2023 Rappaport Policy Fellows 

Name
: Maya Alper
Graduate School: Harvard Kennedy School
Undergraduate School: Barnard College
Agency: City of Boston, Department of Innovation and Technology
Supervisor: Julia Gutiérrez, Chief Digital Officer
Mentors: Aisha Miller, Vice President, Related Beal and Rappaport Institute Advisory Board member and Aleja Jimenez Jaramillo, 2022 Rappaport Policy Fellow
Project Description: Maya worked with Boston Digital Service to amplify resident voices in the design of city services. During her fellowship she created a suite of user experience research tools to inform service design. Maya also designed an analytics dashboard to empower Boston.gov authors to make data-driven content decisions. These projects, taken together, help to further the Digital Service’s goal to make everyone’s interactions with and within City of Boston simple, frictionless, dignified, and accessible.

Name: Maria Aybar  
Graduate School: Brandeis University
Undergraduate School: Amherst College
Agency: City of Boston, Mayor’s Office for Workforce Development
Supervisors: Katy Gall, Deputy Director of Workforce Development and Lisa Bower, Senior Program Manager
Mentors: Kenneth Turner, President and CEO, Massachusetts Life Sciences Center and Rappaport Institute Advisory Board member and Melissa Bustillo, Boston College School of Social Work and 2022 Rappaport Public Policy Fellow
Project Description:  As a Rappaport Fellow, Maria was placed at the Boston Mayors Office of Workforce Development. She worked with the Tuition Free Community College (TFCC) Plan which recently expanded the cover the tuition costs of all students regardless of age, income, and immigration status. In her role, Maria identified ways in which TFCC funding and community college partners could be inclusive to immigrant students, in particular undocumented and English as Second Language (ELL) students. Maria worked closely with community college staff to understand the challenges they face as they work with undocumented students and also explore opportunities for increased support. This led to the creation of a report outlining challenges and proving recommendation for institutional incremental change. With the expansion of TFCC new challenges emerged on data collection and community outreach. Maria created a guide with best methods for data collection on students with diverse status in order to maintain their safety while avoiding their invisibility. She also developed a guide for strategies for community outreach as we try to better reach an older and immigrant population. She also proposed informed recommendations to TFCC as they plan to continue to expand. She worked closely with the English departments of each community college to obtain data on ELL students and subsequently inform and propose the expansion of TFCC to cover ELL single courses. Last, after a close examination of all short-term certificates covered by TFCC funding which require third party validation and state exams, and disqualify undocumented students, she proposed expanding the criteria to be more inclusive to this group.


Name: Tamara Bah
Graduate School: Fletcher School of International Law and Diplomacy, currently; School of Oriental and African Studies (SOAS), University of London, MA
Undergraduate School: The American University
Agency: Massachusetts Executive Office of Economic Development
Supervisor: Rory C. O’Hanlon, Deputy Chief of Staff and Director of Policy
Mentors: Liz Graham, Chief Operating Officer, Indigo Agriculture and Rappaport Institute Advisory Board member and Deepa Krishna, Managing Director, DPK, LLC. and 2009 Rappaport Public Policy Fellow
Project Description:   Tamara Bah worked at the Massachusetts Executive Office of Economic Development. She created a comprehensive small business needs assessment report that offers informed insights and strategies to foster progress and prosperity for small and micro businesses in Massachusetts. Through in-depth interviews, interactive listening sessions, rigorous data analysis, and field visits, the report aims to enrich the Healey-Driscoll Administration's Economic Development Policy and Bill, nurturing a conducive environment for small businesses. The findings shed light on the economic development landscape of the esteemed Commonwealth of Massachusetts.

