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PEOPLE: PRE-DOCTORAL FELLOWS

Maria Acevedo
Ph.D. Student in Public Policy
Maria Cecilia Acevedo holds an MPA in International Development from Harvard University, and a Master's degree in Economics from Universidad de los Andes in Bogota, Colombia, where she was a professor prior to coming to Harvard. At Universidad de los Andes she was also Research Director of the Center for Strategy and Competitiveness, where she helped launched competitiveness initiatives at the national and regional levels. She has published a book on industrial development policy and academic articles on regional economic development. At Harvard, she was a 2009 recipient of the Norberg-Bohm Fellowship, awarded by the Kennedy School's Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, and 2012 recipient of the Samuel P. Huntington Doctoral Dissertation Fellowship awarded by the Weatherhead Center for International Affairs. She is interested in investigating causal mechanisms of the effect of climate variables on civil conflict outcomes. She also seeks to understand household adaptation to climate change and labor market impacts of extreme weather events in developing countries.

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Megan Bailey
Ph.D. Student in Public Policy
Megan seeks to evaluate the environmental efficacy and economic efficiency of policy options for curbing greenhouse gas emissions, such as carbon taxes and cap-and-trade systems, at both national and international levels. Additionally, she is interested in the non-market valuation of ecosystem services, particularly those at risk to be lost via ecological collapse. Megan holds a B.S. in Ecology, Evolution, and Organismal Biology; a B.A. in Art; and an M.A. in International Relations from California State University, Fresno and is the recipient of a National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship.

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Jonathan Baker
Ph.D. Student in Public Policy
Jonathan is interested in investigating economic institutions for sustainable water use in developing countries and the interrelationships between economic institutions, social institutions, technical systems, the hydrologic system, and climate change. Jonathan’s academic background includes an undergraduate degree in physics and a masters in mechanical engineering, in which he studied fluid power. He is currently finishing a second masters in technology policy, in which he has focused on water resources within the context of large scale (CGE) economic models.

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Dana Beuschel
Ph.D. Student in Economics
Dana's research interests include valuation of environmental amenities, the interaction of location and energy use, and the relationship between energy policy and transportation decisions. She graduated from the University of Michigan in 2011 with a BA in Economics and German and a Bachelor of Business Administration from the Ross School of Business.

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Gabriel Chan
Ph.D. Student in Public Policy
Gabe’s research interests are focused on climate policy and energy economics.  He is interested in the interaction of climate policy and international trade policy inducing emission leakage.  Gabe is also interested in energy technology innovation, specifically government energy research and development policy.  Gabe received his undergraduate degrees in Political Science and Earth, Atmospheric and Planetary Science at M.I.T and has worked at the U.S. Department of Energy in the Office of Climate Change Policy and Technology.
w: http://scholar.harvard.edu/gabechan

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Rohit Chandra
Ph.D. Student in Public Policy
Rohit's research focuses on the history, evolution and dynamics of energy markets in South Asia, particularly in India. He has looked primarily at coal, electricity and natural gas markets, and their supply chains, governance, and distortions. He is also more generally interested in natural resource economics in developing countries and the economic effects of resource extraction on local communities. He graduated from the University of Pennsylvania in 2010 with a BSc in Electrical Engineering and has worked in New Delhi for two years at the Centre for Policy Research.

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Cuicui Chen
Ph.D. Student in Public Policy
Cuicui is interested in industrial organization and political economy questions in areas of the environment and energy. Her previous research includes evaluation of the general equilibrium effects of biofuel mandates in U.S. and EU, analysis of the role of the automotive industry in increasing the use of alternative fuels in place of traditional ones, in the context of indirect network effects between fuels and vehicles, and exploration of new quantile estimators given measurement errors in the left-hand-side variable. She graduated from Tsinghua University in 2010 with a Bachelor's degree in Environmental Engineering, and from Massachusetts Institute Technology in 2012 with a Master of Science degree in Technology and Policy.

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Thom Covert
Ph.D. Student in Business Economics
Thom's research interests are environmental economics, energy markets, and technical innovation in energy and health. He worked for 3 years as an economics consultant, with a focus on litigation in energy markets.

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Nathan Fleming
Ph.D. Student in Public Policy
Nathan is interested in natural resource economics and security studies: Specifically, he is interested in understanding how access to natural resources affects national security and potentially drives conflict. He also has a related interest in manufacturing firm strategies for securing critical materials. He is currently a doctoral student in Public Policy at the Harvard Kennedy School. He began his career as a mechanical engineer; he designed aircraft engines at General Electric for 5 years before returning to school to earn SM degrees in Mechanical Engineering and Technology & Policy at MIT.

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Todd Gerarden
Ph.D. Student in Public Policy
Todd's interests lie in environmental economics, energy economics, and technology adoption. His previous research includes study of federal regulation of the offshore oil industry, energy efficiency finance and capitalization of green home certifications in sale prices, and employment impacts of investment in alternative energy technologies. Todd graduated from the University of Virginia in 2010 with a B.S. in Mechanical Engineering and was selected as a Truman Scholar. Before beginning doctoral studies, he worked at the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy and Resources for the Future.

