources Law; International Environmental Law; Natural Resources Law; Water Law; Environmental Dispute Resolution; Advanced Environmental Law in Theory and Application; or Human Rights and the Environment.
By Permission: No.
Add/Drop Deadline: January 17, 2013.
LLM Students: LLM students may apply to this clinic by submitting an application.
Placement Site: Some clinical placements are at HLS, while others are at various externship locations.
The Emmett Environmental Law and Policy Clinic (ELPC) offers students an opportunity to do hands-on, meaningful, real-life, and real-time environmental regulatory, policy and advocacy work. Clinic offerings include local, national, and international projects covering the spectrum of environmental issues, under the leadership of Director and Clinical Professor Wendy Jacobs. Clinic students work on policy projects and white papers, regulatory and statutory drafting and comments, manuals and guidance to help non-lawyers identify and protect their rights, litigation and advocacy work, including developing case strategies, research and drafting briefs (filed in state and federal courts, including the U.S. Supreme Court), preparing witnesses and their testimony, meeting with clients and attending and presenting at administrative and court hearings. Our clients include state and municipal governments, non-governmental organizations, advocacy and community groups, and research and policy institutions. The subject matter varies each semester, but is likely to include climate change mitigation and adaptation, offshore drilling and water protection, sustainable agriculture/aquaculture, ethics in the study of human exposure to environmental contaminants, and development of legal frameworks for emerging technologies such as carbon capture and sequestration and extraction of natural gas by hydraulic fracturing.
Please note: Some ELPC students work off-campus with government agencies and nonprofit organizations, while others work on campus at the Clinic on cutting-edge projects and case work. Students are carefully matched to their projects/placements by the Clinic Director.

Credits: ;3;4

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Environmental Science and Public Policy 11 - Sustainable Development (79625) 
Faculty of Arts and Sciences    Spring 2013-2014    
William C. Clark (Kennedy School) 

Description: Explores contemporary understandings and practical implications of the idea of sustainable development. Investigates the meanings and measures that different groups have given to "sustainable development;" scientific understanding of the complex social-environmental systems we seek to develop sustainably; and lessons on how societies have avoided the "tragedy of the commons" while instituting practical action that advances sustainable development effectively and equitably. Employs case studies in development to meet needs for energy, food, water and health.

Credits: Half course

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Environmental Science and Public Policy 90s - The Technology, Economics, and Public Policy of Renewable Energy (53953) 
Faculty of Arts and Sciences    Spring 2013-2014    
George Pierce Baker (Business School) 

Description: Energy is the lifeblood of economic activity, and there is little prospect of this changing. However, the planet's stores of easily accessed fossil fuels are limited, and the climatological cost of continuing to rely on fossil fuels is high. This course examines the long run and short run prospects for renewable energy. We start by understanding the technology of hydro, solar, wind, and biomass. We then examine the economics of these technologies, and how subsidies and taxes affect their viability. Special attention will be paid to the interaction of technology, economics, and public policy.
Credits: Half course

Prerequisite(s): Economics 10a.

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Great Power Competition in the International System (IGA-116) 
Harvard Kennedy School    Spring 2014    
Nicholas Burns 

Description: This course will focus on the future balance of power in the world and cooperation as well as competition among the Great Powers. We will study the rise of China, India and Brazil to global power in the decades ahead and assess whether these countries are prepared and willing to lead effectively. We will look closely at the changing nature of American power. In addition, we will focus on the relationship between the United States and China and their likely competition for strategic influence in the Asia-Pacific region. We will also investigate whether the Russian Federation and European Union will be more or less influential in the future. The major objective of the course is to reflect on how this group of countries and other regional powers can work together to address some of the principal challenges of the new century including the avoidance of conflict in the South and East China Seas, limiting nuclear proliferation, enhancing cooperation on energy, and dealing with the dilemma of intervention in wars in the Middle East and Africa.
Credits: 1.00

Location: HKS LITTR L230

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History of Science 231 - Transforming Technologies: Science, Technology, and Social Change (64715) 
Faculty of Arts and Sciences    Spring 2013-2014    
Naomi Oreskes 

Description: Climate change threatens severe dislocation of our environment, culture and infrastructure, as well as substantial losses to biodiversity and natural beauty. Virtually all experts agree that to avoid extensive disruptive climate change, we must transform our energy system from one based on burning carbon-based fuels to renewables or other energy sources that are net carbon-neutral. This will require a technological transformation. This course examines that challenge in light of past and present transforming technologies. In the first part of the class, we examine past examples of technological transformation, and consider what we might learn from them. In particular, we consider the questions: where do new technologies come from? What has been the role of the free market v. the role of conscious planning? Does technology drive social change or does social change drive technological innovation? Above all, how do we get the technologies we need? Do we get the technologies we need? In the second part we examine the required energy transition to prevent anthropogenic climate change, and the obstacles to it.

Credits: Half course

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Industrial Ecology: Concepts and Practice (ENVR E-158 (23880)) 
Harvard Extension School    Spring 2014    
Thomas P. Gloria PhD, Managing Director, Industrial Ecology Solutions 

Description: Industrial ecology is an interdisciplinary field focused on the sustainable combination of business, environment, and technology. It shifts industrial processes from linear (open loop) systems, in which resources and capital investments move through the system to become waste, to a closed loop system where wastes become inputs for new processes. Industrial ecology views industrial systems as being integral to ecological systems, not separate from them. The goals of the course are as follows: to define and describe industrial ecology; to demonstrate the relationships among production, consumption, sustainability, and industrial ecology; to show how industrial ecology serves as a framework for consideration of environmental and sustainability-related aspects of science and technology; and to introduce quantitative analytical methods and investigate their application to industrial ecology. The course provides an overview of theory, analytical methodology, and practical challenges in the field of industrial ecology. Emphasis is given to understanding how environmental assessment and improvements are carried out with support from systems analytical methods such as material flow analysis, risk analysis, life cycle analysis, energy analysis, cost benefit analysis, and eco-efficiency analysis. Prerequisite: ENVR E-151, or the equivalent.
Credits: 4

Location: 1 Story Street 302

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Physics 129 - Energy Science (42157) 
Faculty of Arts and Sciences    Spring 2013-2014    
Lene V. Hau 

Description: Non-fossil energy sources and energy storage are important for our future. We cover four main subjects to which students with a background in physics and physical chemistry could make paradigm changing contributions: photovoltaic cells, nuclear power, batteries, and photosynthesis. Fundamentals of electrodynamics, statistical/thermal physics, and quantum mechanics are taught as needed to give students an understanding of the topics covered.
Credits: Half course

Prerequisite(s): Physics 15a (or 16), 15b,c or 11a,b. Pre/co-requisite Physics 143a or Chemistry 160 or equivalent.

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Political Economy of Oil and Mining Resources in Developing Countries
IGA-414
Harvard Kennedy School
Fancisco Monaldi
Spring 2014 (show academic calendar)
MW 2:40 p.m. - 4:00 p.m. HKS LITTR L382
Credits
1.00 (show credit conversion for other schools)
Credit Level
Graduate
Description
This course evaluates the political and economic determinants of oil and mineral resource policies in developing countries and their impact on world markets, the interaction between states and extractive industries, the challenges of resource wealth management, and the causal links between resource abundance/dependency and development, institutions, and regime type. Questions to be discussed include: Why has resource nationalism been on the rise again? Why are there such high rents in oil and mineral extraction? Why is there such a significant variation in domestic pricing policies? What are the political and economic consequences of volatile resource prices? Is there a resource curse? Do mineral rents hinder democracy and development? What is the effect of mineral dependence on institutions? Which institutions can help to make mineral wealth a blessing? The first part of the course centers on the political economy of the oil and mineral industry, markets, and policies. The second part focuses on the consequences of resource dependence for development and democracy. Although the main focus is on oil, other mineral resources are also considered and compared to renewable natural resources.
Textbook Information
Currently no textbook information is available for this course. Please check back or visit the Harvard Coop.
Cross Registration
Eligible for cross-registration
With permission of instructor/subject to availability
Please login to create your cross registration course list.

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Science of the Physical Universe 24 - Introduction to Technology and Society(14726) 
Faculty of Arts and Sciences    Spring 2013-2014    
Venkatesh Narayanamurti (Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Physics) 

Description: From the digital revolution to bio informatics, from global warming to sustainability, and from national security to renewable energy, technology plays a critical role in shaping our lives. In this course, the students will be exposed to applied science and engineering concepts that span disciplines and examine broadly how technology shapes society and vice versa. It will emphasize both qualitative and quantitative analysis, modelling, and the importance of a conceptual understanding of science and technology in tackling the grand challenges facing global society.

Credits: Half course

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Science of the Physical Universe 24 - Introduction to Technology and Society(14726) 
Faculty of Arts and Sciences    Spring 2013-2014    
Venkatesh Narayanamurti (Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Physics) 

Description: From the digital revolution to bio informatics, from global warming to sustainability, and from national security to renewable energy, technology plays a critical role in shaping our lives. In this course, the students will be exposed to applied science and engineering concepts that span disciplines and examine broadly how technology shapes society and vice versa. It will emphasize both qualitative and quantitative analysis, modelling, and the importance of a conceptual understanding of science and technology in tackling the grand challenges facing global society.

