Ricardo Hausmann Analyzes South American Political Scene in Newsweek Interview

March 19, 2008
Doug Gavel

Venezuelan leader Hugo Chávez appears to be losing traction on the home front, even as military tensions remain high along the Colombia-Ecuador border. Ricardo Hausmann, director of the Center for International Development, analyzes the changing political landscape in South America in an interview published on Newsweek.com.
“It is unacceptable that Chávez decided to give moral recognition to a top leader of the [Colombian rebel group] FARC, treated him as a hero, and even asked for a minute of silence in his honor. [Raúl] Reyes was involved with many criminal activities. Terrorist activities. Chávez's attitude is outrageous,” Hausmann tells reporter Maria Christina Caballero MPA-MC 2003.
Hausmann also assails the Congress for not approving the free trade agreement negotiated between the U.S. and Colombia, whom he calls a “front-line state in the war against drugs and terrorism.”
Hausmann is professor of the practice of economic development at Harvard Kennedy School. Previously, he served as the first chief economist of the Inter-American Development Bank (1994-2000), and as Minister of Planning of Venezuela (1992-93) and as a member of the Board of the Central Bank of Venezuela.

Photo of Kennedy School Professor Ricardo Hausmann.

Kennedy School Professor Ricardo Hausmann, director of the Center for International Development

“It is unacceptable that [Hugo] Chávez decided to give moral recognition to a top leader of the [Colombian rebel group] FARC, treated him as a hero...Chávez's attitude is outrageous,” Hausmann tells Newsweek.com.


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