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Tara Grillos
Ph.D. Student in Public Policy
Tara's area of research is environment and development policy. In particular, she is interested in access to clean water and accounting for ecosystem services lost due to deforestation. Tara graduated with a B.A. in International Studies and a B.S. in Economics from the University of Pennsylvania and the Wharton School. She then spent two years as a Peace Corps Volunteer in Honduras, where she worked with community water boards and micro-lending groups in rural areas, and with an educational center for at-risk urban youth.

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Alicia Harley
Ph.D. Student in Public Policy
Alicia is interested in regional and global food systems and their relationship to agriculture and water policies especially under the constraints of current and future climate change. Her research interests also include linking knowledge with action and translating research into effective policy for sustainability and development. Alicia obtained her BA in Environmental Science and Public Policy from Harvard in 2008 and received a Fulbright grant to research agriculture systems and food security in Egypt in 2009-2010.

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Sabrina Howell
Ph.D. Student in Political Economy and Government
Sabrina is interested in energy policy and economics; particularly the deployment of disruptive energy technologies in China and the U.S. She is a recipient of the National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship. She holds a B.A. in Economics and East Asian Studies from Yale University. Since graduating in 2008, she has taught sustainable development and energy economics in China and worked as a Senior Policy Analyst at Securing America's Future Energy (SAFE) in Washington, D.C.

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Julia Joo-A Lee
Ph.D. Student in Public Policy
Joo-A is interested in how social psychology and behavioral economics may encourage more environmentally sustainable consumer behavior.  Her current project includes understanding the effects of specific emotions on consumer environmental decisions.  She holds a BA in Political Science from Korea University, an AM in East Asia/Political Economy from Harvard University, and an MPP in Business and Government from the Harvard Kennedy School.  Most recently, she received a Graduate Student Award from the Mind/Brain/Behavior interfaculty initiative.  

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Janhavi Nilekani
Ph.D. Student in Public Policy
Janhavi is interested in sustainable development and energy policies in developing countries, particularly India. She graduated from Yale University with a B.A. in Economics and in International Studies. Her previous research has focused on the impact of political affirmative action for caste and gender in Indian local governments, and on the impact of India's job guarantee scheme (NREGA) on women workers. 

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Pascal Noel
Ph.D. Student in Economics
Pascal’s research interests include optimal energy taxation, the design and impact of energy investment incentives, and pricing in transportation markets.  Pascal received a B.A. in Economics and in Ethics, Politics, and Economics from Yale in 2006 and an MSc in Economics from the London School of Economics in 2007. He worked for two years as a research assistant on The Hamilton Project at Brookings, where his research focused on climate change, energy security, and per-mile pricing of auto insurance. From 2009 to 2011 he was a senior policy advisor on the National Economic Council at the White House.

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Jisung Park
Ph.D. Student in Economics
Jisung's research interests center around the economics of climate change, in particular issues of policy design and valuation of climate damages. He is also interested in payments for ecosystem services, particularly with respect to biodiversity conservation. Jisung graduated from Columbia University in 2009 with a BA in economics and political science, and received a Rhodes Scholarship to pursue graduate study at the University of Oxford. He holds Master's degrees in Environmental Change and Management ('10) and Development Economics (candidate, '11) from Oxford.
w: http://www.iq.harvard.edu/people/jisung-park

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Trisha Shrum
Ph.D. Student in Public Policy
Trisha's research interests include climate change mitigation and energy policy, as seen through the disciplinary lenses of environmental and behavioral ecomonics. She graduated from the University of Kansas with bachelor's degrees in Ecology and Evolutionary Biology and Environmental Science and with a minor in Economics. She went on to work on climate change and energy policy as a research fellow at the Kansas Energy Council. Last spring, she graduated from the Yale School of Forestry and Environmental Studies with a Masters in Environmental Science.

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Samuel Stolper
Ph.D. Student in Public Policy
Sam is interested in measuring the costs and benefits of a variety of environmental problems and policies – especially those pertaining to climate change. He is working on three research projects: A study of energy taxes and competition in gasoline markets; an evaluation of U.S. state renewable portfolio standards for electricity; and an assessment of the impact of water pollution on health in India. Sam is also currently the teaching fellow for a master's course in "economic analysis of public policy" and the teacher of an undergraduate seminar on the economics of climate change. Previously, he has worked at the Kennedy School's Center for International Development (CID) and Sustainability Science Program (SSP), as well as the D.C. think thank Resources for the Future (RFF).

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Richard Sweeney
Ph.D. Student in Public Policy
Rich's interests typically lie at the intersection of environmental economics and energy policy. He graduated from Boston College in 2004 with a B.S. in Economics and Political Science, and then studied post-Communist transition at C.E.R.G.E. in the Czech Republic on a Fulbright scholarship. Rich also spent two years as a research assistant at Resources for the Future, where his research involved electricity regulation, climate policy design and the economics of renewable energy.