Credits: Half course

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Science of the Physical Universe 25 - Energy: Perspectives, Problems and Prospects (1387) 
Faculty of Arts and Sciences    Spring 2013-2014    
Michael B. McElroy (Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences; Earth and Planetary Sciences) 

Description: The course provides an historical account of the evolution of the modern energy system, from early dependence on human and animal power, to the subsequent use of wind and water, to more recent reliance on fossil fuels - coal, oil and natural gas - and even more recently to the development of the ability to tap the energy contained in the nucleus. It will discuss the important historical advances in the applications of energy, notably in the production and distribution of electricity and in the transportation sector - where oil-derived products provide the motive force for cars, trucks, trains, ships and planes. It will highlight the energy related problems we confront today, with particular emphasis on air pollution, on the threat of global climate change, on the hazards of nuclear proliferation, and on the risks to national security imposed by our increasing reliance on imported sources of oil. It concludes with a discussion of options for a more sustainable energy future.
Credits: Half course

Prerequisite(s): Students are expected to have a background of high school algebra and trigonometry.

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Survey of Energy Technology (at SEAS) (SCI 0627700 – Section 00) 
Harvard Graduate School of Design    Spring 2014    
Michael Aziz 

TBD

Credits: 4.00

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Sustainable Buildings: Optimizing the Performance of Existing Buildings (ENVR E-119b (24010)) 
Harvard Extension School    Spring 2014    
Andrea Ruedy Trimble MS, Senior Manager, Harvard Green Building Services - Joel McKellar BA, Assistant Program Manager, Harvard Green Building Services, Harvard University 

Description: This is an advanced course with technical content that focuses on energy use reduction in buildings. Students are able to perform American Society of Heating, Refrigerator, and Air Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) Level II energy audits (including identifying energy conservation measures for various building types and performing advance life-cycle costing and greenhouse gas calculations); implement measurement and verification plans; and use basic energy simulation and modeling tools. Topics covered include ASHRAE Level II audits; identifying and calculating energy conservation measures; understanding and optimizing building automation systems; a basic understanding of reading code and graphics; advanced life cycle cost analysis; use of basic energy modeling software; use of daylight simulation/modeling tools; use of energy codes and standards; financial incentives; in-depth study of mechanical, electrical, and plumbing systems; and how advanced, high performance buildings work. Prerequisite: basic knowledge of building systems and how buildings work.

Credits: 4

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Sustainable Business and Technology (ENVR E-157 (23427)) 
Harvard Extension School    Spring 2014    
John D. Spengler PhD, Akira Yamaguchi Professor of Environmental Health and Human Habitation, Harvard School of Public Health - Matthew Gardner PhD, Director, Sustainserv, Inc - Ramon Sanchez ScD, Assistant Director of the Sustainability and Environmental Management Program, Harvard Extension School 

Description: With the increased awareness of the impact that business and economic activity have on our planet, we are seeing a boom in entrepreneurial activity premised on social responsibility, environmental friendliness, energy efficiency, and other sustainability-related attributes. This course seeks to examine the trends in green business, and to identify which activities are based on enduring principles and which are likely to be fleeting. Through conversations wtih local entrepreneurs, case studies, and lectures, this course provides students with an introduction to the principles of sustainable business, and the opportunity to look at a variety of new businesses, business models, and technologies that may play a role in an energy- and resource-constrained future.
Credits: 4

Location: Maxwell-Dworkin G115

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The Geopolitics of Energy (IGA-412) 
Harvard Kennedy School    Spring 2014    
Meghan O'Sullivan 

Description: The Geopolitics of Energy examines the intersection between international security, politics, and energy. The course begins with the recognition that energy has long been a major determinant of power in the international system and that every shift in global energy patterns has brought with it changes in international politics. IGA-412 explores how countries shape their grand strategies to meet their energy needs, as well as how such actions have implications for other countries and global politics. It looks at pressing contemporary issues related to peak oil, political reform and energy, pipeline politics, and the aggressive pursuit of oil and gas worldwide. The course also looks at new technologies and innovations - such as those making the extraction of shale gas economical or the growth of solar power - and how they are changing patterns of trades and could shape new alliances. Finally, IGA-412 considers the consequences of a successful shift away from petroleum based economies to anticipate how a new energy order will alter global politics in fundamental ways.
Credits: 1.00

Location: HKS LITTR L230

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The Media, Energy, and Environment:Global Policy and Politics (IGA-451M) 
Harvard Kennedy School    Spring 2014 Module 3    
Cristine Russell 

Description: The media play a unique role in shaping the public policy, politics, and understanding of crucial -- and often controversial -- energy, environment, and climate change issues in the United States and abroad. The media landscape is changing rapidly as mainstream news outlets struggle with fewer resources and less time. Meanwhile, the Internet provides a growing global megaphone for unsorted, confusing and often contradictory information and opinion on blogs and social media. This course will analyze the best and worst media coverage of recent energy and environmental controversies, including the Keystone XL pipeline; fracking; nuclear power in the post-Fukushima era; offshore oil drilling; renewable energy; climate change and extreme weather; climate change denial; and geoengineering. Students will examine how researchers, policy experts, and decision makers in the private and public sectors utilize both formal and informal media to communicate with the public and how this process can be improved. Practical communication/media strategies will be included.
Credits: 0.50

Location: HKS LITTR L332

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The Water-Energy Nexus (2628) 
Harvard Law School    Spring 2014    
Sharon Bogas Jacobs 

Description:
Water and energy are both resources vital to a vibrant society and economy, and there is a growing recognition that the two are mutually interdependent. This reading group will explore that interdependence, examining how laws and regulations account for the use of water in energy production and for the use of energy in the production and use of water. Topics are likely to include hydroelectric and hydrokinetic power, mineral extraction, biofuels, desalination technologies and bottled water. Our readings will draw on a variety of materials that must be part of the practicing lawyers toolkit, including case law, legislative and administrative materials, and secondary sources such as reports, scholarship, and news articles.
The reading group will meet for six two-hour sessions. Participation will be graded credit/fail. There are no prerequisites for the reading group other than a genuine interest in the subject matter, although students who have taken administrative, environmental or energy law will find the background helpful.

Credits: 1.00000000

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What is energy and how (else) might we think about it? (SCI 0643800 – Section 00) 
Harvard Graduate School of Design    Spring 2014    
Kiel Moe, Sanford Kwinter 

Description: 

Designers today require radically different intellectual frameworks within which to think energy, environment, and ecology. The need to rethink applies not only to the positivist and one-dimensional approaches that characterize common institutional initiatives, but to the widespread assumptions?often anachronistic or outright wrong?about what physics and biology actually teach us about environments. These assumptions are in turn widely embedded in many philosophical, theoretical, cultural and even moral propositions and have lead to an essential doldrums in thought and imagination regarding the role of energy and its relation to more general questions of form and formation.

Among the central episodes in knowledge that have remained inexplicably external to contemporary accounts of sustainability are the postwar developments in thermodynamics, particularly the revised understandings of equilibrium theory, control theory, and universal energy laws. The thermodynamic and cybernetic impetus of energy/ecological systems has not yet begun to impact design culture in any systematic way. The current century?s imperatives are already demanding significantly greater ambition and rigor than those inherited from the 20th century antecedents that tacitly constitute the basis, and limited horizon, of the contemporary shortfalls in speculative practice and theory about the role of energy in design.

This course seeks to provide a certain foundation and acquaintance with these broader and more powerful theories of the structure and dynamics of the ecosphere (the cybernetic/thermodynamic cosmos) with a view to providing in turn a new ethos of speculation within design practice and discourse that the customary bureaucratic and quantitative approaches do not encompass or address. This course is principally directed toward problems within the culture of design, directed towards alternate agendas for energetic, environmental and ecological thinking. The principles in this course are equally applicable to architectural, landscape, and urban practices. In addition to lectures by the resident instructors there will be a series of up to 8 sustained and substantial engagements with a series of visitors?emerging voices who have claimed a stake in the outcome of the field.

Credits: 4.00

Location: 42 Kirkland 1G

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API-905Y: Seminar on Environmental Economics and Policy
Semester: Year
Credit: 1.0
Syllabus: Click here for syllabus
Faculty: Robert StavinsMartin Weitzman

Description

This is an advanced research seminar on selected topics in environmental and resource economics. Emphasizes theoretical models, quantitative empirical analysis, and public policy applications. Includes presentations by invited outside speakers. Students prepare critiques of presented papers and prepare a research paper of their own. Prerequisites: This course is intended primarily for PhD students in economics, political economy and government, public policy, or related fields with interests in applications in the environmental and natural resource area. Prerequisites include a graduate-level course in microeconomic theory, such as Econ. 2010a, Econ 2020a, API-109, API-110, or permission of instructor.
Also offered by the Department of Economics as Ec 2690hf.