Name: Sarah Ballinger
Graduate School: Harvard Kennedy School
Undergraduate School: Trinity College
Agency: City of Boston, People Operations Cabinet
Supervisor: Abigail Milewski, Director of Workforce Strategy and Planning
Mentors: Monica Tibbits-Nutt, Undersecretary, Massachusetts Department of Transportation and Rappaport Institute Advisory Board member and Katie King, Assistant Town Manager and Director of Operations, Needham, MA and former Rappaport Boston Urban Scholar
Project Description:  Sarah Ballinger is an MPP candidate at the Harvard Kennedy School with a focus on urban policy and innovation in state and local government. Sarah’s Rappaport Fellowship supported the work of the City of Boston’s People Operations Cabinet, where she focused on workforce development and strategy. She worked on two projects during her fellowship: 1) she facilitated the design of an emergency housing support program for city employees, which aims to help address housing instability amongst the City’s low-income workers, and 2) she collaborated with the city’s police department to assess the hiring process for 911 emergency call takers and make strategic recommendations for how it can be made easier to navigate for applicants and more effective for the City. Being embedded with the People Operations team deepened Sarah’s understanding of the challenges and opportunities facing city leaders when it comes to supporting, empowering, and growing its workforce strategically to provide high-quality service delivery for residents.

 

Name: Gilberto Calderin   
Graduate School: Fletcher School of International Law and Diplomacy
Undergraduate School: Brandeis University
Agency: Massachusetts Office for Refugees and Immigrants   
Supervisor: Leticia Ripalda, Senior Program Manager
Mentors: Mitch Weiss, Professor of Management Practice, Harvard Business School and Rappaport Institute Advisory Board member and Ân Lê, Director of Policy and Research, Boston's Equity and Inclusion Cabinet
Project Description:  During the previous summer, Gilberto had the opportunity to be a fellow at the Massachusetts Office for Refugees and Immigrants (ORI). His primary responsibility involved formulating a funding proposal to expand English for Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL) classes to serve the refugee and immigrant population better. With over 14,000 ESOL students on the waitlist, the demand for services far exceeds the current availability. ORI's proposal aims to bridge the gap between demand and availability, ensuring that immigrants across the Commonwealth can access the essential language instruction for successful integration and socio-economic empowerment.

Name: Mattie Harris   
Graduate School: Boston College School of Social Work
Undergraduate School: Dillard University
Agency: Boston Public Health Commission
Supervisor: Krystal Garcia, Director of Policy, Executive Office of Policy and Planning, BPHC
Mentors: Melissa Threadgill, Director of Strategic Innovation, Massachusetts Office of the Child Advocate, 2013 Rappaport Public Policy Fellow and Rappaport Institute Advisory Board member and Buki Sihlongonyane, Boston University School of Public Health and 2022 Rappaport Policy Fellow 
Project Description: Mattie will work in the Executive Office of the Boston Public Health Commission. Mattie will work at intersections of health equity across various projects, including the Community Health Needs Assessment (CHNA) and the Community Health Improvement Plan (CHIP). Additionally, she will work on innovative projects to address mental health disparities.

Name: Dyanna Jaye   
Graduate School: MIT
Undergraduate School: University of Virginia
Agency: Massachusetts Governor's Office of Climate Innovation and Resilience
Supervisor: Jonathan Schrag, Deputy Chief
Mentors: Joyce Linehan, Assistant to the President for Special Projects, Mass College of Art and Rappaport Institute Advisory Board member and Amanda Formica, Craft and Trades Specialist and Strategic Initiatives Manager, National Grid and 2018 Rappaport Public Policy Fellow
Project Description: Dyanna joined the Governor’s Office of Climate Innovation and Resilience. She worked with Deputy Climate Chief, Jonathan Schrag, on the EPA’s Climate Pollution Reduction Grant Program – a four-year program to develop updated statewide climate plans and develop a federal funding strategy for top priority climate actions to reduce greenhouse gas emissions while also maximizing benefits for environmental justice communities in the state. Dyanna will continue working with the Office of Climate Innovation and Resilience as the manager of this program.

Name: Matt Kamibayashi   
Graduate School: Harvard Graduate School of Education
Undergraduate School: Patrick Henry College
Agency: City of Boston, Boston Public Health Commission
Supervisor: Samara Grossman, Director, Center for Behavioral Health and Wellness, BPHC
Mentors: Diana Hwang, Founder and Executive Director, Asian American Women’s Political Initiative and Rappaport Institute Advisory Board member and Lauren Yoshizawa, Assistant Professor, Colby College and 2014 Rappaport Policy Fellow
Project Description:  During his time as a Rappaport Public Policy Fellow, Matt worked with the Center for Behavioral Health and Wellness within the Boston Public Health Commission. Matt’s research focused on the behavioral/mental health needs of Asian American and Pacific Islander (AAPI) youth in Boston. By examining national research, scrutinizing local health data, and talking to academic and community experts in Boston, Matt created an evaluative tool for BPHC that will ensure future resources, partnerships, and events are inclusive of particular needs within AAPI communities. Matt applied his findings by helping to plan a Fall 2023 AAPI mental health forum convened by Tufts CTSI and the Museum of Science.