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Dmitry Taubinsky
Ph.D. Student in Business Economics
Dmitry’s research interests are in behavioral economics, specifically, social preferences, time discounting, and market implications of consumer biases. Using a combination of theory, lab experiments, and field experiments, Dmitry works on topics such as optimal taxation when consumers are inattentive to energy costs, and the structure of social norms governing public goods provision and other social interactions. He obtained his B.A. in applied mathematics from Harvard in 2009.
w: http://drfd.hbs.edu/fit/public/facultyInfo.do?facInfo=bio&facEmId=dtaubinsky@hbs.edu

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Daniel Velez-Lopez
Ph.D. Student in Public Policy
Daniel is interested in environmental and natural resource economics, public finance and development economics. In particular, he is interested in how taxes and subsidies in developing countries can have perverse effects on the environment and how social policy and environmental policy interact in the developing country setting. His prior research experience includes looking at the effects on households of a carbon tax as part of a deficit reduction plan in the United States, evaluating conservation policy in Latin America, and estimating the value of natural resources in the Gulf of Mexico. Before coming here, Daniel studied economics and mathematics at the University of Maryland - College Park and worked at Resources for the Future.

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Elizabeth Walker
Ph.D. Student in Public Policy
Elizabeth Walker is interested in the provision and valuation of ecosystem goods and services, as well as market design for environmental goods.  She is currently involved with research related to the sustainable distribution of clean water in rural Africa.  She spent a year in Mozambique with the organization TechnoServe, where she contributed to agriculture-based economic development projects.  Prior to this, she spent two years as a consultant for McKinsey & Company. Elizabeth obtained her undergraduate degree from MIT, where she studied environmental engineering science.

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Lilei Xu
Ph.D. Student in Economics
Lilei would like to apply the methods of industrial organization to study energy economics, environmental economics, and climate change policies. She is also very interested in institutional arrangements that are conducive to innovation and entrepreneurship. Lilei graduated from MIT with a B.S. in economics and mathematics in 2010.

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PEOPLE: PLACEMENTS FOR CURRENT AND RECENTLY-GRADUATED FELLOWS

Olga Rostapshova
Ph.D. Public Policy 2013
Senior Evaluation Specialist, Social Science Genetics Association Consortium (SSGAC)
Olga's research interests include climate change, environmental policy in transition economies and firm decision-making under uncertainty. She had previously completed research projects modeling: non-point source pollution; fishery management strategies; energy portfolio optimization; and the effects of uncertainty and irreversibility on the design and timing of environmental policy. Before coming to Harvard she worked as a senior consultant for the Quantitative Economics and Statistics group at Ernst & Young LLP, where she focused on econometric modeling, economic impact and taxation analysis, biotechnology industry strategy, and risk mitigation and consumer regulation compliance for large financial services firms. Olga completed her undergraduate work at Swarthmore College and holds a B.S. in Engineering and B.A. in Economics, with Environmental Studies and Public Policy concentrations. She is the recipient of the National Science Foundation Graduate Fellowship, Morris K. Udall scholarship for the environment, U.S. Army Excellence in Science and Engineering award, National Institutes of Health biomedical fellowship, Sam Hayes III grant for business economics, and the Scheur grant for the environment. In addition, she has served as the U.S. representative to the United Nations Environmental Youth Conference and is a Sigma Xi Research Honor Society associate member.
w: http://www.linkedin.com/pub/olga-rostapshova/1b/866/539

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PEOPLE: PRE-DOCTORAL FELLOWS ALUMNI

Arturo Aguilar
Ph.D. Economics 2012
Assistant Professor of Economics, Instituto Tecnológico Autónomo de México (ITAM)
Arturo's research interests are in development, labor, and applied econometrics (including the influence of environmental components). In his most recent work he has analyzed the medium-term effects that early-life weather shocks have on physical and cognitive development of children (joint with Marta Vicarelli). He employs weather shocks related to "El Niño Southern Oscillation" (ENSO) event to identify negative early-life conditions. The paper also evaluates the potential mitigating effects that a poverty-alleviation program (Progresa in Mexico) had against the negative weather conditions. Arturo holds a B.A. in economics from Instituto Tecnológico Autónomo de México (ITAM).
w: http://cie.itam.mx/englishversion/research/cie_research.html#aguilar

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Joseph E. Aldy
Ph.D. Economics 2005
Assistant Professor of Public Policy at the Harvard Kennedy School
Joe Aldy is an Assistant Professor of Public Policy at the Harvard Kennedy School.  His research focuses on climate change policy, energy policy, and mortality risk valuation.  Before coming to HKS, he served as the Special Assistant to the President for Energy and Environment, reporting through both the National Economic Council and the Office of Energy and Climate Change.  Aldy was a Fellow at Resources for the Future from 2005 to 2009 and served on the staff of the President’s Council of Economic Advisers from 1997 to 2000.  He also served as the Co-Director of the Harvard Project on International Climate Agreements, Co-Director of the International Energy Workshop, and Treasurer for the Association of Environmental and Resource Economists before joining the Obama Administration.  He holds a PhD in economics from Harvard University, a Master of Environmental Management degree from the Nicholas School of the Environment, and a BA from Duke University.
w: http://www.hks.harvard.edu/about/faculty-staff-directory/joseph-aldy

