Consortium for Energy Policy Research at Harvard

ENERGY POLICY COURSES OFFERED AT BOSTON-AREA UNIVERSITIES

Academic Year 2014-2015


Harvard University
Fall 2014 courses


carbonurbanism 
DES 0333800 – Section 00 
Harvard Graduate School of Design   

Chris Reed 
Fall 2014    
Description:
Carbon C is ubiquitous—it is one of the primary elements supporting life on earth, the fourth most abundant element in the universe, and it makes up 18.5% of the human body. Global economies have increasingly relied on carbon-based resources since the industrial revolution (fuel, plastics, paving, building materials, etc.), and its steady increase in release into the atmosphere is one of the major contributing factors to climate change. From the EPA: “Carbon dioxide is naturally present in the atmosphere as part of the Earth's carbon cycle (the natural circulation of carbon among the atmosphere, oceans, soil, plants, and animals). Human activities are altering the carbon cycle—both by adding more CO2 to the atmosphere and by influencing the ability of natural sinks, like forests, to remove CO2 from the atmosphere. While CO2 emissions come from a variety of natural sources, human-related emissions are responsible for the increase that has occurred in the atmosphere since the industrial revolution.”

Within the discussions on sustainability, energy neutrality, etc., few have probed the relevance of or development of a carbon-based framework for framing and informing individual projects or—more appropriately—the broader projects of urbanism. Our work in this research seminar will do just this:

· what are the implications of a carbon-based future?
· how do we define and measure such a thing?
· what are its implications for how we live? and for how our urban systems and networks are conceived and realized?

The work in the seminar will be very much research-oriented, student-project-based, and both analytical and projective. Initial seminar sessions will focus on broad-based topical approaches to urbanism, infrastructure, ecology, and landscape, and will be supplemented by workshops and tutorials on dynamic modeling software.

The primary thrust of the seminar will be student-generated research projects based around a topical interest, an in-depth study of the carbon- and infrastructure-based systems of particular representative places (Dallas, Miami, Barcelona, etc.), or the representation and digital modeling of those systems and dynamics. It is anticipated that some of the work may also be included on a new research website and/or public exhibitions that will be underway in the fall.

Students from MDesS, architecture, landscape architecture, and UPD are all encouraged to participate.

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Climate Engineering: Science, Technology, and Policy
Harvard Kennedy School (IGA-409) and MIT
David Keith, Steven Barrett
Fall 2014
Description: An introductory course bringing rigorous analysis to bear on the emerging global challenge of climate engineering. Important in its own right, geoengineering—the deliberate alteration of the earth’s climate—also provides a new lens with which to view climate science and policy. A gram of aerosol in the stratosphere can offset the warming effect of a ton of carbon dioxide, a factor of a million to one. This is roughly the same factor by which nuclear explosives overpower conventional bombs. Like nuclear weapons climate engineering technologies present an extraordinary governance challenge in a divided world. The course is jointly offered by the faculty at Harvard Kennedy School and MIT.  It introduces climate change, climate engineering, and climate policy assuming no prior knowledge of these topics. The course is intended for professional school students or graduate students. Confidence with mathematics and physical science at the freshman level is assumed. The course will have a substantial quantitative component, about two thirds of the content will be science and technology and one third will be public policy.

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Consulting in Teams for Sustainability Solutions 
ENVR E-599a (14533) 
Harvard Extension School   
William O'Brien MBA, JD, Visiting Lecturer, Graduate School of Management, Clark University 

Fall 2014    
Description:
The course imparts knowledge and skills for planning sustainability projects and
developing solutions for organizations including small businesses, nonprofits, or local townships. Sustainability solutions refer to a student team working with a client to develop and deliver a customized, actionable plan with the goals of reducing operating costs, minimizing the environmental footprint, and improving environmental sustainability. Typical areas of focus include energy efficiency, water conservation, waste reduction, supply chain management, green IT, transportation, and a process for organizational change. Opportunities are identified and initiatives developed in collaboration with the client for both the short term and long term. Deliverables include a sustainability action plan and a presentation to client stakeholders.