Name: Prajna Cauvery Kotera Pooviah   
Graduate School: Tufts University
Undergraduate School: Amrita University
Agency: Massachusetts Executive Office of Energy and Environmental Affairs
Supervisor: Hong-Hang Chu, Program Manager, GWSA Implementation
Mentors: Karyn Polito, former Lieutenant Governor of MA and Rappaport Institute Advisory Board member and Rees Sweeney-Taylor, Net Zero Grid Program Manager, Massachusetts Clean Energy Center and 2021 Rappaport Public Policy Fellow
Project Description: Prajna Cauvery worked at the Massachusetts Executive Office of Energy and Environmental Affairs (EEA) with the Climate Mitigation Team. Her primary project involved conducting a cost analysis of additional decarbonization measures to further reduce statewide greenhouse gas emissions and comparing such costs with estimated costs of carbon dioxide removal options to achieve Net-Zero in 2050.  She analyzed modeling assumptions and outputs that informed the Massachusetts Clean Energy and Climate Plan for 2050, and studied emerging approaches to assess marginal abatement costs, along with strategies to reduce projected residual emissions in 2050. For the second half, Prajna delved into both nature-based carbon sequestration and technological carbon dioxide removal options, crafting a comprehensive comparative table elucidating projected costs and relevant facets of each option. She also researched emerging sustainable aviation fuel pathways, analyzing their emissions and costs in the context of Massachusetts' Net-Zero mandate and federal aviation policies. She presented her findings and recommendations to the technical and policy staff and senior leadership at the EEA.

Name: Evans Kyei
Graduate School: University of Massachusetts Boston
Undergraduate School: Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology
Agency: Boston Mayor’s Office of Recovery Services    
Supervisor: Catrina Cooley, Community Affairs Manager
Mentors: Dan Rivera, Executive Director, MassDevelopment and Vincent Sweeney, Boston College School of Social Work and 2022 Rappaport Public Policy Fellow   
Project Description:   During his fellowship at ORS BPHC, Evans actively contributed to opioid overdose prevention efforts within Black communities in Boston. He engaged in community assessments, stakeholder interviews, and curriculum development for faith-based leaders in overdose prevention. A key highlight was the data-driven recommendation he proposed to optimize the utilization of outreach vans, tailoring their presence based on specific times and locations. This approach aims to enhance the impact of outreach services and improve overdose prevention strategies. Through practical experiences, he honed skills in program development, community engagement, and collaboration with diverse stakeholders.

Name: Shane Lancer
Graduate School: Harvard Kennedy School
Undergraduate School: University of North Florida
Agency: Massachusetts Executive Office for Administration and Finance
Supervisor: Danielle Cerny, Deputy Chief of Staff and 2009 Rappaport Policy Fellow    
Mentors: Ellen Semonoff, Assistant City Manager of Human Services, Cambridge and Rappaport Institute Advisory Board member and Ben Forman, Research Director, MassINC and 2003 Rappaport Public Policy Fellow 
Project Description: Shane spent his fellowship summer at the Massachusetts - Executive Office for Administration & Finance (A&F) where he worked on the performance management team. During his fellowship he was lucky enough to assist on three distinct workstreams 1) helping in the coordination and facilitation of an incident command center focused on addressing family homelessness under the states right-to-shelter law, 2) managing consultants in the development of a data-dashboard to track the roll-out of the state’s new work-and-family-mobility act at the RMV, and 3) drafting, distributing and collecting surveys from A&F Commissioners & Executive Directors to solicit their input into the ongoing strategic planning process underway at the Executive Office of A&F. 

