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PEOPLE: FACULTY FELLOWS (Members of HEEP Faculty Steering Committee in italics)

Joseph Aldy
Harvard Kennedy School
Joe Aldy is an Assistant Professor of Public Policy at the Harvard Kennedy School.  His research focuses on climate change policy, energy policy, and mortality risk valuation.  Before coming to HKS, he served as the Special Assistant to the President for Energy and Environment, reporting through both the National Economic Council and the Office of Energy and Climate Change.  Aldy was a Fellow at Resources for the Future from 2005 to 2009 and served on the staff of the President’s Council of Economic Advisers from 1997 to 2000.  He also served as the Co-Director of the Harvard Project on International Climate Agreements, Co-Director of the International Energy Workshop, and Treasurer for the Association of Environmental and Resource Economists before joining the Obama Administration.  He holds a PhD in economics from Harvard University, a Master of Environmental Management degree from the Nicholas School of the Environment, and a BA from Duke University.

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David Bloom
Harvard School of Public Health
David Bloom is the Clarence James Gamble Professor of Economics and Demography at the Harvard School of Public Health. Professor Bloom has published over 80 articles and books in the fields of economics and demography. He has been honored with a number of distinctions including an Alfred P. Sloan Research Fellowship and the Galbraith Award for quality teaching in economics. Professor Bloom's current research interests include labor economics, health, demography, and the environment. He has written extensively on the link between health status and economic growth; the consequences of population change on economic development; the emerging world labor market; the effects of rapid population growth; the economics of municipal solid waste; and the global spread and economic impacts of HIV and AIDS.

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Richard Cooper
Department of Economics
Richard Cooper is the Maurits C. Boas Professor of International Economics in the Department of Economics. Professor Cooper’s primary research interests are in international economics, including both international trade and international monetary economics. His fundamental interest in the world economy leads to an interest in all environmental issues that require international cooperation to deal with effectively. His main focus in this regard is public policy toward global climate change as reflected in his recent working paper International Approaches to Global Climate Change. Professor Cooper teaches a new freshman seminar titled “Public Policy Approaches to Global Climate Change.”

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Melissa Dell
Department of Economics
Melissa Dell is an Assistant Professor in the Economics Department and a faculty research fellow at the National Bureau of Economic Research. Her research focuses on long-run economic development, primarily in Latin America and Asia. She has examined the impacts of weather on economic growth and is currently conducting research about the long-run effects of agrarian reform and agricultural technology investments in Mexico and East Asia. She received a PhD in Economics from MIT, a masters degree in Economics from Oxford, and a BA from Harvard College.

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David Drake
Harvard Business School
David Drake is an Assistant Professor of Business Administration. His research focuses on sustainable operations—in particular, on how emissions regulation can impact the capacity portfolios in which firms invest; how such regulation, when unilaterally imposed, impacts technology choice, facility location, and regional competitiveness; and how creative collaboration can improve the economic feasibility of clean technologies among logistics providers. Professor Drake has also authored pedagogical cases focusing on technology choice under emissions regulation and closed-loop supply chains. Through his research, Professor Drake has worked closely with a number of firms regulated under the European Union Emissions Trading System, and attended the Copenhagen Climate Change Conference (UNFCCC COP-15) as a delegate. Earlier, Professor Drake spent five years at Random House, where he led publishing operations projects and production purchasing groups.

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Jeffrey Frankel
Harvard Kennedy School
Jeffrey Frankel is the James W. Harpel Professor of Capital Formation and Growth at the Harvard Kennedy School. President Clinton appointed him to the Council of Economic Advisers in 1996. His responsibilities as Member included international economics, macroeconomics, and the environment. He left the Council in March 1999. He directs the National Bureau of Economic Research program in International Finance and Macroeconomics. Professor Frankel’s primary research interests are in the field of international economics. The two aspects of environmental economics in which he is most interested are the Kyoto protocols on global climate change, and the relationship between international trade and the environment.

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Edward Glaeser
Department of Economics and Harvard Kennedy School
Edward Glaeser is the Fred and Eleanor Glimp Professor of Economics in the Faculty of Arts and Sciences at Harvard University, where he has taught since 1992. He is Director of the Taubman Center for State and Local Government and Director of the Rappaport Institute of Greater Boston. He teaches urban and social economics and microeconomic theory. He has published dozens of papers on cities, economic growth, and law and economics. In particular, his work has focused on the determinants of city growth and the role of cities as centers of idea transmission. He also edits the Quarterly Journal of Economics. He received his Ph.D. from the University of Chicago in 1992.