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Hunt Allcott
Ph.D. Public Policy 2009
Assistant Professor, Department of Economics, New York University
Hunt's environmental research interests include technological change in the energy industry, tradable allowance markets, and automotive fuel economy. In development economics, he focuses on poverty alleviation and the energy industry in Latin America. He came to Harvard from the consultancy Cambridge Energy Research Associates, where he advised energy companies on climate change, emissions markets, and renewable energy. He is a recipient of the Joseph Crump Fellowship. Hunt holds a B.S. and M.S. in engineering from Stanford University. His research at Stanford, in the Goldman Honors Program in Environmental Science, Technology, and Policy, focused on the economics of the California Zero Emission Vehicle Program. Hunt was a Postdoctoral Fellow with the Massachusetts Institute of Technology’s Department of Economics during academic years 2009-10 and 2010-11.
w: https://files.nyu.edu/ha32/public/index.html

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Lori S. Bennear
Ph.D. Public Policy 2004
Assistant Professor of Environmental Economics and Policy, Nicholas School of Environment and Earth Sciences, Duke University
Lori S. Bennear's research interests include environmental and natural resource economics, applied microeconomics, and empirical methods. Her research focuses on estimating the effects of various regulatory innovations on measures of facility-level environmental performance, such as pollution levels, chemical use, and technology choice. Recent work has focused on measuring the effectiveness of management-based regulations, which require each regulated entity to develop its own internal rules and initiates to achieve reductions in pollution, as well as the effectiveness of regulations that mandate public reporting of toxic emissions.
w: http://www.nicholas.duke.edu/people/faculty/bennear.html

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Jonathan Borck
Ph.D. Public Policy 2008
Manager, Analysis Group
Dr. Borck specializes in the application of economics and statistics in the areas of energy, the environment, and finance. His case work in energy and the environment has included analyses of state and federal climate policies, allowance allocation in cap-and-trade programs, and oxygenate use in gasoline. He has supported academic affiliates in the estimation of damages from environmental contamination and in the use of hedonic property value, benefit transfer, and contingent valuation methodologies for valuing natural resources and quantifying environmental damages. In finance, he has supported several academic affiliates in analyzing the performance of mortgages and mortgage-backed securities; in designing and critiquing statistical sampling methodologies; in reviewing the history of public policy toward home ownership and mortgage lending; and in analyzing the structure of total return swaps.
w: http://www.analysisgroup.com/jonathan_borck.aspx

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Jing Cao
Ph.D. Public Policy 2007
Associate Professor, Department of Economics, School of Economics and Management, Tsinghua University, Beijing China
Jing Cao is an assistant professor at the Department of Economics, School of Economics and Management, Tsinghua University. Her research interests are in the economics of the environment, energy economics, integrated modeling of economic and environment system, climate change economics and modeling, productivity and economic growth. Her research has included the estimation of co-benefits of greenhouse gas abatement activities at the technology level and policy level, computable general equilibrium modeling on optimal environmental taxation, assessment of environmental health damage for China, and integrated top-down and bottom-up modeling on induced technology change and economy-wide policy effects. Currently her research is focused on empirically testing the cost of China's environmental policy on firms' performance, green productivity measurement, integrated modeling of climate change, energy system and land use changes.
w: http://www.sem.tsinghua.edu.cn

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Steve Cicala
Ph.D. Economics 2013
Assistant Professor, The Harris School of Public Policy, The University of Chicago
Steve's research focuses on the economics of environmental regulation. His current work studies the role that clean firms play in extending more stringent emissions standards to incumbent firms that have historically been exempt from some of the most burdensome environmental regulations. Steve received his A.B. in Economics with Honors--and Political Science-- from The University of Chicago in 2004, followed by two years as a research associate at the Becker Center on Chicago Price Theory. Before taking up economics, Steve worked as a Protocol Consultant for the Global Learning and Observations to Benefit the Environment (GLOBE) Program at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center.