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Contemporary Issues in Oil and Gas Law: Fracking, Takings, Pipelines, and Regulation 
Harvard Law School   
Katherine E. Konschnik 
Fall 2014    
Description:
This Reading Group will explore hot legal issues in oil and gas law relating to public health, environmental quality, fair compensation for public natural resources, and eminent domain for public utilities. The goal of the Reading Group is to provide an overview of energy law and to demonstrate how this rich subject interacts with many other areas of law. We will also apply problem-solving skills in our discussions of often contentious topics, and think about how to represent clients in these settings or craft creative policy solutions and management strategies.
We will meet for six two-hour sessions. After a brief introduction to oil and gas activity in the United States, the group will tackle four legal topics - chemical disclosure, royalty transparency on public lands, methane emissions from the natural gas sector, and pipeline siting - in an informal, interactive setting. Students will be responsible for the readings, to ensure robust class discussions.

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Earth and Planetary Sciences 109. Earth Resources and the Environment
Faculty of Arts and Sciences Catalog Number 2218
For Undergraduates and Graduates
John H. Shaw
Fall Term
Description: An overview of the Earth's energy and material resources. Following introductions to hydrocarbons, nuclear fuels, and other economically important ores, the course emphasizes methods used to exploit these resources and the environmental impacts of these operations. Topics include: coal and acid rain; petroleum, photochemical smog, and oil spills; nuclear power and radioactive hazards; alternative energies; metals and mining. Labs emphasize methods for discovering and exploiting resources, as well as environmental remediation approaches.
Note: Given in alternate years. This course, when taken for a letter grade, meets the General Education requirement for Science of the Physical Universe.
Prerequisites: EPS 21, ES 6, or equivalent courses and permission of the instructor.

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Earth and Planetary Sciences 208. Physics of Climate
Faculty of Arts and Sciences Catalog Number 6561
Zhiming Kuang
Primarily for Graduates
Fall Term
Description: Overview of the basic features of the climate system (global energy balance, atmospheric general circulation, ocean circulation, and climate variability) and the underlying physical processes.
Prerequisites: Applied Mathematics 105 (may be taken concurrently), Physics 11a, b or 15; or permission of the instructor.

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Earth and Planetary Sciences 239. The Consequences of Energy Systems
Faculty of Arts and Sciences Catalog Number: 98708
Daniel P. Schrag
Primarily for Graduates
Fall Term
Description: This course provides an introduction to the physical and chemical impacts of energy choices on human society and natural ecosystems. Topics will include the carbon cycle, climate, air and water pollution, impacts of energy systems on health, land use consequences of energy technologies, and nuclear waste and proliferation.
Note: This course is a requirement for the Graduate Consortium on Energy and Environment.
Prerequisites: College level chemistry and physics and permission of instructor.

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Electricity Market Design
API-166
Harvard Kennedy School
William W. Hogan
Fall Term
Description: Topics in electricity market design starting from the foundations of coordination for competition.  Infrastructure investment, Resource Adequacy, Pricing Models, Cost Allocation, Energy Trading, Forward Hedging, Market Manipulation, Distribution Regulation, and Policy for Clean Energy Innovation.  Assumes some knowledge about the engineering, economics, and regulation of the power sector. Prerequisite: API-102, IGA-410 or equivalent.
Permission of the instructor required. Please note, for 2014-15, HUCE energy consortium students may take this course in lieu of API-164.

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Energy in Architecture
Graduate School of Design Course #: SCI-06122-00
Kiel Moe
Fall Term
Description: This lecture course introduces students to energy and environmental issues, particularly those that must be faced by the discipline of architecture. An overview of the basic principles of energy generation and energy use will be provided, and the fundamental climatic precursors and patterns will be discussed. Building design issues in relation to basic energy needs and interior environmental requirements will be briefly outlined, and students will be exposed to the underlying complexity of developing solutions that address a wide range of local and global concerns. In addition, the technological response to interior environmental control will be contextualized within the larger framework of the scientific and socio-cultural influences that shaped the building systems we currently use.