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Jerry Green
Faculty of Arts and Sciences and Harvard Business School
Jerry Green is the John Leverett Professor in the University and the David A. Wells Professor of Political Economy in the Department of Economics. He joined the Harvard faculty in 1970, chaired the Economics Department from 1984 to 1987, and served as Provost of the University from 1992 to 1994. Professor Green is a fellow of the Econometric Society and served on its council from 1988 to 1994. He is a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and a Guggenheim Fellow. In 1980, he received the J.K. Galbraith Prize for excellence in teaching. Professor Green is known for his work on the theories of incentives, rational expectations, and behavior under uncertainty. He has contributed to a number of areas in applied economics, including tax policy, finance, health economics, higher education, and patent policy.

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James Hammitt
Harvard School of Public Health
James Hammitt is Professor of Economics and Decision Sciences in the Harvard School of Public Health. Professor Hammitt's research concerns the development and application of quantitative methods—such as benefit-cost, decision, and risk analysis, game theory, and mathematical modeling—to health and environmental policy. Current topics include the management of long-term environmental issues with important scientific uncertainties, such as global climate change and stratospheric-ozone depletion, the evaluation of ancillary benefits and countervailing risks associated with risk-control measures, and the characterization of social preferences over health and environmental risks using revealed-preference and contingent-valuation methods.

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Rema Hanna
Harvard Kennedy School
Rema Hanna is an Associate Professor of Public Policy and Economics. She has a Ph.D. in Economics from MIT and a BS in Policy Analysis from Cornell. She was previously an Assistant Professor at the Robert F. Wagner Graduate School of Public Service, New York University. Professor Hanna studies the impact of public policy on economic development. Recent work includes a study quantifying the foreign direct investment effects of U.S. environmental regulation, and various randomized experiments in India designed to study the impacts of education policy, corruption, and indoor air pollution..

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Rebecca Henderson
Harvard Business School
Rebecca Henderson has been the Senator John Heinz Professor of Environmental Management at the Harvard Business School since the summer of 2009, and has been a research associate at the National Bureau of Economic Research since 1995. From 1988-2008 she was a Professor at MIT’s Sloan School, where she specialized in problems in the economics of innovation, organizational change, and the strategic issues facing large organizations attempting to take advantage of significant innovation. Her current work focuses on the economics of innovation in energy and on the organizational and strategic challenges inherent in the efforts of private firms to respond to climate change.

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William Hogan
Harvard Kennedy School
William Hogan is the Raymond Plank Professor of Global Energy Policy. Professor Hogan is research director of the Harvard Electricity Policy Group, which is exploring the issues involved in the transition to a more competitive electricity market. He serves as director of Graduate Studies for the Ph.D. in Public Policy and the Ph.D. in Political Economy and Government at the Harvard Kennedy School. He has also served as chair of the Public Policy Program and as director of the Energy and Environmental Policy Center. He is a director of LECG, LLC. Professor Hogan is involved in many research and consulting activities including major energy industry restructuring, network pricing and access issues, and privatization in several countries.

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Richard Hornbeck
Department of Economics
Richard Hornbeck is a Dunwalke Associate Professor of American History in the Department of Economics at Harvard University.  His research and teaching focus on economic history and development.  Research topics include the 1930s American Dust Bowl and long-run adjustment to environmental change; the 1880s introduction of barbed wire fencing and the effects of property rights on agricultural development; and agglomeration spillovers generated by large manufacturing plant openings in the 1980s.  Richard received his PhD in economics from MIT in 2009, and a BA in economics from the University of Chicago in 2004.

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Dale Jorgenson
Department of Economics
Dale W. Jorgenson is the Samuel W. Morris University Professor. He has been a professor at Harvard since 1969. He was appointed in the department of economics until 2002 when he received an appointment as a University Professor entitling him to teach across disciplinary and school boundaries. Professor Jorgenson has been the director of the Program on Technology and Economic Policy at the Center for Business and Government since 1984. He served as chairman of the Department of Economics from 1994 to 1997. Jorgenson received his Ph.D. degree in economics from Harvard and his bachelor’s degree in economics from Reed College in Portland, Oregon. Jorgenson specializes in economic policy issues related to long-term growth prospects for the U.S. economy. His current research focuses on tax reform, environmental policy, education policy and economic relations between the U.S. and Japan.

