Faculty

Core faculty are listed below. CID is also affiliated with more than 50 faculty members from six Harvard schools.

Faculty_Hausmann_Ricardo_MS37_crop.jpg

Ricardo Hausmann is Director of the Center for International Development and Professor of the Practice of Economic Development at Harvard University. Previously, he served as the first Chief Economist of the Inter-American Development Bank (1994-2000), where he created the Research Department. He has served as Minister of Planning of Venezuela (1992-1993) and as a member of the Board of the Central Bank of Venezuela. He also served as Chair of the IMF-World Bank Development Committee. He was Professor of Economics at the Instituto de Estudios Superiores de Administracion (IESA) (1985-1991) in Caracas, where he founded the Center for Public Policy. His research interests include issues of growth, macroeconomic stability, international finance, and the social dimensions of development. He holds a PhD in economics from Cornell University. For publications, teaching, and additional information, visit his personal website.

Faculty_Khwaja_Asim_MS05_238.jpg

Asim Ijaz Khwaja is the Sumitomo-Foundation for Advanced Studies on International Development Professor of International Finance and Development at the Harvard Kennedy School, and the Co-Director of Evidence for Policy Design. His areas of interest include economic development, finance, education, political economy, institutions, and contract theory/mechanism design. His research combines extensive fieldwork, rigorous empirical analysis, and microeconomic theory to answer questions that are motivated by and engage with policy. It has been published in the leading economics journals, such as the American Economic Review, and the Quarterly Journal of Economics, and has received coverage in numerous media outlets such as the Economist, NY Times, Washington Post, International Herald Tribune, Al-Jazeera, BBC, and CNN. His recent work ranges from understanding market failures in emerging financial markets to examining the private education market in low-income countries. He was selected as a Carnegie Scholar in 2009 to pursue research on how religious institutions impact individual beliefs. Khwaja received BS degrees in economics and in mathematics with computer science from MIT and a PhD in economics from Harvard. A Pakistani, UK, and US citizen, he was born in London, U.K., lived for eight years in Kano, Nigeria, the next eight in Lahore, Pakistan, and the last eighteen years in Cambridge, Massachusetts. He continues to enjoy interacting with people around the globe. [Email]

Faculty_pande_crop.jpg

Rohini Pande is the Mohammed Kamal Professor of Public Policy at Harvard Kennedy School. She co-directs the Evidence for Policy Design (EPoD) program. Her work  has examined how institutions - ranging from electoral to financial - can be designed to empower historically disadvantaged groups; how low-cost improvements in information collection and dissemination can enable flexible regulation and more efficient outcomes in areas as diverse as environmental protection and elections; and how biased social norms, unless challenged by public policy, can worsen individual well-being and reduce economic efficiency. At Harvard Kennedy School, Pande is also the Area Chair for International Development. Her other current affiliations include Executive Committee member of the Bureau of Research on Economic Development (BREAD), co-chair of the Political Economy and Government Group at Jameel Poverty Action Lab (J-PAL), board member at Institute for Financial Management and Research (IFMR), and Research Associate at the National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER). Her publications have appeared in the top economics and policy journals. Pande received a PhD in economics from London School of Economics, a Master's from Oxford University and BA in Economics from Delhi University. [Email]

Faculty_Rema-Hanna_crop.jpg

Rema Hanna is the Jeffrey Cheah Professor of South East Asia Studies and a Co-Director of the Evidence for Policy Design (EPoD) program at the Center for International Development, Harvard University. In addition, she’s the Scientific Director for South East Asia at the Abdul Latif Jameel Poverty Action Lab (J-PAL), a Research Associate with the National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER), an affiliate of the Bureau for Research and Economic Analysis of Development (BREAD), and a faculty affiliate at the Harvard Center for Population and Development Studies. Professor Hanna is particularly interested in understanding how to make government services “work” for the poor in developing countries. She has worked on large-scale field projects with governments and non-profits to understand how to improve safety net systems, reduce bureaucratic absenteeism and reduce corruption. Given the threats to the poor from poor environmental quality, she’s also particularly interested in understanding how developing countries can regulate air pollution and the effectiveness of programs to improve indoor air quality. Her work has been featured in top economics journals (e.g. American Economic Review, Quarterly Journal of Economics, Journal of Political Economy) and numerous media outlets. She holds a Ph.D. in Economics from MIT and a B.S. in Public Policy from Cornell University. Prior to joining the Kennedy School, she was a faculty member at New York University.  [Email]

Faculty_Andrews_Matt_MS14_crop.jpg

Matt Andrews is  co-founder of the Building State Capability program at the Center for International Development. His research focuses on public sector reform, particularly budgeting and financial management reform, and participatory governance in developing and transitional governments. Recent articles focus on forging a theoretical understanding of the nontechnical factors influencing success in reform processes. Specific emphasis lies on the informal institutional context of reform, as well as leadership structures within government-wide networks. This research developed out of his work in the provincial government of Kwa-Zulu Natal in South Africa and more recently from his tenure as a Public Sector Specialist working in the Europe and Central Asia Region of the World Bank. He brings this experience to courses on public management and development. He holds a BCom (Hons) degree from the University of Natal, Durban (South Africa), an MSc from the University of London, and a PhD in Public Administration from the Maxwell School, Syracuse University.  [Email]