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Energy Policy: Technologies, Systems, and Markets
IGA-410
Harvard Kennedy School
Henry Lee
Fall Term
Description: Energy is a critical component of every dimension of human society. It is an essential input for economic development, transportation, and agriculture, and it shapes national and international policies in the environmental, national security, and technology arenas. IGA-410 is an introductory energy policy course which introduces students to the policy and economic dimensions of the energy choices to meet societal goals -- both global and domestic. Oil and gas markets, electricity policy, technology innovation, renewable energy, energy efficiency, climate change and global energy politics will be covered. The first part of the course introduces students to quantitative and qualitative analytical tools to assess energy problems and the fundamental concepts of energy policy. The second part relies heavily on case studies to explore specific challenges, which will allow students to apply the tools acquired in the first segment. Previous exposure to micro-economics is useful, but not required.
Please note, for 2014-15, HUCE energy consortium students may take this course in lieu of API-164.

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Energy within Environmental Constraints
FAS Engineering Sciences 137, catalog Number 19461
David Keith
For Undergraduates and Graduates
Fall Term
Description: This course provides a systematic introduction to the energy system for students in engineering and applied sciences. Students should gain a working understanding of the some of the most important energy technologies, from prime movers--gas turbines, steam cycles, and reciprocating engines--to secondary energies including fuel production and refining technologies and the electricity transmission and distribution system. The course aims at a systematic understanding of the energy system's environmental footprint as a tool to help students who will work to reduce it. Energy is a commodity. One cannot hope to re-shape the energy system to meet environmental constrains without a rough working understanding of energy markets--costs, prices and elasticities of supply and demand. So the course will integrate engineering economics and other applied social sciences into the treatment of energy technologies to enable a system's view of energy.
Prerequisites: Advanced high school mathematics, chemistry, and physics.

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Environmental Journalism 
JOUR E-162 (14540) 
Harvard Extension School   
Joy Horowitz MSL, Contributing Editor, Los Angeles Review of Books 

Fall 2014
Description: The aim of this course is to teach students how to produce newsworthy stories on environmental topics, ranging from climate change to toxins in the environment to sustainability. Part of the course focuses on the basics of environmental science and reporting in order to incorporate that knowledge into journalism. The goal is for students to understand the fundamental elements of an environmental story expert opinion, data analysis, real people, impact, and descriptive writing and interweave them into a finished product. We also focus on how freelance writers can successfully pitch environmental stories to editors, from op-eds to feature-length pieces. Students are introduced to the basics of environmental law, investigative environmental reporting, nature writing, climate change, energy and sustainability issues, communicating risk, toxicology, epidemiology, advocacy journalism, and dealing with spin. Also includes guest speakers from the worlds of environmental journalism and environmental science.

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Environmental Law and Policy Clinic (8008) 
Harvard Law School      
Wendy B Jacobs 

Fall 2014
Description: The Emmett Environmental Law and Policy Clinic (ELPC) offers students an opportunity to do hands-on, meaningful, real-life, and real-time environmental regulatory, policy and advocacy work. Clinic offerings include local, national, and international projects covering the spectrum of environmental issues, under the leadership of Director and Clinical Professor Wendy Jacobs. Clinic students work on policy projects and white papers, regulatory and statutory drafting and comments, manuals and guidance to help non-lawyers identify and protect their rights, litigation and advocacy work, including developing case strategies, research and drafting briefs (filed in state and federal courts, including the U.S. Supreme Court), preparing witnesses and their testimony, meeting with clients and attending and presenting at administrative and court hearings. Our clients include state and municipal governments, non-governmental organizations, advocacy and community groups, and research and policy institutions. The subject matter varies each semester, but is likely to include climate change mitigation and adaptation, offshore drilling and water protection, sustainable agriculture/aquaculture, ethics in the study of human exposure to environmental contaminants, and development of legal frameworks for emerging technologies such as carbon capture and sequestration, extraction of natural gas by hydraulic fracturing, and green infrastructure for management of stormwater.
Please note: Some ELPC students work off-campus with government agencies and nonprofit organizations, while others work on campus at the Clinic on cutting-edge projects and case work. Students are carefully matched to their projects/placements by the Clinic Director.