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Michael Kremer
Department of Economics
Michael Kremer is the Gates Professor of Developing Societies in the Department of Economics at Harvard University and Senior Fellow at the Brookings Institution. He is a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, a recipient of a MacArthur Fellowship and a Presidential Faculty Fellowship, and was named a Young Global Leader by the World Economic Forum. Kremer’s recent research examines education and health in developing countries, immigration, and globalization. He and Rachel Glennerster published Strong Medicine: Creating Incentives for Pharmaceutical Research on Neglected Diseases, which won the Association of American Publishers Award for the Best Professional/Scholarly Book in Medical Science in 2004. He is a 2005 recipient of the International Health Economics Association’s Kenneth J. Arrow Award for Best Paper in Health Economics. In 2006, Scientific American named him one of the 50 researchers of the year.

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Robert Lawrence
Harvard Kennedy School
Robert Lawrence is Albert L. Williams Professor of International Trade and Investment. Lawrence came to the school from the Brookings Institution, where he was a senior fellow. He has taught at Johns Hopkins University and Yale University, where he received his PhD in economics. He was the New Century Senior Fellow at the Brookings Institution, and research associate at the National Bureau of Economic Research. He is on the advisory boards of the Congressional Budget Office, the Institute for International Economics, the Overseas Development Council, and the Presidential Commission on United States-Pacific Trade and Investment Policy. His research focuses on trade policy. He recently returned to Harvard after serving as a member of the President’s Council of Economic Advisors.

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Eric Maskin
Department of Economics
Eric Maskin is the Adams University Professor of Economics at Harvard University. He received the 2007 Nobel Memorial Prize in Economics (with L. Hurwicz and R. Myerson) for laying the foundations of mechanism design theory. He also has made contributions to game theory, contract theory, social choice theory, political economy, and other areas of economics. He received his A.B. and Ph.D from Harvard and was a postdoctoral fellow at Jesus College, Cambridge University. He was a faculty member at MIT from 1977-1984, Harvard from 1985-2000, and the Institute for Advanced Study from 2000-2011. He rejoined the Harvard faculty in 2012.

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Sendhil Mullainathan
Department of Economics
Sendhil Mullainathan is a Professor of Economics at Harvard University. He received his PhD in Economics from Harvard in 1998. Professor Mullainathan conducts research on development economics, behavioral economics, and corporate finance. He is an Associate at the National Bureau of Economic Research, a Founding Member of the Poverty Action Lab, and a Board Member of the Bureau of Research in the Economic. He is also the recipient of a MacArthur Foundation 'Genius Grant'.

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Felix Oberholzer-Gee
Harvard Business School
Felix Oberholzer-Gee is Andreas Andresen Professor of Business Administration in the Strategy Unit at Harvard Business School. He received his Ph.D. in Economics from the University of Zurich. Professor Oberholzer-Gee’s research examines how business strategies can be adapted to the wider business environment and to country-specific institutions. He extensively studied the impact of business regulation on firm strategy and company performance. He has also looked at the influence of nongovernmental groups on company strategy and tactics, most notably in his work on NIMBY (“Not in My Backyard”) problems. His current projects include a study on voluntary company programs to reduce carbon emissions and a project on renewable energy.

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Ariel Pakes
Department of Economics
Ariel Pakes is Thomas Professor of Economics at Harvard University, where his research has been in industrial organization, the economics of technological change, and econometric theory. Pakes is a fellow of the Econometric Society, whose Frisch Medal he won in 1986. He delivered the Fisher-Schultz Lecture at the World Congress of the Econometric Society, in 2005 in London. Pakes is also a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. He is an Editor of the RAND Journal of Economics and an associate editor of Economic Letters and the Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control. He is a research associate of the NBER and a member of the AEA Committee on Government Statistics. Pakes has been chair of the AEA Census Advisory Panel and Associate Editor of Econometrica, the Journal of Econometrics, the International Journal of Industrial Organization, and Economics of Innovation and New Technology. Before coming to Harvard in 1999, he was the Charles and Dorothea Dilley Professor of Economics at Yale University (1997-99). Pakes received his doctorate from Harvard University in 1980.

