IOP Director Trey Grayson Named to Presidential Commission

May 22, 2013


Trey Grayson
, director of Harvard's Institute of Politics, has been named a member of the Presidential Commission on Election Administration. The announcement was made by the White House on Tuesday (May 21). The Commission was created "to identify non-partisan ways to shorten lines at polling places, promote the efficient conduct of elections, and provide better access to the polls for all voters."

Other members of the Commission include: Brian Britton; Joe Echevarria; Larry Lomax; Michele Coleman Mayes; Ann McGeehan; Tommy Patrick; and Christopher Thomas. Conference co-chairs are Robert F. Bauer and Benjamin L. Ginsberg.

Trey Grayson has served as the Director of the Institute of Politics (IOP) at Harvard University since January 2011 after previously serving six years on the IOP's Senior Advisory Committee.

He formerly served as Kentucky's Secretary of State 2004-11). Upon his election in his first run for political office in November of 2003, he became the youngest Secretary of State in the country. During his tenure, Grayson was recognized as a national leader in business services and government innovation – modernizing the Secretary's office by bringing more services online and enhancing Kentucky’s election laws through several legislative packages – and for reviving the civic mission of Kentucky schools by leading the effort to restore civics education in the classroom.

Grayson is a recognized expert on the Institute’s younger voter research effort exploring political beliefs of Millennials (18- to 29-year-olds), America's largest generation. Grayson's work as IOP Director is also focused on exploring ways to increase fairness in, and access to, the democratic and electoral process, including election administration, presidential primary and voter registration reforms.

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Trey Grayson

Trey Grayson, director, Institute of Politics

The Commission was created "to identify non-partisan ways to shorten lines at polling places, promote the efficient conduct of elections, and provide better access to the polls for all voters."