ITN Masthead

HKS in the News April 2, 2012

1. Capitol Police promotes first black female captains; agency had been accused of racial bias (Cole) Washington Post

2. ‘The End of Leadership’ - Followers are on the Rise: Author (Kellerman) CNBC.com

3. Senegal's political transition hinges on fulfilling economic dreams of the young (Juma) The Guardian (UK)

4. The future of power (Nye) PhysOrg.com

5. N.J. drivers cut back as society shifts gears, reflect national trends

(Muehlegger) The Star Ledger (NJ)

6. Is a Harvard Degree the Biggest Liability in Politics? (Parker) Boston Magazine

7. Miguel de la Madrid, President of Mexico in 1980s, Dies at 77 (de La Madrid) The New York Times


Capitol Police promotes first black female captains; agency had been accused of racial bias

Washington Post

March 31st

Quoted: Christine Cole

Topic: Law enforcement promotion policies

As Yogananda Pittman and Monique Moore climbed the ranks of the U.S. Capitol Police, they encountered no top-level supervisors who looked like them. No black women, from the chief down to the captains, were represented in the upper management of the federal law enforcement agency responsible for protecting lawmakers and congressional buildings…

Police departments have generally been slow to promote black women — partly because of promotional exams often alleged to be discriminatory and more likely to produce higher scores among white test-takers — even at a time when black men are increasingly in upper management, said Christine Cole, a criminal justice policy expert at Harvard’s John F. Kennedy School of Government .

“I don’t believe that we have an equally diverse command staff even though we have large and growing numbers of African-American men who have made their way to the title of chief,” she said…

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‘The End of Leadership’ - Followers are on the Rise: Author

CNBC.com

March 30

Commentary by: Barbara Kellerman, Center for Public Leadership

Topic: Trends in leadership

Our fixation is on leaders.

We assume that they have the keys to the kingdom, that they have most if not all of the power and influence, and that they make the decisions that most matter.

Wrong.

The fact is that leaders are increasingly vulnerable to forces beyond their control – and that followers are increasingly more entitled, emboldened, and empowered. Leaders, in short, are in decline, followers are on the rise.

It seems a paradox. On the one hand it’s contrary to conventional wisdom...

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Senegal's political transition hinges on fulfilling economic dreams of the young

The Guardian (UK)

March 29

Commentary by: Calestous Juma, Belfer Center

Topic: Senegalese politics and economics

Senegal's Abdoulaye Wade, who was defeated at Sunday's elections, drove himself out of office. He was undone with the help of the youth who had propelled him to power in the first place, and he overrated his own tenacity, a quality that had enabled him to lead Senegal's opposition movement for decades.

Over the past 10 years, the aspirations of young Senegalese have become increasingly focused on economic improvement, and Wade knew it. Speaking at the Harvard Kennedy School in 2007, he bemoaned the slow pace at which international aid agencies were responding to Africa's infrastructure needs. He praised China's quick response and shifted much of his attention to the east…

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The future of power

PhysOrg.com

March 30

Featured: Joseph Nye

Topic: Power in politics

What is power, and how can the United States effectively project power in the information or cyber age? This was the focus of a recent lecture by Joseph Nye as part of a seminar series on U.S. foreign policy sponsored by the Center for Global Security Research...

According to Nye, power is "simply the ability to affect others to get the outcome you want." There are three kinds of power: coercion (military might), payments (foreign assistance) and persuasion. The first two are considered "hard power," the third "soft power." And the appropriate use of both hard and soft power yields "smart power," which has been the watchword of Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton…

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N.J. drivers cut back as society shifts gears, reflect national trends

The Star Ledger (NJ)

April 1

Quoted: Erich Muehlegger

Topic: Trends in transportation

American motorists drove less last year than any since 1995, when songs like Montell Jordan’s "This Is How We Do It" and Alanis Morissette’s "You Oughta Know" pulsed out of car radios that certainly weren’t of the satellite variety.

Our country’s odometer, adjusted for the size of the driving-age population, has dropped by about 7 percent since it peaked in 2004. Experts say the decline isn’t just due to spiking gas prices — it’s also the result of long-term shifts in our society from the cradle to the retirement home.

"Let’s face it: The price of gasoline has a tremendous impact on the economy. When it starts to spike, particularly lower-income households feel incredible pain, and even high-income households notice it," Short said. "People will drive less, they’ll do less discretionary driving."

His view is shared by Erich Muehlegger, a public policy professor at Harvard’s Kennedy School of Government. "If you live in an urban area, there’s public transportation, Muehlegger said. "It’s sort of a very low-cost way to cut down on vehicle miles traveled."…

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Is a Harvard Degree the Biggest Liability in Politics?

Boston Magazine

March 28

Quoted: Richard Parker, Shorenstein Center

Topic: Harvard and politics

At some point in a politician’s career, a Harvard education stops being a point of pride and starts becoming a problem. In August, former Governor Mitt Romney derided President Obama’s foreign policy as being from the “Harvard faculty lounge.” Two months later, Senator Scott Brown laid into his opponent Elizabeth Warren, a Harvard professor, saying, “I didn’t go to Harvard, you know, I went to the school of hard knocks.”…

Richard Parker , senior fellow and lecturer in public policy at Harvard’s Kennedy School of Government, hypothesizes that those who villainize Harvard know they’re painting an inaccurate portrait, something they can get away with because they’re playing to a part of the population that’s more interested in perceptions than in truth…“This isn’t a story about Harvard,” Parker says. “It’s about the cheap side of American politics … and part of the American population. Quite frankly, it’s ignorance.”

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Miguel de la Madrid, President of Mexico in 1980s, Dies at 77

The New York Times

April 1

Cited: Miguel de la Madrid MPA 1965

Topic: The death of the former President of Mexico

Miguel de la Madrid , a former president of Mexico whose derided handling of the earthquake that devastated Mexico City in 1985 was the beginning of the end for the ruling Institutional Revolutionary Party, died Sunday morning in Mexico City. He was 77...

Born in Colima, on Mexico’s Pacific coast, on Dec. 12, 1934, Mr. de la Madrid graduated from the National Autonomous University of Mexico and later received a master’s degree from Harvard’s Kennedy School of Government. He began his career in government with a series of bureaucratic positions in Mexico’s central bank, at the state-owned oil company and in the finance ministry. In 1976 he became secretary of budget and planning under President López Portillo.

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In the HKS TV Studio

Pierpaolo Barbieri, Belfer Center

CNBC 3/30

Topic: Spain’s budget


This selection of media appearances is compiled by the Office of Communications and Public Affairs.

To submit an item please email Jane Finn-Foley


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