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Rohini Pande
Harvard Kennedy School
Rohini Pande is Mohammed Kamal Professor of Public Policy at the Harvard Kennedy School. Pande is a NBER Research Associate and serves on the board of the Bureau for Research and Economic Analysis of Development (BREAD) and the Committee on the Status of Women in the Economics Profession (CSWEP). Her research focuses on the economic analysis of the politics and consequences of different forms of redistribution, principally in developing countries. Prior to joining the Kennedy School, she was an Associate Professor of Economics at Yale University. She has taught at Yale University, MIT, and Columbia. A Rhodes Scholar, she is the recipient of several NSF and other research grants. She holds a Ph.D. and M.Sc. in Economics from the London School of Economics, an M.A. in Philosophy, Politics and Economics from Oxford, and a B.A. in Economics from St. Stephens College, Delhi University.

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Richard Peiser
Harvard Graduate School of Design
Richard Peiser is the Michael D. Spear Professor of Real Estate Development at the Graduate School of Design. Professor Peiser's primary research has focused on developing an understanding of the response of real estate developers to the market place and to the institutional environment in which they operate, particularly in the areas of urban redevelopment, affordable housing, and suburban sprawl. A planner and entrepreneur-developer as well as an expert in real estate finance, he has also demonstrated an interest in spatial and design issues as well as in the economics of land development. He has been active in the Urban Land Institute, where he is now a Trustee and of which he has authored numerous publications on his policy-oriented research.

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Forest Reinhardt
Harvard Business School
Forest L. Reinhardt is the John D. Black Professor of Business Administration at Harvard Business School. Most of his articles and papers analyze problems of environmental and natural resource management, focusing on the relationships between firms' market and non-market strategies. He has written numerous classroom cases on these and related topics, used at Harvard and other schools in MBA curricula and executive program training. Professor Reinhardt's current research concentrates on the relationships between business and the environment, particularly in the energy industry and in the food and agribusiness sector. He is interested in the relations between environmental regulation and corporate strategy, the behavior of private and public organizations that manage natural resources, and the economics of environmental protection.

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Steven Shavell
Harvard Law School
Steven Shavell is the Samuel R. Rosenthal Professor of Law and Economics, Director of the John M. Olin Center for Law, Economics, and Business at Harvard Law School. He received a Ph.D. in economics from M.I.T. in 1973, joined the Department of Economics at Harvard University in 1974, and moved to the faculty of Harvard Law School in 1980. His major research interests are in economic analysis of tort, contract, property, and criminal law, and in legal procedure and litigation. He has published numerous articles in professional journals and four books, most recently Foundations of Economic Analysis of Law (Harvard University Press, 2004).

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Robert Stavins
Harvard Kennedy School
Robert N. Stavins is the director of the Harvard Environmental Economics Program in the Mossavar-Rahmani Center for Business and Government and Albert Pratt Professor of Business and Government at the Kennedy School. He is the chair of the Environmental Economics Advisory Committee of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Science Advisory Board and a member of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC). Professor Stavins' research has focused on diverse areas of environmental economics and policy, including examinations of: design and implementation of market-based policy instruments; innovation and diffusion of energy-efficiency technologies; effects of cost heterogeneity on the performance of incentive-based instruments; competitiveness effects of regulation; factors affecting land use change; positive political economy of policy instrument choice; costs of carbon sequestration; and factors affecting urban water demand.

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James Stock
Department of Economics and Harvard Kennedy School
James H. Stock is the Harold Hitchings Burbank Professor of Political Economy, Faculty of Arts and Sciences and member of the faculty at Harvard Kennedy School. He received a M.S. in statistics and a Ph.D. in economics from the University of California, Berkeley. His research areas are macroeconomic forecasting, monetary policy, econometric methods, and environmental policy. He is a coauthor with Mark Watson of a leading introductory econometrics textbook and is a member of various professional boards. He previously served as Chair of the Harvard Economics Department from 2006-2009, as Co-Editor of Econometrica from 2009-2012, and as Member of the President's Council of Economic Advisers from 2013-2014.