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IGA-408M: Learning from the Failure of Climate Policy
Semester: Spr Mod4
Credit: 0.5
Faculty: David Keith

Description

In the half-century since scientific knowledge of the carbon-climate problem emerged, we have made huge progress on managing environmental challenges from air and water pollution to DDT and stratospheric ozone depletion; yet, during that same period restrains on carbon emissions have been negligible. This course argues that the failure of climate policy is structural, so that a successful policy will entail reengineering the climate policy architecture. We will look back to emergence of climate with other environmental concerns in the 1960’s, and then critically examine assumptions that drove climate policy over recent decades comparing them with assumptions that drive other environmental policy regimes. The course will not defend a unified new approach to climate policy. Rather, it will encourage students to understand and critique new architectures and to develop their own.

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Earth and Planetary Sciences 134 - Global Warming Debates: The Reading Course(45399) 
Faculty of Arts and Sciences    Spring 2013-2014    
Peter John Huybers and Eli Tziperman 

Description: The atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration is now the highest it has been in at least 800,000 years, raising concerns regarding possible future climate changes. This seminar will survey the science of global change from the perspective of scientific debates within climate community. Specifically, the course will involve guided reading and discussion of papers that present contentious view points on the science of global change, with the goal of students learning how to scientifically evaluate these claims. Laboratories will provide students with hands on experience with some climate models and data.
Credits: Half course

Prerequisite(s): Applied Mathematics 21a or equivalent, or permission of instructor.

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Economics 1687 - Advanced Economics of the Environment, Natural Resources, and Climate Change (44432) 
Faculty of Arts and Sciences    Spring 2013-2014    
Martin L. Weitzman 

Description: Survey of foundations and applications of the modern theory of environmental and natural-resource economics. What are the basic models and what are they suggesting about policy? Externalities, public goods, common property, strategies for controlling pollution. Dynamics of renewable resources (fisheries, forestry) and dynamics of non-renewable resources (minerals like oil). Discounting, uncertainty, cost-benefit analysis, investment criteria for environmental projects, green accounting, sustainability. Basic economic analysis of climate change as prototype example.
Credits: Half course

Prerequisite(s): Economics 1010a1 or 1010a2.

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Global Climate Change: The Science, Social Impact, and Diplomacy of a World Environmental Crisis (ENVR E-130 (22039)) 
Harvard Extension School    Spring 2014    
Timothy C. Weiskel DPhil, Research Director, Cambridge Climate Research Associates - William R. Moomaw PhD, Professor of International Environmental Policy, Tufts University 

Description: This course introduces students to the science of climate change, drawing attention to the latest research and evolving pattern of scientific data on climate that has emerged in recent years. In addition, emphasis is given to analyzing the social changes and adaptations that human communities have already made and those they will most likely have to make as the Earth's climate continues to change in the coming years. Special attention is given to the diplomatic efforts that have been launched since the creation of the Framework Convention on Climate Change (FCCC) in 1992.
Credits: 4

Location: 1 Story Street 306

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Health & Global Environment (EH278-01) 
Harvard School of Public Health    Spring 2 2014    
Aaron Bernstein 

Description: Human activity has changed the atmosphere and altered terrestrial and marine ecosystems on a global scale for the first time in history. Evidence is mounting that these changes may already be having serious effects on human health, and there is growing concern that in coming decades the effects could be catastrophic. This course will examine in detail climate change and biodiversity loss as two primary examples of global environmental change and their human health dimensions. The challenges of addressing global environmental problems from a public policy and communications standpoint will also be explored. A multi-disciplinary faculty will provide an integrated assessment of these issues. The course will be open to all students at Harvard University, but preference will be given to students from HSPH, HMS, and KSG, as well as to Environmental Science Public Policy majors in the Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
Credits: 2.5

Location: Kresge G2

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History of Science 231 - Transforming Technologies: Science, Technology, and Social Change (64715) 
Faculty of Arts and Sciences    Spring 2013-2014    
Naomi Oreskes 

Description: Climate change threatens severe dislocation of our environment, culture and infrastructure, as well as substantial losses to biodiversity and natural beauty. Virtually all experts agree that to avoid extensive disruptive climate change, we must transform our energy system from one based on burning carbon-based fuels to renewables or other energy sources that are net carbon-neutral. This will require a technological transformation. This course examines that challenge in light of past and present transforming technologies. In the first part of the class, we examine past examples of technological transformation, and consider what we might learn from them. In particular, we consider the questions: where do new technologies come from? What has been the role of the free market v. the role of conscious planning? Does technology drive social change or does social change drive technological innovation? Above all, how do we get the technologies we need? Do we get the technologies we need? In the second part we examine the required energy transition to prevent anthropogenic climate change, and the obstacles to it.

Credits: Half course

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Introduction to Environmental Justice (ENVR E-145 (22548)) 
Harvard Extension School    Spring 2014    
Timothy C. Weiskel DPhil, Research Director, Cambridge Climate Research Associates - James S. Hoyte JD, Nonresident Fellow, W.E.B. Du Bois Institute for African and African American Research, Harvard University - Rhona Julien ScD, Environmental Health Scientist 

Description: This course examines the interplay of race, socioeconomic status, and interest group politics and the formulation and implementation of US federal and state environmental policies. Students consider the proposition that low income and minority populations, whether residing in urban or rural communities, bear a disproportionate burden of environmental pollution and its health consequences. Attention is given to the evidence and opinion that there exists within the United States, as well as globally, a pattern of environmental inequity, injustice, and racism. Further, we evaluate the contention that underlying this pattern is a historical failure of the mainstream environmental movement to provide for the needs of traditionally marginalized communities. Recent proposals to address the problems of environmental racism and injustice are discussed and analyzed.
Credits: 4

Location: 1 Story Street 304

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Learning from the Failure of Climate Policy (IGA-408M) 
Harvard Kennedy School    Spring 2014 Module 4    
David Keith 

Description: In the half-century since scientific knowledge of the carbon-climate problem emerged, we have made huge progress on managing environmental challenges from air and water pollution to DDT and stratospheric ozone depletion; yet, during that same period restrains on carbon emissions have been negligible. This course argues that the failure of climate policy is structural, so that a successful policy will entail reengineering the climate policy architecture. We will look back to emergence of climate with other environmental concerns in the 1960's, and then critically examine assumptions that drove climate policy over recent decades comparing them with assumptions that drive other environmental policy regimes. The course will not defend a unified new approach to climate policy. Rather, it will encourage students to understand and critique new architectures and to develop their own.
Credits: 0.50

Location: HKS LITTR L332

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Measure, Report, Reduce: Practical Methods for Greenhouse Gas Emissions Management (ENVR E-116 (23508)) 
Harvard Extension School    Spring 2014    
Richard Goode MBA, Senior Consulting Manager, Ernst Young 

Description: A new field of greenhouse gas emissions management has emerged, which specializes in helping institutions and corporations identify and mitigate their contributions to climate change. This course builds the skills needed to conduct a greenhouse gas inventory, and reviews the tools and strategies necessary to set and achieve a carbon reduction goal.
Credits: 4

Location: 1 Story Street 303

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Rethinking the Legal and Ethical Status of Humans, Animals, and the Environment(2545) 
Harvard Law School    Spring 2014    
Jeff Skopek 

Description:
Cutting across issues in bioethics, animal rights, and environmentalism, this course will explore the laws treatment of entities whose legal and ethical status is ambiguous or contested.
The first section of the course will be devoted to human entities, such as embryos, the brain dead, and future persons. With respect to future persons, for example, we will ask whether an activity can be considered harmful to a future person if it alters the persons genetics so much that it changes the persons identity; whether a law that prevents someone from coming into existence can be justified by reference to the best interests of that person; and if it can be justified, in what circumstances and on what grounds.
The second section of the course will be devoted to animal entities, such as primates, farm animals, and chimeras. With respect to primates, for example, we will ask whether animal protection statutes should be understood as granting rights to primates; how their status as property without legal standing to enforce these statutes shapes the answer to that question; and whether they should be granted standing or a functional alternative, such as equitable self-ownership.
The third section of the course will be devoted to environmental entities, such as the climate, forests, and endangered plant species. With respect to the climate, for example, we will ask whether cap and trade regimes create objectionable rights to impose harm by which they can be meaningfully distinguished from other regulatory regimes; how a cap and trade solution to the problem of global warming conceptualizes the harm of emissions; and what conception of the good of the environment underlies this conception of harm.
Across these categories, we will also explore a broader set of common questions and issues. For example, we will explore the relationship between legal and natural categories, as well as the nature of ethical and legal justification, asking whether rights and duties should be based on general categories (such as species membership), individual capacities (such as sentience or rationality), or a completely different type of criterion (such as the meaning of a form of treatment).
Grading will be based on class participation and reading responses.