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Environmental Management I 
Harvard Extension School, ENVR E-101 (11925) 
John D. Spengler PhD, Akira Yamaguchi Professor of Environmental Health and Human Habitation, Harvard School of Public Health

Joseph Allen DSc, Assistant Professor of Exposure Assessment Science, Harvard School of Public Health
George D. Buckley MS, Assistant Director of the Sustainability and Environmental Management Program, Harvard Extension School
Fall 2014
Description: This course surveys the scientific principles of environmental issues and environmental management practices, with attention to the health of both humans and the ecosystem. Fundamental and emerging topics related to air and water pollution, water use and management, aquatic ecosystems, energy and climate change, biodiversity, toxic substances in the environment, solid waste management, and regulatory strategies for risk assessment and environmental management are examined. A local aquatic field trip is planned on a weekend in the fall with alternatives provided for distance students. Other optional site visits are scheduled throughout the semester.

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Great Power Competition in the International System
IGA-116 
Harvard Kennedy School   
Nicholas Burns 

Fall 2014
Description: This course will focus on the future balance of power in the world and cooperation as well as competition among the Great Powers. We will study the rise of China, India and Brazil to global power in the decades ahead and assess whether these countries are prepared and willing to lead effectively. We will look closely at the changing nature of American power. In addition, we will focus on the relationship between the United States and China and their likely competition for strategic influence in the Asia-Pacific region. We will also investigate whether the Russian Federation and European Union will be more or less influential in the future. The major objective of the course is to reflect on how this group of countries and other regional powers can work together to address some of the principal challenges of the new century including the avoidance of conflict in the South and East China Seas, limiting nuclear proliferation, enhancing cooperation on energy, and dealing with the dilemma of intervention in wars in the Middle East and Africa.

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High Performance Buildings and Systems Integration 
Harvard Graduate School of Design   (SCI 0645000 – Section 00) 
Ali Malkawi
Fall 2014
Description: The interrelationships of environmental control systems as they relate to high performance/well integrated buildings will be explored in details. The course will address the main principles of such buildings and allow participants to develop their critical views about buildings’ environmental performance. Projects such as residential, educational and commercial buildings will be analyzed. Systems integration and innovations will also be studied. Other factors affecting high performance buildings such as energy standards and how they relate to current sustainability rating systems globally will be discussed. The relationship between energy conservation and the principles of initial building cost versus life cycle costs will also be presented.

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Hybrid: Catalyzing Change Sustainability Leadership for the Twenty-First Century
Harvard Extension School, ENVR E-117 (13543) 
John D. Spengler PhD, Akira Yamaguchi Professor of Environmental Health and Human Habitation, Harvard School of Public Health; Leith Sharp MEd, Director, Executive Education for Sustainability Leadership, Center for Health and the Global Environment, Harvard School of Public Health 

Fall 2014
Description: We need an army of skilled change managers to navigate the complexity and urgency of our global environmental crisis. To inspire and enable people of all persuasions to engage in effective sustainability leadership, as part of an existing or new career path, this course enhances individual change agency skills as applied to a variety of organizational contexts (education, business, government, nonprofit, church, community). It explores what leadership for sustainability is, including the competencies, skills, knowledge, and strategies needed. The personal, organizational, and technical dimensions of effective change management are addressed. A variety of case studies and examples of sustainability in practice, including green building design, renewable energy, and environmental purchasing are explored. Harvard University is one of the primary case studies.

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Innovation in Business, Energy, and Environment 
Harvard Business School - MBA Program    (1164 – Section 00) 
Prof. Rebecca Henderson, Prof. Joseph Lassiter and Prof. John Macomber 

Fall 2014
Description: IB2E has two objectives. The first is to explore the tools of finance, strategy, and marketing as businesses decide how to respond to opportunities - and threats - in conventional energy, new energy, water, food, transit, and related areas. The second is to enhance technical knowledge as the foundation for assessing many of these topics. In addition, the impact on these businesses of regulations, incentives, public opinion, and disruptions to supply chains are explicitly considered.
Typical cases involve new methods and technologies like hydro fracturing, wafers, membranes and materials, or sensors and "big data," or the deployment of innovative business models including optimization, collaborative consumption, and the circular economy. Firms range from startups to very large multinational corporations to investment firms, and from the environmentally dedicated to the environmentally noncommittal. Many firms are not primarily in the energy, water, power, agriculture, or similar businesses but rather experience cost or revenue problems stemming from pressures on these resources. Several not for profit organizations are also studied.
The course takes more of a business strategy and entrepreneurship approach than a policy approach. The course does not look deeply at macro issues in energy and geopolitics, nor extensively at corporate social responsibility. Current events in business, energy, environment, and Cleantech are frequently incorporated into class discussions.