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Lawrence Summers
Harvard Kennedy School
Lawrence Summers is President Emeritus of Harvard University. During the past two decades he has served in a series of senior policy positions, including Vice President of development economics and chief economist of the World Bank, Undersecretary of the Treasury for International Affairs, Director of the National Economic Council for the Obama Administration from 2009 to 2011, and Secretary of the Treasury of the United States, from 1999 to 2001. He received a bachelor of science degree from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1975 and was awarded a Ph.D. from Harvard in 1982. In 1983, he became one of the youngest individuals in recent history to be named as a tenured member of the Harvard University faculty. In 1987 Mr. Summers became the first social scientist ever to receive the annual Alan T. Waterman Award of the National Science Foundation (NSF) and in 1993, he was awarded the John Bates Clark Medal, given every two years to the outstanding American economist under the age of 40. He is currently the Charles W. Eliot University Professor at Harvard University.

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Cass Sunstein
Harvard Law School
Cass R. Sunstein is currently the Robert Walmsley University Professor at Harvard. He is the founder and director of the Program on Behavioral Economics and Public Policy at Harvard Law School. Mr. Sunstein has testified before congressional committees on many subjects, and he has been involved in constitution-making and law reform activities in a number of nations, including Ukraine, Poland, China, South Africa, and Russia. From 2009 to 2012, he was Administrator of the White House Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs. Mr. Sunstein is author of many articles and a number of books, including Republic.com (2001), Risk and Reason (2002), Why Societies Need Dissent (2003), The Second Bill of Rights (2004), Laws of Fear: Beyond the Precautionary Principle (2005), Worst-Case Scenarios (2001), Nudge: Improving Decisions about Health, Wealth, and Happiness (with Richard H. Thaler, 2008) and most recently Simpler: The Future of Government (2013).
e: csunstei@law.harvard.edu
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Michael Toffel
Harvard Business School
Michael Toffel is an Associate Professor at the Harvard Business School. His research examines how companies measure and reduce the environmental impacts of their operations and supply chains. He also examines alternative institutions that seek to monitor facilities’ environmental performance, including industry self-regulation programs, third-party auditors, and government voluntary approaches. He teaches "Business and the Environment", an award-winning MBA elective. He previously worked as a corporate director and consultant in environment, health, and safety management, in Southeast Asia and the United States. Toffel received a PhD in Business Administration from UC Berkeley and an MBA and Master of Environmental Management from Yale University.

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Richard Vietor
Harvard Business School
Richard Vietor is the Paul Whiton Cherington Professor of Business Administration and Senior Associate Dean at the Harvard Graduate School of Business Administration. He is currently course head of the required course, Business, Government and the International Economy. He has written extensively on energy and environmental policy, deregulation, and most recently on economic competition. He continues to be interested in energy security and climate change, and does work with NGOs, companies and governments in Latin America, Europe and Asia.

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Martin Weitzman
Department of Economics
Martin Weitzman is a Professor of Economics in the Department of Economics. Professor Weitzman is currently working in several areas of environmental economics. He is attempting to clarify the "essence" of the global-warming problem as a problem of economic growth, and to extend the scope of national income accounts to include activities related to resource depletion and environmental change. Yet another area of interest is the economics of biodiversity. Previous work examined instrument choice under uncertainty. His seminal article in this field, Prices vs. Quantities in The Review of Economic Studies, is one of the most frequently cited journal articles in the field of environmental economics and continues to provide fertile ground for new research.

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Richard Zeckhauser
Harvard Kennedy School
Richard Zeckhauser is the Frank Plumpton Ramsey Professor of Political Economy at the Harvard Kennedy School. Zeckhauser pursues a mix of conceptual and applied research. His ongoing policy investigations explore ways to promote human health, to help labor and financial markets operate more efficiently, and to foster informed and appropriate choices by individuals and government agencies. Zeckhauser's current major research addresses the performance of institutions confronted with inadequate commitment capabilities, incomplete information flow, and human participants who fail to behave in accordance with models of rationality. Financial markets and health risks are the subjects of his major empirical investigations.

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FACULTY FELLOWS
QUICK LINKS

Joseph Aldy
David Bloom
Richard Cooper
Melissa Dell
David Drake
Jeffrey Frankel
Edward Glaeser
Jerry Green
James Hammitt
Rema Hanna
Rebecca Henderson
William Hogan
Richard Hornbeck
Dale Jorgenson
Michael Kremer
Robert Lawrence
Eric Maskin
Sendhil Mullainathan
Felix Oberholzer-Gee
Ariel Pakes
Rohini Pande
Richard Peiser
Forest Reinhardt
Steven Shavell
Robert Stavins
James Stock
Lawrence Summers
Cass Sunstein
Michael Toffel
Richard Vietor
Martin Weitzman
Richard Zeckhauser

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