Credits: 2.00000000

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Science of the Physical Universe 25 - Energy: Perspectives, Problems and Prospects (1387) 
Faculty of Arts and Sciences    Spring 2013-2014    
Michael B. McElroy (Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences; Earth and Planetary Sciences) 

Description: The course provides an historical account of the evolution of the modern energy system, from early dependence on human and animal power, to the subsequent use of wind and water, to more recent reliance on fossil fuels - coal, oil and natural gas - and even more recently to the development of the ability to tap the energy contained in the nucleus. It will discuss the important historical advances in the applications of energy, notably in the production and distribution of electricity and in the transportation sector - where oil-derived products provide the motive force for cars, trucks, trains, ships and planes. It will highlight the energy related problems we confront today, with particular emphasis on air pollution, on the threat of global climate change, on the hazards of nuclear proliferation, and on the risks to national security imposed by our increasing reliance on imported sources of oil. It concludes with a discussion of options for a more sustainable energy future.
Credits: Half course

Prerequisite(s): Students are expected to have a background of high school algebra and trigonometry.

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Harvard University
Fall 2013 courses


Catalyzing Change: Sustainability Leadership for the Twenty-First Century (ENVR E-117 (13543)) 
Harvard Extension School    Fall 2013
John D. Spengler PhD, Akira Yamaguchi Professor of Environmental Health and Human Habitation, Harvard School of Public Health
Leith Sharp, MEd, International Consultant 

We need an army of skilled change managers to navigate the complexity and urgency of our global environmental crisis. To inspire and enable people of all persuasions to engage in effective sustainability leadership, as part of an existing or new career path, this course enhances individual change agency skills as applied to a variety of organizational contexts (education, business, government, nonprofit, church, community). It explores what leadership for sustainability is, including the competencies, skills, knowledge, and strategies needed. The personal, organizational, and technical dimensions of effective change management are addressed. A variety of case studies and examples of sustainability in practice, including green building design, renewable energy, and environmental purchasing are explored. Harvard University is one of the primary case studies.

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Changing Natural and Built Coastal Environments (SCI 0633700 – Section 00) 
Harvard Graduate School of Design    Fall 2013    
Steven Apfelbaum, Katharine Parsons 

Description: 
This course will examine natural and anthropogenic processes affecting the coastal zone and nearshore environment. Ecological principles and their application to design and planning will be emphasized. Topics will include coastal wetland development, sediment movement in estuaries and long-shore, natural disturbance regimes including coastal storms, flooding, and erosion. Applications of ecological principles for landscape design, planning, restoration, recreation, management and conservation at regional scales will include stormwater management, hardened coastlines, sediment and toxics management, and marsh restoration. (Description continues.  Follow link above for complete description).

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Controlling Weapons Proliferation (IGA-232) 
Harvard Kennedy School    Fall 2013    
Matthew Bunn, Matthew Tobey 

Description: From Iran to North Korea, from terrorist groups seeking nuclear weapons to global black-market nuclear technology networks, the control of nuclear, chemical, and biological weapons is critical to global security. This course explores policies and institutions intended to prevent proliferation of these weapons and keep them out of terrorist hands, what can be done to strengthen these efforts, and what can be done to limit the risk when proliferation does occur. Primary focus is on nuclear weapons, but chemical and biological arms and ballistic missiles are also addressed. Students will gain an understanding of (a) the technologies of these weapons; (b) the wide range of policy tools available for preventing proliferation; (c) approaches to responding to proliferation when it does occur, including deterrence, military strikes, and defenses; and (d) how these issues interact with broader national and international policies. Policy choices relating to North Korea, Iran, nuclear terrorism, illicit nuclear technology transfers, the future of nuclear energy, and nuclear arms reductions are explored in depth. The course uses a risk-based framework, focused on identifying the greatest risks to international security from these weapons and the highest-leverage policies for reducing those risks.

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Daylighting (SCI 0647900 – Section 00) 
Harvard Graduate School of Design    Fall 2013 Module 1
Holly Samuelson 

Description:
Architecture is the masterly, correct and magnificent play of masses brought together in light. -Le Corbusier

Picture a space, one that feels vibrant, comfortable, warm, and healthy. Now visualize someplace cheerless, depressing, and dull. What changed in your mind's eye? Most likely, lighting --specifically natural lighting-- played a significant role. Yet, none of these terms explicitly relate to light or darkness. Behold the emotive power of daylighting. In addition to enlivening a space, daylight can connect us to nature, mark the passage of time, maintain circadian rhythms, and save energy. Conversely, it can lead to overheating, visual discomfort, and wasted energy.
This course explores the theme of daylighting in architecture. Because daylight design can be an unintuitive process, and because today's computerized tools offer designers a powerful tool for evaluating their ideas, this course includes a detailed focus on daylight simulation. Other topics include, design precedents, rules of thumb, and shading strategies, as well as the fundamentals of light, sun position, solar heat gain, and glare. Both studio-based and research-based students are encouraged to participate. (Description continues.  Follow link for complete description).

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Earth and Planetary Sciences 135. Physics and Chemistry: In the Context of Energy and Climate at the Global and Molecular Level
Catalog Number: 79597
James G. Anderson
For Undergraduates and Graduates

Description: A solution to the problems set by the intersection of global energy demand and climate feedbacks requires the teaching of physics and chemistry in that context. Core topics include thermodynamics, free energy, entropy, acid-base and oxidation-reduction reactions, electrochemistry, electromagnetic induction, circuit theory, AC and DC circuits, the nature of photons and of electromagnetic radiation, photochemistry, materials, catalysis, kinetics, molecular bonding, and biological processes for energy conversion and storage.
Note: EPS 135 is also offered as ES 135. Students may not take both EPS 135 and ES 135 for credit.
Prerequisites: Physical Sciences 1, or Physical Sciences 11, or permission of instructor.
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Earth and Planetary Sciences 239. The Consequences of Energy Systems
Catalog Number: 98708
Daniel P. Schrag
Primarily for Graduates

Description: This course provides an introduction to the physical and chemical impacts of energy choices on human society and natural ecosystems. Topics will include the carbon cycle, climate, air and water pollution, impacts of energy systems on health, land use consequences of energy technologies, and nuclear waste and proliferation.
Note: This course is a requirement for the Graduate Consortium on Energy and Environment.
Prerequisites: College level chemistry and physics and permission of instructor.
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Energy Policy: Technologies, Systems, and Markets (IGA-410) 
Harvard Kennedy School    Fall 2013
Henry Lee 

Description: Energy is a critical component of every dimension of human society. It is an essential input for economic development, transportation, and agriculture, and it shapes national and international policies in the environmental, national security, and technology arenas. IGA-410 is an introductory energy policy course which introduces students to the policy and economic dimensions of the energy choices to meet societal goals -- both global and domestic. Oil and gas markets, electricity policy,, technology innovation, renewable energy, energy efficiency , climate change and global energy politics will be covered. The first part of the course intoduces students to quantitative and qualitative analytical tools to assess energy problems and the fundamental concepts of energy policy. The second part relies heavily on case studies to explore specific challenges, which will allow students to apply the tools acquired in the first segment. Previous exposure to micro-economics is useful, but not required.

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Energy in Architecture (SCI 0612200 – Section 00) 
Harvard Graduate School of Design    Fall 2013 Module 2    
Kiel Moe 

Description: 
This lecture course introduces students to energy and environmental issues, particularly those that must be faced by the discipline of architecture. An overview of the basic principles of energy generation and energy use will be provided, and the fundamental climatic precursors and patterns will be discussed. Building design issues in relation to basic energy needs and interior environmental requirements will be briefly outlined, and students will be exposed to the underlying complexity of developing solutions that address a wide range of local and global concerns. In addition, the technological response to interior environmental control will be contextualized within the larger framework of the scientific and socio-cultural influences that shaped the building systems we currently use.

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The Energy Business and Geopolitics (1144 ) 
Harvard Business School - MBA Program    Fall 2013    
Prof. Noel Maurer 

The course will benefit students who intend to participate, as managers, capital providers, or consultants, in companies involved in supplying energy services to households, firms, and other customers. It will also benefit students who may work for firms in energy-intensive or energy-related industries, including transportation companies, vehicle manufacturers, and suppliers to producers of oil, gas, and electricity. More broadly, students interested in questions of international political economy and in the economics of strategic competition will benefit from the course.

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Energy Simulation in Design (SCI 0647000 – Section 00) 
Harvard Graduate School of Design    Fall 2013    
Holly Samuelson 

Description:
The best intent does not always lead to the best performing design, as intuition and rules of thumb sometimes fail to adequately inform decision making. Therefore, designers of high-performance architecture increasingly turn to analytical tools to eliminate some of the guesswork. This course explores the use of computerized energy simulation in pursuit of high-performance design.

The American Institute of Architects encourages designers to embrace energy simulation starting early in the project. In this course, students will learn to meet that challenge and strive beyond the "pretty graph" phase in a path towards producing meaningful and timely results that add value to the early-design process. Both studio-based and research-based students are encouraged to participate. (Description continues.  Follow link for complete description).