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J.R. DeShazo
Ph.D. Urban Planning, with Economics Concentration 1997
Luskin Center Director, Professor of Public Policy and Urban Planning, UCLA School of Public Affairs
J.R. DeShazo is the Director of the Luskin Center for Innovation at the University of California at Los Angeles. He also is a Professor and Vice Chair of the Department of Public Policy in the Luskin School of Public Affairs at UCLA, where he is an expert in economics, public finance, and organizational governance. He holds a Ph.D. in Urban Planning from Harvard University and a M.Sc. in Economics from Oxford University, where he was a Rhodes Scholar. He was the Director of the Ralph and Goldy Lewis Center for Regional Policy Studies at UCLA for 5 years (2004-2011). He was awarded Professor of the Year, Masters Program in Public Policy, UCLA in 2001, 2005, and 2007. He received the Center for American Politics and Public Policy Fellowship at UCLA in 1999. He was a faculty associate at the Harvard Institute for International Development (1997-2000), where he was the Commencement Marshal at Harvard University in 1997, received the Harvard University Fellowship in 1992-1995, and was a Marshall Scholar Nominee in 1989. Dr. DeShazo has published over 40 articles and has over 800 citations in Google Scholar.
w: http://publicaffairs.ucla.edu/jr-deshazo

Wenhua Di
Ph.D. Public Policy 2004
Senior Economist, Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas
Wenhua Di is a senior economist in the Community Development Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas. Her current research interests include housing economics, program evaluation and consumer finances. Before she joined the Dallas Fed, she was a visiting assistant professor at the University of Texas at Dallas. She taught probability and statistics, econometrics, environmental economics and resource economics. She also worked at the development and research group at the World Bank.
w: http://www.dallasfed.org/cd/bios/di.cfm

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Karen Fisher-Vanden
Ph.D. Public Policy 1999
Associate Professor of Environmental and Resource Economics, Penn State University
Karen Fisher-Vanden’s areas of research include economic and integrated assessment modeling for climate change policy analysis; economic instruments for pollution control; and technology development in developing countries (in particular, China) and implications for energy use and carbon emissions. She is currently involved in a number of externally-funded research projects including: (1) Research in Integrated Assessment, Inter-Model Development, Testing and Diagnostics (joint with Stanford University); (2) an examination of the effects of foreign influence on technological development in China; and (3) the development of an improved model of endogenous technical change that captures uncertain R&D returns and climate response. 
w: http://www.aers.psu.edu/faculty/KFisher-Vanden/default.cfm

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David Hemous
Ph.D. Economics 2012
Assistant Professor in Economics and Political Sciences, INSEAD
David's interests are in environmental economics, growth theory, trade theory, and contract theory. In particular, he has worked on the design of efficient policies to address climate change, taking into account the endogenous direction of technological change, and on the interaction between climate policies and international trade. He graduated from the École Polytechnique (France) with majors in Physics and Economics.
w: http://www.insead.edu/facultyresearch/faculty/profiles/dhemous/

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Sounman Hong
Ph.D Public Policy 2012
Postdoctoral Fellow, Harvard University Institute for Quantitative Social Science (IQSS)
Sounman's research interests are environmental economics, technological innovation, and international trade. Before starting his Ph.D. studies, he worked for four years as a consultant for Samil PricewaterhouseCoopers and McKinsey & Company, and for two years as Deputy Director for trade policy planning in the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Trade of the Republic of Korea. During his tenure in the Korean government, he was a member of the Korean delegation to the Korea-United States Free Trade Agreement negotiation. Sounman is also a member of the Korean Institute of Certified Public Accountants. 

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Darby Jack
Ph.D. Public Policy 2005
Assistant Professor, Department of Environmental Health Sciences, Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University
Darby Jack is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Environmental Health Sciences at Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health. He studies environmental health risks in developing countries, the health impacts of climate change, and the role of the urban environment in shaping health. For the last several years his primary focus has been the health effects of exposure to indoor air pollution from biomass fuels. With support from the Center for Environmental Health in Northern Manhattan, he has helped to develop a Columbia-wide biomass working group, which coordinates and supports interdisciplinary research on the topic. These collaborations have given rise to current efforts to measure the health benefits of clean cookstoves in Ghana, Kenya, and India. He holds a Ph.D. from Harvard University and an undergraduate degree from Williams College.
w: http://www.mailman.columbia.edu/our-faculty/profile?uni=dj2183

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Kelsey Jack
Ph.D. Public Policy 2010
Assistant Professor, Department of Economics, Tufts University
Kelsey Jack received her Ph.D. in Public Policy from Harvard University in 2010, followed by a post-doctoral appointment at MIT with the Jameel Poverty Action Lab and the Agricultural Technology Adoption Initiative. She joined the Tufts faculty in 2011. Her research focuses on the intersection of environmental and development economics and investigates questions from behavioral economics and contract theory. Current research projects study the design of incentives for the private provision of public goods, and are applied to issues of environment and health in Malawi, Zambia and Bolivia. Her research uses field experiments and lab experiments implemented in the field to evaluate interventions and test theory. Prior to graduate school, Kelsey lived in Laos for two years, where she worked for a conservation NGO.
w: http://ase.tufts.edu/econ/faculty/jack.asp

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Supreet Kaur
Ph.D. Political Economy and Government 2012
Assistant Professor of Economics, Columbia University
Supreet is interested in environmental issues in developing countries. Her current projects include reducing air pollution by targeting asymmetric information in fuel markets, and understanding the effects of groundwater depletion and soil degradation on economic and social outcomes in agricultural areas. She holds a B.S. in Operations Research from Columbia University and an MPA in International Development (MPA/ID) from the Harvard Kennedy School. Her research has received support from the Consortium on Energy Policy Research at Harvard.
w: http://econ.columbia.edu/supreet-kaur