Faculty_Pritchett_Lant_MS02_crop.jpg

Lant Pritchett is Professor of the Practice of International Development at the Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University and co-founder of the Building State Capability program at the Center for International Development. In addition he works as a consultant to Google.org, is a non-resident fellow of the Center for Global Development, and is a senior fellow of BREAD. He is also co-editor of the Journal of Development Economics.He graduated from Brigham Young University in 1983 with a B.S. in Economics and in 1988 from MIT with a PhD in Economics. After finishing at MIT Lant joined the World Bank, where he held a number of positions in the Bank's research complex between 1988 and 1998, including as an adviser to Lawrence Summers when he was Vice President 1991-1993. From 1998 to 2000 he worked in Indonesia. From 2000 to 2004 Lant was on leave from the World Bank as a Lecturer in Public Policy at the Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University. In 2004 he returned to the World Bank and moved to India where he worked until May 2007. He has been part of the team producing many World Bank reports, including: World Development Report 1994: Infrastructure for Development, Assessing Aid: What Works, What Doesn't and Why (1998), Better Health Systems for Indias Poor: Findings, Analysis, and Options (2003), World Development Report 2004: Making Services Work for the Poor, Economic Growth in the 1990s: Learning from a Decade of Reforms (2005). In addition, he has authored (alone or with one of his 22 co-authors) over 50 papers published in referred journals, chapters in books, or as articles, as least some of which are sometimes cited. In addition to economics journals, his work has appeared in specialized journals in demography, education, and health. In 2006 he published his first solo authored book Let Their People Come.  [Email]

Faculty_Campante_Filipe_MS15_crop.jpg

Filipe R. Campante is Associate Professor of Public Policy at Harvard Kennedy School. He is interested in political economy, with special emphasis on understanding the constraints that are faced by politicians and governments beyond elections and formal "checks and balances," as well as the evolution and impact of cultural traits. His research has focused on topics such as the spatial distribution of population, the media, political protest and conflict, lobbying and campaign contributions, and religion. His work has appeared in leading academic journals such as the American Economic Review, the Quarterly Journal of Economics, the Journal of Economic Perspectives, among others. It has also received mentions in the New York Times, NPR, Washington Post, The Economist, Boston Globe, among others. Born and raised in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, he holds a PhD from Harvard University, an MA from the Pontifical Catholic University of Rio de Janeiro, and a BA from the Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, all in economics. [Email]

Faculty_Levy_Dan_MS72_crop.jpg

Dan Levy, Senior Lecturer in Public Policy and Faculty Chair of the Kennedy School's SLATE (Strengthening Learning and Teaching Excellence) Initiative, teaches courses in quantitative methods and program evaluation. He recently directed impact evaluations of girl-friendly school construction programs in Burkina Faso and Niger. He was recently involved in the evaluation of a conditional cash transfer program in Jamaica, a technical assistance project to Mexico's Social Development Ministry (Sedesol), the evaluation of an after-school program in the U.S., and a methodological review of studies comparing the use of various methods to estimate program impacts. He has served as a senior researcher at Mathematica Policy Research, a faculty affiliate at the Poverty Action Lab (MIT), and as consultant to several organizations including the World Bank, the Inter-American Development Bank, and the Global Development Network (GDN). He received his Ph.D. in Economics from Northwestern University, grew up in Venezuela, and is fluent in Spanish and French.  [Email]

Rodrik_crop.jpg

Dani Rodrik is Ford Foundation Professor of International Political Economy. He has published widely in the areas of economic development, international economics, and political economy. His current research focuses on the political economy of liberal democracy and economic growth in developing countries. He is the recipient of the inaugural Albert O. Hirschman Prize of the Social Sciences Research Council and of the Leontief Award for Advancing the Frontiers of Economic Thought. His most recent book is Economics Rules: The Rights and Wrongs of the Dismal Science (2015). He is also the author of The Globalization Paradox: Democracy and the Future of the World Economy (2011) and One Economics, Many Recipes: Globalization, Institutions, and Economic Growth (2007). He teaches courses on economic development and political economy. Professor Rodrik returned to the Kennedy School in July 2015 after two years at the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton as the Albert O. Hirschman Professor. [Email]

Ryan Sheely

Ryan Sheely is an Assistant Professor of Public Policy. His current research focuses on public goods provision and state capacity in Sub-Saharan Africa. He has conducted randomized evaluations and extensive archival and ethnographic fieldwork in Kenya, and has ongoing projects in Kenya and Sierra Leone. He is also the co-founder of the SAFI Project, a nonprofit organization that coordinates waste management and recycling activities in northern Kenya. His research has been supported by the International Livestock Research Institute, the Institute for Social and Policy Studies, the MacMillan Center for International and Area Studies, and the Program on Order, Conflict, and Violence, the Weatherhead Center for International and Area Studies, and Harvard Medical School's Milton Fund. He has worked with a variety of organizations including Innovations for Poverty Action, UNICEF, and the World Bank Development Impact Evaluation (DIME) Initiative. He received his PhD in Political Science from Yale University. [Email]