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Environmental Law and Policy Clinic (8008)
Harvard Law School    Fall 2013    
Wendy B. Jacobs 

Description:
The Emmett Environmental Law and Policy Clinic (ELPC) offers students an opportunity to do hands-on, meaningful, real-life, and real-time environmental regulatory, policy and advocacy work. Clinic offerings include local, national, and international projects covering the spectrum of environmental issues, under the leadership of Director and Clinical Professor Wendy Jacobs. Clinic students work on policy projects and white papers, regulatory and statutory drafting and comments, manuals and guidance to help non-lawyers identify and protect their rights, litigation and advocacy work, including developing case strategies, research and drafting briefs (filed in state and federal courts, including the U.S. Supreme Court), preparing witnesses and their testimony, meeting with clients and attending and presenting at administrative and court hearings. Our clients include state and municipal governments, non-governmental organizations, advocacy and community groups, and research and policy institutions. The subject matter varies each semester, but is likely to include climate change mitigation and adaptation, offshore drilling and water protection, sustainable agriculture/aquaculture, ethics in the study of human exposure to environmental contaminants, and development of legal frameworks for emerging technologies such as carbon capture and sequestration and extraction of natural gas by hydraulic fracturing.

Please note: Some ELPC students work off-campus with government agencies and nonprofit organizations, while others work on campus at the Clinic on cutting-edge projects and case work. Students are carefully matched to their projects/placements by the Clinic Director.

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Environmental Management I (ENVR E-101 (11925)) 
Harvard Extension School    Fall 2013    
John D. Spengler PhD, Akira Yamaguchi Professor of Environmental Health and Human Habitation, Harvard School of Public Health
George D. Buckley MS, Assistant Director of the Sustainability and Environmental Management Program, Harvard Extension School 

Description: This course surveys the scientific principles of environmental issues and environmental management practices, with attention to the health of both humans and the ecosystem. Fundamental and emerging topics related to air and water pollution, water use and management, aquatic ecosystems, energy and climate change, biodiversity, toxic substances in the environment, solid waste management, and regulatory strategies for risk assessment and environmental management are examined. A local aquatic field trip is planned on a weekend in the fall with alternatives provided for distance students. Other optional site visits are scheduled throughout the semester. Prerequisites: high school biology and chemistry.

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Environmental  Science and Public Policy 90a - [Energy, Technology, and the Environment] (2189) 
Faculty of Arts and Sciences    Fall 2013-2014    
Michael B. McElroy 

Description: The seminar will provide an account of the technologies that shape our world with a perspective on how they evolved, the benefits that ensued and the environmental challenges that arose as a consequence. Topics include prospects for renewable energy and options to minimize damage from conventional sources of energy. Specific attention is directed to challenges faced by large developing economies emphasizing the need for a cooperative approach to ensure an equable, environmentally sustainable, global future.

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Environmental Science and Public Policy 90n. China's Energy Economy: Perspectives from the Past: Challenges for the Future
Catalog Number: 8477
Michael B. McElroy and Xi Lu
Primarily for Undergraduates

Description: The seminar will provide a historical perspective on the development of the Chinese economy with emphasis on the energy sector, including analysis of related environmental problems. Energy options available for China's future will be discussed, including opportunities for clean-coal technology, nuclear, wind, hydro, and biofuels. The seminar will discuss tradeoffs implicit in these choices with respect to reconciling competing goals for environmental protection and economic development.
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Environmental Science and Public Policy 90w - European Environmental Challenges and Policies (19594) 
Eloi Laurent
Primarily for Undergraduates

Description: The seminar will explore current and future environmental challenges in Europe and related policies in the European Union (EU), starting with an introduction to the EU's institutions and environment. Specific challenges include climate change adaptation, mitigation (economic instruments and international negotiations), biodiversity and ecosystems preservation (economics of biodiversity) and energy. Specific policies include environmental justice (environmental inequalities), human development and environmental sustainability indicators ("beyond GDP"), decoupling (carbon intensity and resource productivity improvement) and green economy.
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Field Course: Innovation in Business, Energy, and Environment (6611)
Harvard Business School - MBA Program    Fall 2013    
Prof. Forest Reinhardt, Prof. Rebecca Henderson, Prof. Joseph Lassiter and Prof. John Macomber 

Overview
This course combines a classroom experience with an independent project to explore advanced and emerging topics in business, energy, and the environment. There is a focus on opportunities for organizations whose offerings are significantly involved in or impacted by energy, water, resource efficiency, transportation, and conservation. The classroom portion of the course is team taught in one section by the primary faculty of the Business and Environment Initiative. The projects are supervised by the course faculty and administered together so that there is a community of interest around the explorations.

A 1.5-credit version of this course, consisting of only the 14 early class sessions, is offered as Innovation in Business, Energy and Environment (course number 1165).

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*Freshman Seminar 21p. Materials, Energy, and Society
Catalog Number: 74031
Enrollment Note: There are no prerequisites.
David R. Clarke
Primarily for Undergraduates

Description: Advances in materials and energy technology have paced the development of Society from the Stone Age to the present. Today, we are facing an over-reliance on fossil fuels, a growing population, and its consequences on Global Warming. Starting with our current and anticipated future energy needs, this course, which includes substantial weekly laboratory content, explores the role of materials in evolving alternative energy technologies as well as their impact on worldwide resources.
Note: Open to Freshmen only.
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The Geopolitics of Energy (IGA-412) 
Harvard Kennedy School    Fall 2013    
Meghan O'Sullivan 

Description: The Geopolitics of Energy examines the intersection between international security, politics, and energy. The course begins with the recognition that energy has long been a major determinant of power in the international system and that every shift in global energy patterns has brought with it changes in international politics. IGA -412 explores how countries shape their grand strategies to meet their energy needs, as well as how such actions have implications for other countries and global politics. It looks at pressing contemporary issues related to peak oil, political reform and energy, pipeline politics, and the aggressive pursuit of oil and gas worldwide. The course also looks at new technologies and innovations - such as those making the extraction of shale gas economical or the growth of solar power - and how they are changing patterns of trades and could shape new alliances. Finally, IGA-412 considers the consequences of a successful shift away from petroleum based economies to anticipate how a new energy order will alter global politics in fundamental ways.

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High Performance Buildings and Systems Integration (SCI 0645000 – Section 00) 
Harvard Graduate School of Design    Fall 2013    
Ali Malkawi 

Description:
The interrelationships of environmental control systems as they relate to high performance/well integrated buildings will be explored in details. The course will address the main principles of such buildings and allow participants to develop their critical views about buildings? environmental performance. Projects such as residential, educational and commercial buildings will be analyzed. Systems? integration and innovations will also be studied. Other factors affecting high performance buildings such as energy standards and how they relate to current sustainability rating systems globally will be discussed. The relationship between energy conservation and the principles of initial building cost versus life cycle costs will also be presented. (Desciption continues.  Follow link for complete description).

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*History 2968. History and Economics: Proseminar
Catalog Number: 1557
Emma Rothschild
Primarily for Graduates

Description: Examines approaches to the history of economic thought and economic history by the exploration of particular topics, including the political economy of empire, energy, and information.
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Innovation in Business, Energy, and Environment (1165) 
Harvard Business School - MBA Program    Fall 2013    
Prof. Forest Reinhardt, Prof. Rebecca Henderson, Prof. Joseph Lassiter and Prof. John Macomber 

This course explores advanced and emerging topics in business, energy, and the environment. There is a focus on opportunities for firms whose offerings are significantly involved in or impacted by energy, water, resource efficiency, transportation, and conservation. The course is team taught in one section by the primary faculty of the Business and Environment Initiative.

A 3-credit version of this course is offered as Field Course: Innovation in Business, Energy and Environment (course number 6611), continuing in Q2.

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Introduction to Sustainable Buildings: Design and Construction (ENVR E-119 (12989)) 
Harvard Extension School    Fall 2013    
John D. Spengler PhD, Akira Yamaguchi Professor of Environmental Health and Human Habitation, Harvard School of Public Health - Andrea Ruedy Trimble MS, Senior Manager, Harvard Green Building Services - Agnes Vorbrodt MArch, ALM, Principal, VvS Architects Consultants 

Description: This is an introductory course that provides content focused on the design and construction of sustainable buildings. Students understand the overall sustainable design and construction process, including the use of the Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) rating system. Students are prepared to take the LEED for Green Associate exam for LEED GA accreditation after completing this class. Topics include an overview of green building design and construction process; the LEED-NC rating system; integrated design and setting goals (charette); financial incentives and making the case for green buildings; a high-level overview of how buildings work; key considerations and strategies by building type for site/landscape, water, and materials; energy reduction opportunities by building type, including passive design; human wellbeing; construction best practices; construction waste plans; indoor air quality plans during construction; measurement and verification plans; commissioning; and knowledge management.

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Resource Extraction Urbanism: Recasting the South American Productive Lansdscape (ADV 0910600 – Section 00) 
Harvard Graduate School of Design    Fall 2013    
Felipe Correa 

Description:As current development pressures continue to transform the hinterlands at an unprecedented rate, it has become more crucial than ever for the design disciplines to actively engage and conceptualize alternative futures for decentralized geographies and unbound territories. This faculty research seminar will utilize the Initiative for the Integration of Regional Infrastructure in South America (IIRSA) as a lens to investigate the potential role that trans-national mobility infrastructure can play as the backbone for a more integral mode of urbanization within South America's hinterland. (Description continues.  Follow link for complete description).