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Nathaniel Keohane
Ph.D. Political Economy and Government 2001
Vice President, Environmental Defense Fund (EDF)
Nat Keohane works to develop and advocate environmentally responsible and economically sound climate policies aimed at reducing emissions of greenhouse gases. He seeks to bring economic theory and empirical analysis to bear on questions such as the optimal design of cap-and-trade systems and the long-term impacts of climate policy on the U.S. economy. Nat's research focuses on the design and performance of market-based environmental policies. Nat was formerly an assistant professor at Yale School of Organization and Management, and is on leave as Director of Economic Policy and Analysis, Environmental Defense Fund.
w: http://www.edf.org/news/nathaniel-keohane-rejoins-edf-vice-president

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Suzi Kerr
Ph.D. Economics 1995
Senior Fellow, Motu Economic and Public Policy Research, Wellington, New Zealand
Suzi Kerr has worked as a housing analyst for the New Zealand Treasury and at the University of Maryland as an Assistant Professor. She has also been a visiting scholar at Resources for the Future, Victoria University (New Zealand), and the Joint Center for the Science and Policy of Global Change at MIT. Her current research work empirically and theoretically investigates domestic and international emissions trading issues, with special emphasis on land use and climate change in both the tropics and New Zealand, domestic carbon permit market design, and other topics in environmental policy.
w: http://www.motu.org.nz/about/people/suzi_kerr

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Avinash Kishore
Ph.D. Public Policy 2012
Post-Doctoral Fellow, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI)
Avinash is interested in agriculture, environment, and development economics. At IFPRI, he will work on projects that seek to bridge the gap between laboratories and farms in Indian agriculture using action research in collaboration with agricultural universities, agribusiness firms and farmers.
w: http://www.ifpri.org/staffprofile/avinash-kishore

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Carolyn Kousky
Ph.D. Political Economy and Government 2008
Fellow, Resources for the Future, Washington, D.C.
Carolyn Kousky’s research focuses on natural resource management, decisionmaking under uncertainty, and individual and societal responses to natural disaster risk. She has examined how individuals learn about extreme event risk, the demand for natural disaster insurance, and policy responses to potential changes in extreme events with climate change. She is also interested in ecosystem services policy, and has examined the design of incentive-based mechanisms to supply ecosystem services and the use of natural capital to reduce vulnerability to weather-related disasters.
w: http://www.rff.org/Researchers/Pages/ResearchersBio.aspx?ResearcherID=1262

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Cynthia Lin
Ph.D. Economics 2006
Associate Professor, Department of Agricultural and Resource Economics, University of California at Davis
Cynthia Lin is an associate professor with a joint appointment in the Agricultural and Resource Economics Department and the Environmental Science and Policy Department at the University of California at Davis. Professor Lin is also the President of the U.S. Association for Energy Economics Bay Area Chapter and a Research Associate at the Harvard University John F. Kennedy School of Government. She is one of the seven economists selected to serve on the California State Controller's Council of Economic Advisors. She was formerly the Fossil Fuels Tract Director of the Sustainable Transportation Energy Pathways Program of the UC-Davis Institute of Transportation Studies. Professor Lin's fields of interest are environmental and natural resource economics, energy economics, industrial organization, and applied microeconomics. Among her current areas of research are the petroleum industry, renewable energy, natural resources, environmental regulation, and air quality.
w: http://www.des.ucdavis.edu/faculty/Lin/

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Ruben Lubowski
Ph.D. Political Economy and Government 2002
Chief Natural Resource Economist, Environmental Defense Fund
Ruben Lubowski, Ph.D., specializes in natural resource economics and climate policy. He oversees internal analytical efforts and works with external researchers and policy practitioners to design and implement carbon markets and other strategies to address global climate change. He is widely recognized for his expertise in analyzing and modeling land-use changes and policy approaches for reducing emissions through forestry, agriculture, and bioenergy activities. Ruben has testified before the U.S. Senate and developed analyses for decision-makers around the world. He has presented in academic and policy settings and published in books, government reports, and professional journals.
w: http://www.edf.org/page.cfm?tagID=40245

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Robyn Meeks
Ph.D. Public Policy 2012
Assistant Professor, School of Natural Resources and Environment, University of Michigan
Robyn's research interests include water resource management; rural water supply and sanitation; and, more broadly, environmental and development economics. After obtaining her bachelor's degree in political science from Brown University, Robyn taught environmental studies as a Peace Corps volunteer in Kazakhstan. She then received an M.E.M. in water resources management from Yale University, where she was awarded the Foreign Language and Area Studies fellowship for study of the Russian language. After obtaining her master's degree, Robyn consulted for the Energy and Environment Group at the United Nations Development Programme. Most recently, as a Fulbright recipient, she researched tariff collection in rural water supply systems in the Kyrgyz Republic. Meeks was a 2007 recipient of the Norberg-Bohm Fellowship, awarded by the Kennedy School's Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs.
w: http://www.snre.umich.edu/profile/robyn_meeks