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International Environmental Governance, Policy, and Social Justice 
Harvard Extension School, ENVR E-147 (14553) 
Andrew Tirrell JD, Lecturer on Environmental Studies, Tufts University 

Fall 2014
Description: This course examines both the policy decisions and social justice issues that drive human actions and responses to environmental challenges. We begin by exploring three foundational topics: environmental governance, the global commons, and natural resource valuation. Core concepts from these sessions will continue to arise as we progress into classes focused on particular sectors of environmental policy, such as climate change, sustainable development, energy, and conservation. Upon completion of the course, students are prepared to engage with issues from a wide range of environmental policy areas that touch upon a number of social justice dilemmas, and have further developed analysis, rhetoric, written expression, and negotiation skills that are essential to environmental policy and advocacy careers.

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Introduction to China's Energy and Environmental Challenges 
Harvard Extension School, ENVR E-169 (14535) 
Xi Lu PhD, Lecturer on Environmental Science and Public Policy, Harvard University 
Fall 2014

Description: China is now the world's second largest economy, the world's largest consumer of coal, the second largest consumer of oil, and the world's largest emitter of CO2. Coal accounted for 69 percent of total primary energy in China in 2011 followed by petroleum (18 percent), hydropower (6 percent), and natural gas (4 percent) with minor contributions from nuclear, solar, and wind. Rapid economic growth over the past three decades in China relied heavily on coal, not pointing the way to a sustainable model for future development. According to the annual statistical report by British Petroleum (BP), if production of coal in China were to grow at an annual rate of 3.5 percent as projected by BP for the 2010-2020 time period, China could run out of domestic supplies of coal by as early as 2032. In addition, combustion of coal in China contributes to a variety of air pollutants (SO2, NOx, and particulates), posing serious risks for public health. Understanding China's energy and environmental challenges requires knowledge of the complex web relating public policy, economic growth, energy use, local air quality, and the global climate system. This course provides a cross-disciplinary perspective on the development of the Chinese economy with emphasis on the energy sector, including analysis of related environmental problems. Energy options available for China's future are discussed, including opportunities for clean-coal technology, nuclear, wind, solar, hydro, and biofuels. The course discusses trade-offs implicit in these choices with respect to reconciling competing goals for environmental protection and economic development. The overall objective of the course is to explore options for sustainable development for the Chinese society and economy through 2050.

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Land Use and Environmental Law 
Harvard Graduate School of Design, SES 0520600 – Section 00
Harvard Kennedy School, SUP-663
Jerold Kayden

Fall 2014
Description: As a scarce and necessary resource for earthly activity, land triggers competition and conflict over its possession, use, development, and preservation. For privately owned land, the market manages much of the competition through its familiar allocative price-setting features. At the same time, because use of land in one location affects the interests of neighbors and the general public and because market mechanisms alone do not always protect or advance such interests, government has enacted land use and environmental laws that significantly affect how land is handled. Expressed through local ordinances, higher-level legislation, constitutions, discretionary governmental decisions, administrative regulations, judicial opinions, and private agreements, these laws affect the look, feel, character, and composition of cities, suburbs, and rural areas everywhere.

This course introduces students to the content and controversies of land use and environmental laws. No prior legal knowledge is presumed. The purpose of the course is to provide students with a basic understanding of the theories, rationales, techniques, and implementing institutions involved in legally controlling the possession, use, development, and preservation of land. Particular attention is paid to law’s intended and unintended impacts on the physical pattern of built environments and resulting social and economic outcomes, on the increasing overlap of land use law and environmental law regimes especially when climate change and urban resilience are front and center, and on the tensions between individual rights and asserted socio-economic goals often resolved within the context of constitutional law by the courts. Law’s approach is distinguished from those employed by other fields and disciplines. The role of the non-lawyer professional (planner, designer, public policymaker, developer, activist, etc.) in the crafting and implementation of land use and environmental laws is highlighted. Although United States law provides the principal material for the course, comparisons with legal regimes in other countries are regularly made. For better and worse, United States law has been a key reference point for planning and environmental laws worldwide.