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Sustainable Manufacturing and Supply Chain Management Operations (ENVR E-137 (14010)) 
Harvard Extension School    Fall 2013    
Ramon Sanchez ScD, Assistant Director of the Sustainability and Environmental Management Program, Harvard Extension School 

Description:This course provides a set of tools and skills to identify, evaluate, and improve the sustainability of supply chain operations. It enables students to understand core concepts of industrial and commercial activities so that they are able to design sustainable manufacturing and service operations. Students learn to define green warehousing and distribution activities, plan retrofits and capital investments in current and future productive operations to save energy, select green materials for new products, manage efficient new product introductions by designing sustainable factory operations, and learn how to use continuous improvement techniques and value stream mapping to reduce waste and environmental impacts while reducing costs.

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Theories of Landscape as Urbanism, Landscape as Infrastructure: Paradigms, Practices, Prospects (DES 0324100 – Section 00) 
Harvard Graduate School of Design    Fall 2013    
Pierre Belanger 

Description:Responding to contemporary urban patterns, ecological pressures and decaying infrastructures, this course brings together a series of influential thinkers and researchers from the design commons across North America to discuss different methods, models and measures of large scale, long range design for the 21st century. Organized around a sequence of weekly topics and readings, guest presentations focus on the future of the region that, with the predominance of landscape ecology and the revival of geography worldwide, challenge the laissez-faire dogma of neo-liberalist economics, Fordist forms of civil engineering, and Euclidean planning policies that marked the past century. From Geddes to Gottmann, Mackaye to Mumford, Olmsted to Odum, the first part of the course re-examines a series of influential plans, projects, and practitioners to trace a cross-section through the history of urbanization in North America and the industrialized world to chart the trajectory of an emergent regional paradigm. Foregrounding the nascent reciprocity between ecology, economy and energy, the second part of the course opens a horizon on pressing issues facing cities today to recast the infrastructural and geopolitical role of landscape as operating system for future urbanism. Drawing from an array of contemporary projects and historic public works, the course concludes with student-led presentations of mapping projects that focus on transboundary watershed regions throughout the world; regions where, according to the United Nations, more than 60% of the world population will be living by the year 2030. Foreshadowing the preeminence of ecology in cities and infrastructures, the motive of the course is to construct a clear, multivalent discourse on the field of landscape as it becomes the locus of intellectual, ecological and economic change of significance, globally. (Description continues.  Follow link for full description)

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Transportation Planning and Development (SES 0530400 – Section 00) 
Harvard Graduate School of Design    Fall 2013    
Onesimo Flores Dewey 

Description: This is an introductory course that examines the complex relationship between transportation, land use and urban form, and the varied instruments available to planners seeking to influence this relationship. The course is divided into three parts: First, we take a historical look at how technological innovations, socio-demographic shifts and political decision-making shaped the way people and goods move around cities today. We explore the contemporary ?urban transportation problem,? that extends beyond satisfying mobility needs into addressing the impact of transportation choices on energy use, equity, congestion, air pollution, safety, urban sprawl, etc. Second, the course provides an overview of alternatives available to transportation planners, as they attempt to (a) avoid long and unnecessary motorized travel, (b) shift the movement of people to socially efficient modes such as walking, biking, and public transit, and (c) improve the technology and operational management of transportation services. In this section, we survey transportation innovations increasingly discussed in cities around the world, such as bus rapid transit, congestion charging, adaptive parking and bike-sharing. Third, the course looks at how transportation planners craft projects and policies that are both technically sound and politically feasible, introducing (and critiquing) some of the tools and skills used by professionals in this field. Through lectures, discussions, case studies and written assignments, this course aims to introduce students to the field of transportation planning, and to develop their ability to critically evaluate plans and policies. No prerequisites. 

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Transportation, the Environment, and Health (ENVR E-163 (14196)) 
Harvard Extension School    Fall 2013    
Anne Christine Lusk PhD, Research Scientist in Nutrition, Harvard School of Public Health - Mark Chase MA, Consultant, Nelson\Nygaard Consulting Associates 

Description:This generation inherited transportation systems that have an impact on climate change and cause a number of negative health effects. We want students to understand the existing transportation systems and the environmental and health impact of each. From this knowledge, students can choose to use environmentally sound and healthy transportation systems and help in overhauling and making transportation systems more sustainable and healthy for everyone. We explore the history of bicycles, mass transit, and vehicles. We calculate METs (metabolic equivalent of task, or human energy expenditure) of different forms of transportation. Topics of discussion include the negative health effects of mobile-source air pollution, transportation-related job creation, and car-versus-bicycle parking and their related costs and benefits. All forms of transportation are measured by travel time, convenience, noise, number of fatalities, runoff caused, heat island effect, quality of life, and wildlife migration. The expectation is that with more information and awareness, decisions about new transportation infrastructures can be based on factors other than the inherited considerations of job creation, level of service (moving vehicles quickly), and crumbling infrastructure.

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US Environmental Law and Sustainability (ENVR E-162 (13998)) 
Harvard Extension School    Fall 2013    
Rick Reibstein JD, Environmental Analyst and Manager of Outreach and Policy, Office of Technical Assistance and Technology, Massachusetts Executive Office of Energy and Environmental Affairs 

Description:This course provides an overview of the major environmental statutes and the common and constitutional laws that are relevant to environmental protection in the United States. Law is examined from the point of view of its effectiveness in developing healthy and sustainable human societies that also honor the inherent value of nature. Students examine how we can use law to develop a cleaner, safer, and more stable economy, and to protect natural beauty and the resources our descendants will need.

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The U.S. Homeland Security Enterprise (IGA-615) 
Harvard Kennedy School    Fall 2013    
Juliette Kayyem 

Description: Recently, homeland security has rested on four key activities -- prevention, protection, response, and recovery -- oriented principally against the threat of terrorism. As much as homeland security is about the U.S., a robust notion of homeland security must take account of our essential need to safely, securely, and intensively engage the rest of the world. Thus, homeland security describes the intersection of evolving threats and hazards with the traditional governmental and civic responsibilities of civil defense, emergency response, law enforcement, customs, border control, and immigration. While tremendous focus has been placed on terrorism, cyber and natural disasters, other interconnected threats and challenges characterize today's world - including illicit trafficking in narcotics, economic and financial instability, and the search for new energy supplies - that have tremendous impact on our notions of homeland security, and the Department that was created to address them. To provide students the tools necessary to conceptualize the challenges facing homeland security in a interconnected world, this course will examine what is commonly referred to as the "homeland security enterprise," defined as the broad scope of contributions from all federal agencies, levels of governments, businesses, and nongovernmental organizations, individuals, families, and communities, as well as international partnerships.

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Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Spring 2014 courses


A Philosophical History of Energy

Philosophic and historical approach to conceptions of energy through the 19th century. Relation of long standing scientific and philosophic problems in the field of energy to 21st-century debates. Topics include the development of thermodynamics and kinetic theories, the foundation of the scientific project, the classical view of energy, and the harnessing of nature. Authors include Bacon, Boltzmann, Carnot, Compte, Descartes, Gibbs, Plato, Aristotle, Leibniz, Kant, Hegel, Mill, Peirce, Whitehead, and Maxwell. Key texts and controversies form topics of weekly writing assignments and term papers. 
B. L. Trout, A. Schulman

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Alternate Energy Sources 
 
Explores a number of alternative energy sources such as geothermal energy (heat from the Earth's interior), wind, natural gas, and solar energy. Includes a field trip to visit sites where alternative energy is being harvested or generated. Content and focus of subject varies from year to year. 
F. D. Morgan

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D-Lab: Energy 

Provides a project-based approach that engages students in understanding and addressing the applications of alternative energy technology in developing countries. Focuses on compact, robust, low-cost systems for generating electrical power. Includes projects such as micro-hydro, solar, or wind turbine generators along with theoretical analysis, design, prototype construction, evaluation and implementation. Students will have the opportunity for an optional spring break site visit to identify and implement projects. Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments. Enrollment limited by lottery; must attend first class session. 
Staff
No textbook information available

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Energy Economics and Policy 

Theoretical and empirical perspectives on individual and industrial demand for energy, energy supply, energy markets, and public policies affecting energy markets. Discusses aspects of the oil, natural gas, electricity, and nuclear power sectors. Examines energy tax, price regulation, deregulation, energy efficiency and policies for controlling pollution and CO2 emissions. Students taking the graduate version complete additional assignments. Limited to 60. 
C. Knittel
No textbook information available

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Energy Policy for a Sustainable Future 

Focuses on a wide range of current energy and energy-related environmental policies that foster the development and mass deployment of sustainable energy technologies, fuels, and practices. Primary focus is US-based policies at the state, regional and federal level that impact the electricity, transportation and buildings and facilities sectors. Detailed case studies, diverse readings, and guest lectures by prominent policy makers and practitioners. Limited to 35. 
Staff

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Engineering, Economics and Regulation of the Electric Power Sector 