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Richard Newell
Ph.D. Public Policy 1997
Gendell Associate Professor of Energy and Environmental Economics, Nicholas School of Environment, Duke University
Director, Duke University Energy Initiative

In addition to his position at Duke, Richard Newell is a Research Associate of the National Bureau of Economic Research and a University Fellow of Resources for the Future. Professor Newell’s research centers on the economics of markets and policies for the environment, energy, and related technologies, particularly the cost and effectiveness of alternatives for reducing greenhouse gas emissions and achieving other environmental and energy goals. Economic analysis of market-based policies, technology policies, and the influence of markets and policy on technology innovation and adoption are important themes in his work. Richard served as Administrator of federal government’s Energy Information Administration from spring 2009 through June 2011.
w: http://www.nicholas.duke.edu/people/faculty/newell.html

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Sheila Olmstead
Ph.D. Public Policy 2002
Associate Professor of Public Affairs, Lyndon B. Johnson School of Public Affairs, The University of Texas at Austin
Sheila Olmstead’s research focuses on natural resource management and pollution control, with a particular emphasis on water resource economics, including urban water demand management, market-based approaches to water conservation, drinking water quality regulation, access to drinking water among low-income populations, and the efficient allocation of water across sectors. Her recent work investigates the impacts of information disclosure on drinking water quality violations, regulatory avoidance under the U.S. Safe Drinking Water Act, the influence of federal fire suppression policy on land development in the American West, and key components of a post-2012 international climate policy architecture. Before coming to the University of Texas in 2013, Olmstead was a Fellow at RFF (2010-2013). Olmstead was an Associate Professor (2007-2010) and Assistant Professor (2002-2007) of Environmental Economics at the Yale School of Forestry and Environmental Studies.
w: http://www.utexas.edu/lbj/directory/faculty/sheila-olmstead

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William Pizer
Ph.D. Economics 1996
Associate Professor, Sanford School of Public Policy, Duke University
William A. Pizer is the former Deputy Assistant Secretary for Environment and Energy at the US Department of the Treasury. Prior to coming to the Treasury, and throughout his involvement with the Harvard Project, Pizer was a Senior Fellow at Resources for the Future where his research looked at how the design of environmental policy affects costs and environmental effectiveness, often related to global climate change.
w: http://fds.duke.edu/db/Sanford/faculty/billy.pizer

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Matthew Ranson
Ph.D. Public Policy 2012
Associate, Environment and Resources Division, Abt Associates Inc.
His primary research interests include non-market valuation, climate change, toxic air pollution, and housing. His dissertation research focused on developing a new "discontinuity matching" methodology for identification of marginal willingness to pay in hedonic property value models. Matthew graduated from Harvard University in 2002 with an A.B. in Environmental Science and Public Policy and Economics, magna cum laude with high honors in field. Before beginning his PhD, he also worked at Abt Associates, where he conducted cost-benefit analysis for a variety of U.S. EPA regulations and co-authored several journal articles analyzing how researchers' methodological choices affect the results of revealed and stated preference valuation models.
w: http://matthewhranson.com

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Todd Schatzki
Ph.D. Public Policy 1998
Vice President, Analysis Group
Dr. Schatzki specializes in the application of microeconomics, econometrics, and data analysis to litigation, complex business issues, and public policy. Dr. Schatzki has worked with leading academic experts on all stages of potential litigation, ranging from informal discussions with regulators to preparation of expert reports. He has also written extensively, particularly in the area of energy and environmental economics.
w: http://www.analysisgroup.com/todd_schatzki.aspx

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Kate R.E. Sims
Ph.D. Political Economy and Government 2008

Assistant Professor, Department of Economics, Amherst College
Katharine R. E. Sims is visiting the Harvard Environmental Economics Program while on junior sabbatical from Amherst College. At Amherst, she is an assistant professor in the Economics Department and affiliate of the Environmental Studies program. Her research explores the economics of land conservation policies, including protected areas, local land-use regulations, and payments for ecosystem services. Her current work includes a collaborative project supported by the NSF and 3ie to evaluate the environmental and socioeconomic impacts of Mexico’s national payments for ecosystem services program. Kate earned her B.A. in Ecology and Evolutionary Biology from Princeton University in 1998 and her Ph.D. from Harvard in Political Economy and Government in 2008. She has previously been a Pre-Doctoral Fellow with the Harvard Environmental Economics Program and with the Sustainability Science Program at the Center for International Development. Prior to graduate studies, she worked as a researcher for non-profit and business organizations in the field of socially responsible investing and taught science in Chiang Mai, Thailand.
w: https://cms.amherst.edu/people/facstaff/ksims

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E. Somanathan
Ph.D. Economics 1995