The legal techniques explored in the course include laws dealing with zoning, subdivisions, growth management, transfer of development rights, exactions and impact fees, form-based codes, environmental impact reviews, wetlands and water, endangered species, clean air, solid and hazardous waste disposal, design review, environmental justice, climate change, historic preservation, energy siting, billboard/sign/cell tower controls, eminent domain, building codes, and private homeowner associations. Course readings are drawn from primary sources, including local ordinances, higher level legislation, constitutions, judicial opinions, and private agreements, and from secondary sources, including law review and journal articles, book excerpts, and professional reports. Assignments include a five-page paper and a final exam.

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RURBAN: Resilient Practices and Networks in the Contemporary City 
Harvard Graduate School of Design, STU 0150100 – Section 00 
Doina Petrescu, Constantin Petcu

Fall 2014
Description: The studio addresses the recent calls for collective urban action to confront challenges such as global warming, depletion of fossil fuels and natural resources, economic recession, population growth, social and ecological justice etc. While governments and institutions seem to be taking too long to reach agreement and act, many initiatives have started at the local level.

“Resilience” is a key term in the context of the current economic crisis and resource scarcity. In contrast to sustainability, which focuses on maintaining the status quo of a system by controlling the balance between its inputs and outputs, without necessarily addressing the factors of change and disequilibrium, resilience addresses how systems can adapt and thrive in changing circumstances

We need to become resilient: to adapt to change without collapsing and without changing our structural values. A city can’t become resilient without the involvement of its inhabitants.

How can we, as designers, support such involvement? What new roles should we play? What tools and means can be used at times of crisis and scarcity? How do we reactivate and sustain cultures of collaboration and sharing? How can progressive practices be initiated while acting locally and at a small scale?

The studio will research on bottom-up frameworks for resilient urban regeneration, based on the setting up of local ecological cycles that activate material (e.g., water, energy, waste, and food) and immaterial (e.g., local skill, socioeconomic, cultural, and self-building) flows between key fields of activity that exist already or could be implemented within the existing fabric of the city.

One of studio’s main references is the existing R-urban project initiated by AAA and partners in Paris and London (r-urban.net). This project will be critically analyzed and knowledge will be transferred in other contexts explored in the studio.

The studio will be located in New York. Students will design urban systems and agencies to build resilience capacity at different scales and across key fields of urban activity such as economy, habitat, transport, urban agriculture, culture. Each student can choose to focus on a specific scale and activity.

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Science of the Physical Universe 29. The Climate-Energy Challenge
FAS Catalog Number: 79392; Primarily for Undergraduates
Daniel P. Schrag (Earth and Planetary Sciences)
Fall Term
Description: This course will examine future climate change in the context of Earth history, and then consider various strategies for what might be done to deal with it. The likely impacts of continued greenhouse gas emissions will be explored, emphasizing the scientific uncertainties associated with various predictions, and how this can be understood in the context of risk. In the latter third of the class, the question of how to mitigate climate change will be discussed, including an examination of various options for advanced energy systems.

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Sustainability and International Business 
Harvard Extension School, MGMT E-5625 (14484) 
Maurie Kelly PhD, Director of Informatics, Institutes of Energy and the Environment, and Instructor of Risk Management, Smeal College of Business, Pennsylvania State University 

Fall 2014
Description: Sustainability in international business is more than simply adopting sustainable practices it has the potential to help companies gain competitive advantage. This course examines the global business environment in the context of sustainability and explores the challenges and opportunities that the new movement toward sustainability offers multinational enterprises and the countries in which they do business. It focuses on the meaning of sustainable development for profit-making global corporations, the effect of sustainability on global corporate development strategies, and how corporations and industries interact with nations to develop relationships and partnerships that support sustainable economic development. We investigate regions of the world such as Africa, Europe particularly Scandinavia Asia, and Latin America to learn about how multinationals are approaching sustainability in these regions. We also look at companies such as Unilever, Goodyear, SAB, Hitachi, Chevron, Coca Cola, and GlaxoSmithKline and study their specific approaches to sustainability. Topics covered in this course include corporate social and environmental responsibility; risk management; governments, investors, and stakeholder expectations; the social and environmental footprint throughout the business value chain; and impacts and opportunities for multinationals in the age of climate change.