Provides an in-depth and interdisciplinary look at electric power systems, focusing on regulation as the link among engineering, economic, legal and environmental viewpoints. Explores a range of topics, such as generation mix and dispatch, demand response, optimal network flows, wholesale and retail electricity supply, renewable generation, risk allocation, reliability of service, tariff design, transmission policy, distributed generation, rural electrification, and environmental sustainability issues, all under both traditional and competitive regulatory frameworks. Background in policy, microeconomics, or engineering required. 
I. Perez-Arriaga, R. Schmalensee
Textbooks (Spring 2014)

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Global Climate Change: Economics, Science, and Policy (Undergrad) (Grad)

Introduces scientific, economic, and ecological issues underlying the threat of global climate change, and the institutions engaged in negotiating an international response. Develops an integrated approach to analysis of climate change processes, and assessment of proposed policy measures, drawing on research and model development within the MIT Joint Program on the Science and Policy of Global Change. Graduate students are expected to explore the topic in greater depth through reading and individual research. 
R. G. Prinn

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Mapping and Evaluating New Energy Technologies 
Project-based seminar covers recent developments in energy conversion and storage technologies. Merits of alternative technologies are debated based on their environmental performance and cost, and their potential improvement and scalability. Project teams develop quantitative models and interactive visualization tools to inform the future development of these technologies. Models may probe how the impact of a technology depends on assumptions about future advancements in materials or device design. Other projects may develop models for rational design choices (the selection of a particular material or processing technique) based on economic and environmental performance and physical constraints. 
J. Trancik
No textbook information available

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Politics of Energy and the Environment 
Focuses on the politics of making local, state, national and international decisions on energy and the environment. Topics include implementing energy efficiency measures, siting nuclear and alternative energy plants, promoting oil and gas development in wilderness, adapting to climate change, handling toxic waste, protecting endangered species, and conserving water. Case studies include Cape Wind, disputes over oil and gas exploration in the Arctic, the response to Hurricane Katrina, and efforts to craft and comply with the Kyoto Protocol. 
J. Layzer
Textbooks (Spring 2014)

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The Energy Crisis: Past and Present 

Explores how Americans have confronted energy challenges since the 1970s. Primary areas of concern include the supply of energy and the environmental consequences of its use. Examines topics such as nuclear power, environmentalism, oil shortages, global warming, alternative energies, and Middle East foreign policy. 
M. Jacobs
Textbooks (Spring 2014)

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Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Fall 2013 courses


The MIT Energy Initiative's list of Energ Classes can be found here.

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4.274 Design Innovation for Distributed Energy
______
Not offered academic year 2013-2014Graduate(Fall) H-Level Grad Credit
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units: 3-0-6
URL: http://architecture.mit.edu/architectural-design/course/design-innovation-distributed-energy
______
Explores design opportunities and technical challenges in the vertical integration of energy sector materials in designs for the built environment. Interdisciplinary design approach enables students to work directly with the selected energy harvesting materials to understand the performance attributes and their application value. Students investigate the spatial, social and environmental impacts of decentralized energy distribution through the development of design proposals and proof-of-concept application prototypes capable of providing measurable results. Engages research faculty outside of the School of Architecture and Planning. Limited to 20.
S. Kennedy


4.472 Design Workshop for a Sustainable Future
______
Undergrad(Fall) Can be repeated for credit
(Subject meets with 4.473)
Prereq: 4.111; 4.401, 4.411 or 4.42
Units: 3-0-6
Add to scheduleTBA.
______
No textbook information available


4.473 Design Workshop for a Sustainable Future
______
Graduate(Fall) H-Level Grad CreditCan be repeated for credit
(Subject meets with 4.472)
Prereq: 4.151; 4.461 or permission of instructor
Units: 3-0-6
Add to scheduleTBA.
______
Focuses on strengthening the link between design and technology with an emphasis on sustainability concepts. Introduces theories behind resource-efficient built environments and how they can enhance the design process. Students explore ways to effectively integrate building performance goals, such as energy-efficiency, efficient material use, structural stability and occupant comfort into the design process. Additional work required of those taking the graduate version. Limited to 16; preference to Course 4 majors and minors.
J. Ochsendorf
No textbook information available


12.021 Earth Science, Energy, and the Environment
______
Undergrad(Fall)
Prereq: Physics I (GIR), Calculus I (GIR), Chemistry (GIR)
Units: 3-1-8
Add to scheduleLecture: MWF1 (8-119) +final
______
Provides understanding of the Earth System most relevant to production of our planet's natural energy resources, including the physics, chemistry, and biology of conventional and alternative energy sources. Includes a broad overview of traditional and alternative energy sources: hydrocarbons (conventional and unconventional), nuclear, geothermal, hydroelectric, and wind and tides, along with their potentials and limitations. Develops detailed knowledge of the formation, concentration, and production of fossil and nuclear fuels, as well as the waste products associated with their consumption. An examination of conventional and alternative energy sources includes the environmental issues associated with the exploitation of these resources, both regional and global.
B. H. Hager
No textbook information available


11.168 Enabling Energy Efficiency: Practice and Innovation
______
Undergrad(Fall)
(Subject meets with 11.379J, 15.231J)
Prereq: None
Units: 4-0-8
Add to scheduleLecture: WF2-3.30 (9-354)
______
Explores the ways in which energy efficiency is enabled by innovations in technology, business models, and public initiatives, and its potential to create societal, economic and carbon benefits. Supported by guest interviews with government and industry efficiency leaders, students critically examine current practice methods and issues. Develops skills in areas such as building energy analysis, economic resource planning, energy information and behavioral analysis, and business/program strategy development and evaluation. Assignments challenge students to discover, analyze, and articulate strategic approaches to scaling transformative ideas. Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments. Limited to 25.
H. Michaels
No textbook information available


11.379J Enabling Energy Efficiency: Practice and Innovation
______
Graduate(Fall) H-Level Grad Credit
(Same subject as 15.231J)
(Subject meets with 11.168)
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units: 4-0-8
Add to scheduleLecture: WF2-3.30 (9-354)
______
Explores the ways in which energy efficiency is enabled by innovations in technology, business models, and public initiatives, and its potential to create societal, economic and carbon benefits. Supported by guest interviews with government and industry efficiency leaders, students critically examine current practice methods and issues. Develops skills in areas such as building energy analysis, economic resource planning, energy information and behavioral analysis, and business/program strategy development and evaluation. Assignments challenge students to discover, analyze, and articulate strategic approaches to scaling transformative ideas. Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments. Limited to 25.
H. Michaels
No textbook information available


11.165 Energy and Infrastructure Technologies
______
Undergrad(Fall) HASS Social Sciences( HASS Elective)
(Subject meets with 1.286J, 11.477J)
Prereq: 14.01 or permission of instructor
Units: 3-0-9
Add to scheduleLecture: MW11-12.30 (10-401)
______
Examines efforts in developing and advanced nations and regions to create, finance, and regulate infrastructure and energy technologies from a variety of methodological and disciplinary perspectives. Explores how an energy crisis can be an opportunity for making fundamental changes to improve collapsing infrastructure technologies. Introduces the challenges to modern society concerning energy and infrastructure technologies. Reviews the moral hazard aspects of infrastructure and the common arguments for withholding adequate support from new energy and infrastructure technologies. Seminar is conducted with intensive in-class discussions and debates. Students taking the graduate version complete additional assignments.
K. R. Polenske
No required or recommended textbooks


11.477J Energy and Infrastructure Technologies
______
Graduate(Fall) H-Level Grad Credit
(Same subject as 1.286J)
(Subject meets with 11.165)
Prereq: 14.01 or permission of instructor
Units: 3-0-9
Add to scheduleLecture: MW11-12.30 (10-401)
______
Examines efforts in developing and advanced nations and regions to create, finance, and regulate infrastructure from a variety of methodological and disciplinary perspectives. Explores how an energy crisis can be an opportunity for making fundamental changes to improve collapsing infrastructure networks. Introduces the challenges to modern society concerning energy security. Reviews the moral hazard aspects of infrastructure and the common arguments for withholding adequate support to the rebuilding of energy systems. Students taking the graduate version complete additional assignments.
K. R. Polenske
No required or recommended textbooks


15.031J Energy Decisions, Markets, and Policies
______
Undergrad(Fall) HASS Social Sciences( HASS Elective)
(Same subject as 11.161J, 14.43J, 17.397J, 21A.415J)
Prereq: 14.01 or permission of instructor
Units: 4-0-8
Add to scheduleLecture: MWF2.30-4 (E51-149)
______
Structured around choices and constraints regarding sources and uses of energy by households, firms, and governments, introduces managerial, economic, political, social and cultural frameworks for describing and explaining behavior at various levels of aggregation. Includes examples of cost-benefit, organizational and institutional analyses of energy generation, distribution, and consumption. Topics include the role of markets and prices; financial analysis of energy-related investments; institutional path dependence; economic and political determinants of government regulation and the impact of regulation on decisions; and other forms of government action and social norms regarding desired behavior and opportunities for businesses and consumers, including feedback into the political/regulatory system. Examples drawn from a wide range of countries and settings.
D. Lessard, R. Schmalensee, S. Silbey, C. Warshaw
No textbook information available