Professor in the Planning Unit, Indian Statistical Institute, Delhi
E."Som" Somanathan received a Ph.D. in economics from Harvard in 1995 and taught at Emory University and the University of Michigan at Ann Arbor before joining the Indian Statistical Institute, Delhi, where he is Professor in the Planning Unit.  His main research interests are in development economics, particularly environmental problems and political economy, and in the evolution of norms and preferences. His recent papers include “Climate Change: Challenges Facing India’s Poor” with Rohini Somanathan, Economic and Political Weekly, 44(31): 51-58, August 1, 2009, and “Decentralization for cost-effective conservation” with R. Prabhakar and B.S. Mehta, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the USA, 106(11): 4143-4147, March 17, 2009.
w: http://www.isid.ac.in/~som/

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Edmond Toy
Ph.D. Health Policy 2002
Manager, Analysis Group
Dr. Toy specializes in economic analysis related to health care and the environment. His recent projects have included analyses of large claims databases to measure patient treatment compliance, resource utilization, and health outcomes across a variety of diseases; budget impact analyses; and development of a quantitative model to analyze the effects of national health care trends and policies on the strategic position of a large pharmaceutical company. Dr. Toy also has supported testifying experts in intellectual property matters related to pharmaceuticals, and in cases involving economic damages stemming from groundwater contamination. Prior to joining Analysis Group, Dr. Toy served in the White House Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs, where he coordinated the review of environmental and transportation-related regulations.
w: http://www.analysisgroup.com/edmond_toy.aspx

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Gergely Ujhelyi
Ph.D. Economics 2007
Assistant Professor, Economics Department, University of Houston
Ujhelyi's research focuses on applied theory, political economy, and environmental economics. Specific topics he has addressed are models of lobbying and collective action, campaign finance, corruption; environmental regulation, environmental agreements; and social learning.
w: http://www.class.uh.edu/faculty/gujhelyi/

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Alex Wagner
Ph.D. Political Economy and Government 2005
Assistant Professor of Finance and Financial Markets, University of Zurich
Alexander F. Wagner is a Swiss Finance Institute (SFI) assistant professor at the University of Zurich, Switzerland. He holds a Ph.D. from Harvard University. His previous degrees include a doctorate in economics and a law degree from the University of Linz, Austria. Alex has received several awards, including the ring of honor of the Republic of Austria and the Austrian Academy of Sciences' APART fellowship, awarded to outstanding researchers under the age of 35. In his research, Alex studies corporate finance and governance, as well as tradable permit markets and the political economy of the environment. He has significant economic and management consulting experience and is the co-founder and managing director of an investment boutique based in Zurich.
w: http://www.isb.uzh.ch/institut/staff/wagner.alexander/

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Gernot Wagner
Ph.D. Political Economy and Government 2007
Senior Economist, Environmental Defense Fund
Gernot Wagner co-leads EDF's office of economic policy and analysis to advocate for market-based solutions to a wide range of environmental problems. His particular focus is on climate and energy economics. He teaches energy economics as adjunct faculty at Columbia's School of International and Public Affairs, and is the author of But Will the Planet Notice? (2011). Gernot is a research associate at the Kennedy School and a term member of the Council on Foreign Relations. He previously wrote for the editorial board of the Financial Times and worked for the Boston Consulting Group.
w: http://www.gwagner.com

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Fei Yu
Ph.D. Public Policy 2008
Natural Resources Economist, Asian Development Bank
Fei Yu is a natural resources economist at the Asian Development Bank. She was previously an Assistant Professor of Economics at Colby College, Maine. Her research has focused on emissions trading, the health impact of pollution, voluntary business environmental programs, and cost benefit analysis. In her current position at the Asian Development Bank, she is responsible for development projects in China concerning the regulatory framework for improving the rural environment, solid waste management, soil conservation, renewable energy, and climate change adaptation.

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Fan Zhang
Ph.D. Public Policy 2007
Economist, The World Bank
Fan Zhang is an Economist at the World Bank. She was previously an Assistant Professor of Energy Policy and Economics at Pennsylvania State University. Her research has been focused on climate change policy, investment behavior under uncertainty and the welfare implications of rate of return (ROR) regulation. She has studied on the impact of electricity price uncertainty on emission permits banking, the dynamic impact of ROR regulation on emission trading when permit prices are uncertain, the relationship between electricity deregulation and the production efficiency of nuclear industry, and the economic impact of China's land conversion program.

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Alix Peterson Zwane
Ph.D. Public Policy 2002
Senior Program Officer, Global Development, Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation
Alix Peterson Zwane is a Senior Program Officer on the Water, Sanitation, and Hygiene (WSH) team. Alix joined the foundation in 2009 after stints in the private sector and academia and manages the WSH measurement and learning portfolio, which includes grants to measure the impacts of WSH investments and to rigorously explore the determinants of technology adoption in the sector.
w: http://www.impatientoptimists.org/Authors/Z/Alix-Zwane

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