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Sustainable Manufacturing and Supply Chain Management Operations 
Harvard Extension School, ENVR E-137 (14010)
Ramon Sanchez ScD, Assistant Director of the Sustainability and Environmental Management Program, Harvard Extension School 

Fall 2014
Description: This course provides a set of tools and skills to identify, evaluate, and improve the sustainability of supply chain operations. It enables students to understand core concepts of industrial and commercial activities so that they are able to design sustainable manufacturing and service operations. Students learn to define green warehousing and distribution activities, plan retrofits and capital investments in current and future productive operations to save energy, select green materials for new products, manage efficient new product introductions by designing sustainable factory operations, and learn how to use continuous improvement techniques and value stream mapping to reduce waste and environmental impacts while reducing costs.

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Sustainable Product Design and the Innovation Ecosystem 
Harvard Extension School, ENVR E-154 (14518)
Ramon Sanchez ScD, Assistant Director of the Sustainability and Environmental Management Program, Harvard Extension School

Fall 2014
Description: This course is for anyone who would like to learn how to design and launch a new product with the lowest environmental footprint. Students acquire many tools and skills in the course: how to do market intelligence (technological benchmarking and reverse engineering), how to incorporate real sustainability into new products (and identify green washing), how to use structured tools to enhance creativity and innovation to conceive and develop new products, how to design and implement a new product introduction process, how to do and implement the design of experiments to select the most robust features for products, how to write and submit a patent application to decrease legal costs, how to protect copyrights and trademarks, how to fund intellectual property by using funds from business incubators and accelerators, how to select the right materials and processes to minimize the product's environmental impacts (using green chemistry principles, sustainable sourcing of components, and sustainable certification for raw materials to promote conservation), how to reduce energy use by new products, how to build and test prototypes in an inexpensive way, and how to reduce the environmental impacts of packaging and transportation. Students also learn the basic components of an innovation ecosystem and how high technology hubs (Silicon Valley, Boston, New York) work.

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Transportation Planning and Development 
Harvard Graduate School of Design, SES 0530400 – Section 00 
Harvard Kennedy School, SUP-652
Onesimo Flores Dewey

Fall 2014
Description: This is an introductory course that examines the complex relationship between transportation, land use and urban form, and the varied instruments available to planners seeking to influence this relationship. The course is divided into three parts: First, we take a historical look at how technological innovations, socio-demographic shifts and political decision-making shaped the way people and goods move around cities today. We explore the contemporary ?urban transportation problem,? that extends beyond satisfying mobility needs into addressing the impact of transportation choices on energy use, equity, congestion, air pollution, safety, urban sprawl, etc. Second, the course provides an overview of alternatives available to transportation planners, as they attempt to (a) avoid long and unnecessary motorized travel, (b) shift the movement of people to socially efficient modes such as walking, biking, and public transit, and (c) improve the technology and operational management of transportation services. In this section, we survey transportation innovations increasingly discussed in cities around the world, such as bus rapid transit, congestion charging, adaptive parking and bike-sharing. Third, the course looks at how transportation planners craft projects and policies that are both technically sound and politically feasible, introducing (and critiquing) some of the tools and skills used by professionals in this field. Through lectures, discussions, case studies and written assignments, this course aims to introduce students to the field of transportation planning, and to develop their ability to critically evaluate plans and policies. No prerequisites. 

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US Environmental Law and Sustainability 
Harvard Extension School, ENVR E-162 (13998) 
Rick Reibstein JD, Environmental Analyst and Manager of Outreach and Policy, Office of Technical Assistance and Technology, Massachusetts Executive Office of Energy and Environmental Affairs 

Fall 2014
Description: This course provides an overview of the major environmental statutes and the common and constitutional laws that are relevant to environmental protection in the United States. Law is examined from the point of view of its effectiveness in developing healthy and sustainable human societies that also honor the inherent value of nature. Students examine how we can use law to develop a cleaner, safer, and more stable economy, and to protect natural beauty and the resources our descendants will need.

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Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Fall 2014 courses


The MIT Energy Initiative's list of Energy Classes can be found here.


Tufts University
Fall 2014 courses


Coming soon.

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Address:
Consortium for Energy Policy Research
Mossavar-Rahmani Center for Business and Government
John F. Kennedy School of Government
Harvard University
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Belfer 312
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