15.366 Energy Ventures
______
Graduate(Fall) H-Level Grad Credit
Prereq: 15.910; 15.390 or 15.371; 10.391 or 10.579
Units: 3-0-9
Sloan bidYou must pre-register and participate in Sloan's Course Bidding to take this subject.
Add to scheduleLecture: R EVE (5-8 PM) (32-124) Recitation: F10.30-12 (E40-160)
______
Project-based approach to innovation and venture creation in the energy sector. Explores how innovation and entrepreneurial concepts apply (or do not apply) to the significant opportunities in the industry. Working in teams, students create new ventures specifically for the energy sector. Lectures guide teams through key elements of their projects. Concurrent enrollment in 15.933 recommended.
W. Aulet, T. Hynes, F. O'Sullivan
No textbook information available


1.801J Environmental Law, Policy, and Economics: Pollution Prevention and Control
______
Undergrad(Fall) HASS Social Sciences( HASS Elective)
(Same subject as 11.021J, 17.393J)
(Subject meets with 1.811J, 11.630J, ESD.133J)
Prereq: None
Units: 3-0-9
Add to scheduleLecture: TR3.30-5 (E51-057) Recitation: TBA +final
______
Introduction to important issues in contemporary environmental law, policy, and economics. Discusses the roles and interactions of Congress, federal agencies, state governments, and the courts in dealing with environmental problems. Topics include common law, administrative law, environmental impact assessments required by the National Environmental Policy Act, and legislation and court decisions dealing with air pollution, water pollution, the control of hazardous waste, pollution and accident prevention, the production and use of toxic chemicals, community right-to-know, and environmental justice. Explores the role of science and economics in legal decisions, and economic incentives as an alternative or supplement to regulation. Analyzes pollution as an economic problem and a failure of markets. Introduction to basic legal skills: how to read and understand cases, regulation, and statutes; how to discover the current state of the law in a specific area; and how to take action toward resolution of environmental problems.Students taking the graduate version are expected to explore the subject in greater depth.
N. Ashford, C. Caldart
Textbooks (Fall 2013)


22.081J Introduction to Sustainable Energy
______
Undergrad(Fall)
(Same subject as 2.650J, 10.291J)
(Subject meets with 1.818J, 2.65J, 10.391J, 11.371J, 22.811J, ESD.166J)
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units: 3-1-8
Add to scheduleLecture: TR3-5 (32-155) Recitation: F11 (32-144) +final
______
Assessment of current and potential future energy systems. Covers resources, extraction, conversion, and end-use technologies, with emphasis on meeting 21st-century regional and global energy needs in a sustainable manner. Examines various renewable and conventional energy production technologies, energy end-use practices and alternatives, and consumption practices in different countries. Investigates their attributes within a quantitative analytical framework for evaluation of energy technology system proposals. Emphasizes analysis of energy propositions within an engineering, economic and social context. Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments. Limited to juniors and seniors.
M. W. Golay
Textbooks (Fall 2013)


15.933 Strategic Opportunities in Energy
______
Graduate(Fall) H-Level Grad Credit; first half of term
Prereq: 15.900 or permission of instructor
Units: 4-0-2
Sloan bidYou must pre-register and participate in Sloan's Course Bidding to take this subject.
Add to scheduleEnds Oct 18. Lecture: MW EVE (4-6 PM) (E62-223)
______
Introduces the energy system in terms of sources and uses, market characteristics, and key metrics. Provides frameworks for understanding the structure and dynamics of the sector and the drivers of the energy future. Opportunities resulting from demand growth, supply challenges, environmental constraints, security of supply, technology breakthroughs, and regulation are analyzed from the perspectives of both established players and entrepreneurs. Student teams engage in projects that evaluate a segment of the energy landscape and develop a strategic prospectus for a new business opportunity.
H. B. Weil, A. J. M. Meggs
No textbook information available


22.811J Sustainable Energy
______
Graduate(Fall) H-Level Grad Credit
(Same subject as 1.818J, 2.65J, 10.391J, 11.371J, ESD.166J)
(Subject meets with 2.650J, 10.291J, 22.081J)
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Units: 3-1-8
URL: http://web.mit.edu/10.391J/www/
Add to scheduleLecture: TR3-5 (32-155) Recitation: F11 (32-144)
______
Assessment of current and potential future energy systems. Covers resources, extraction, conversion, and end-use technologies, with emphasis on meeting 21st-century regional and global energy needs in a sustainable manner. Examines various energy technologies in each fuel cycle stage for fossil (oil, gas, synthetic), nuclear (fission and fusion) and renewable (solar, biomass, wind, hydro, and geothermal) energy types, along with storage, transmission, and conservation issues. Emphasizes analysis of energy propositions within an engineering, economic and social context. Students taking graduate version complete additional assignments.
M. W. Golay
Textbooks (Fall 2013)

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Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Spring 2014 courses


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Tufts University
Fall 2013 courses


DHP P250: ELEMENTS OF INTERNATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY

Tufts University, Fall 2013
William Moomaw
This course is designed to provide an introduction to international environmental policy development beginning with the scientific identification of the problem, the assessment of its economic and social impact, and the political forces that shape international agreements. Following a short introduction to some of the basic scientific and economic factors that characterize most environmental problems, the course examines five case studies that illustrate the range of international problems facing diplomats and corporations. Bilateral, multilateral and commons issues are studied using examples of air, climate, water, fisheries, and forests/biological diversity. 


DHP P253: SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT DIPLOMACY
Tufts University, Fall 2013
William Moomaw and Patrick Verkooijen.

The principle goal of the course is to acquaint students with a thorough understanding of sustainable Development Diplomacy (SDD) from both a governance and diplomacy viewpoint. By looking at foreign policy through a sustainability and development lens, students will learn of the complexity of the competing claims on natural resources and the role that global natural resources play in national and international security, business relations and trade policies. The governance and diplomacy lessons are drawn from a range of real-world natural resource policy responses, such as in the field of forests, water, food and climate change. 


DHP P254: Climate Change and Clean Energy Policy
Tufts, Fall 2013
Kelly Sims Gallagher
This course examines how governments can and might respond to the challenges and opportunities posed by the complex problem of global climate change. We begin with a study of the latest scientific understanding of the problem. Then, the technological options, the economic dimensions, the role of the private sector, and the domestic and international politics related to addressing climate change are explored. The policies of the major emitting countries are analyzed and compared. The international climate negotiations are analyzed. Policy tools are assessed against different criteria. The course will introduce and strengthen multidisciplinary policy analysis skills. 


DHP P257: CORPORATE MANAGEMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL ISSUES
Tufts, Fall 2013
Ann Rappaport

This objective of this course is to examine environmental issues from the point of view of large corporations. Topics include: strategy and organization; staffing for environment; health and safety; accountability for environmental performance; ethics; corporate environmental policies; pollution prevention; management tools; accident response; companies and non-governmental organizations; response to laws and regulations; international issues; environmental accounting; corporate social responsibility; and voluntary codes of conduct. Note: This course is cross-listed as CEE/UEP 265. 


EIB B284: PETROLEUM IN THE GLOBAL ECONOMY
Tufts, Fall 2013
Bruce Everett

This course covers the structure of the international petroleum industry and its role in the international economy. The first half will address the technical, commercial, legal, economic and political basis of the industry and the business models for key segments, including exploration and production, refining, marketing and natural gas. Drawing on this knowledge base, the second half will consider key issues of the petroleum industry, including the resource base, pricing, environmental impacts, alternative energy sources and geopolitics. Open to students who have basic Excel skills and have completed either E201, B200 or equivalent. 


EIB E246: ENVIRONMENTAL ECONOMICS
Tufts, Fall 2013
Shinsuke Tanaka

This course covers major issues in contemporary environmental economics. Includes analysis of environmental degradation and resource depletion, valuation of the environment, incentives to protect the environment, impacts of population growth and agricultural expansion, management of renewable and non-renewable resources, pollution analysis and policy; energy and global climate change; international trade and the environment; national and multinational environmental policies. Special attention will be paid to policies to respond to climate change, including carbon trading and “clean development” institutions. Open to students who have completed E201 or equivalent. 


ILO L223: INTERNATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL LAW
Tufts, Fall 2013
David Wirth

This course addresses the nature, content and structure of international environmental law. The course commences with an introduction to international environmental problems, together with basic principles of international law and environmental regulation. Specific topics include global warming, stratospheric ozone depletion, and exports of hazardous substances. Other topics may include marine pollution, transboundary pollution, trade and environment, and development and environment. The course evaluates the role of international and non-governmental organizations; the interrelationship between international legal process and domestic law; and the negotiation, conclusion, and implementation of international environmental agreements. 


Tufts University
Spring 2014 courses


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Address:
Consortium for Energy Policy Research
Mossavar-Rahmani Center for Business and Government
John F. Kennedy School of Government
Harvard University
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Cambridge, MA 02138

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Phone:
617.495.8693