Name: Jenny Lau
Graduate School: Tufts University
Undergraduate School: Tufts University
Agency: Boston Mayor’s Office of Economic Opportunity and Inclusion
Supervisor: Elijah Miller, Director of Policy
Mentors: Segun Idowu, Chief of Economic Opportunity and Inclusion, City of Boston and Rappaport Advisory Board Member and Jessica Tang, Harvard Graduate School of Design and  2021 Rappaport Policy Fellow and Jessica Vonashek, Chief of Community and Economic Development, Norwalk, CT and 2012 Rappaport Public Policy Fellow
Project Description: Jenny worked on a number of projects to advance the City of Boston’s Office of Economic Opportunity and Inclusion, including the expansion of worker cooperative development by conducting outreach to workers, small business owners, and local community groups to understand how the City of Boston can better support the creation and sustainability of worker cooperatives as a small business model. The project identified local needs and challenges for worker cooperatives, particularly those for immigrant communities whose first language is not English like Chinatown, and recommendations on how city government can support the growth of worker cooperatives. Separately, Jenny conducted land use research to analyze property ownership in Mattapan Square to develop strategies on engaging local property owners in local economic development in priority main street squares in Boston. Jenny also advised on policy issues related to economic opportunity and inclusion like guaranteed basic income and environmental justice collaborations between city government and local neighborhood initiatives.


Name: Emily Moss
Graduate School: MIT
Undergraduate School: Wellesley College
Agency: Boston Mayor’s Office of Economic Opportunity and Inclusion
Supervisor: Andrew Grace, Director of Economic and Strategic Planning
Mentors: Devin Quirk, Director of Real Estate, Boston Planning and Development Agency, 2009 Rappaport Public Policy Fellow, and Rappaport Institute Advisory Board member and Max Wynn, Deputy Director, Homeless Housing Strategic Initiatives, NYC Department of Housing Preservation and Development and 2018 Rappaport Policy Fellow
Project Description:  Emily worked in the City of Boston Office of Economic Opportunity and Inclusion launching a forgivable loan program to support small business owners in acquiring commercial property as a strategy to improve wealth equity. The Commercial Acquisition Assistance Program (CAAP) was first announced in Fall 2022 but has lacked a formalized application process and implementation strategy. She supported the Office in conducting background research on similar initiatives in other cities, drafting loan guidelines and application processes, and facilitating strategic partnerships with financial institutions, philanthropic entities, legal counsel, and small business networks and technical assistance providers. She also authored a $700k grant application to the Barr Foundation requesting funding for internal staffing capacity to provide long-term oversight for the program.


Name: Alexandria Onuoha   
Graduate School: Suffolk University
Undergraduate School: Bates College
Agency: Massachusetts Office of the Child Advocate
Supervisors: Melissa Threadgill, Director of Strategic Innovation, Massachusetts Office of the Child Advocate, 2013 Rappaport Public Policy Fellow and Rappaport Institute Advisory Board member and Kristine Polizzano, Juvenile Justice Program Manager
Mentors: Edward Davis, President, Edward Davis Company and Rappaport Institute Advisory Board member and Takia Myers, Social Worker and 2020 Rappaport Public Policy Fellow
Project Description: As a Harvard Rappaport Public Policy Fellow within the Massachusetts Office of the Child Advocate (OCA), Alexandria was tasked with creating a research brief on foundational child and developmental theories that can be integrated into the various projects staff are embarking on. For example, the office is working on improving diversion programs for youth get diverted during the pretrial process. Alexandria proposed a more intentional focus on positive youth development to build on strengths youth already have to help them succeed rather than using deficit-based model. The research brief uses a developmental lens to assess frameworks that can be used to address issues related to family resource centers. This is one example, and the research brief has several examples of opportunities where foundation research in adolescence can be used to craft policy recommendations. The research brief included a social justice lens that is necessary for creating policy recommendations that would ultimately impact the development of youth at the margins (i.e., LGBTQIA+ youth, youth of color).  The second project Alexandria was tasked with contributing to the office’s overall project on Crossover Youth. Using data from Juvenile Justice Policy and Data Board (JJPAD) 2022 annual report, information learned in interviews with key stakeholders, and a national landscape review Alexandria created a policy brief that outlined the issues related to specific cohorts of youth involved in both the child welfare and juvenile justice systems. In particular, she focused on specific cohort populations that are often overlooked such as LGBTQIA+ youth, Black girls, Black nonbinary youth, gender non-confirming Black youth. Alexandria proposed a model informed by developmental theories and social justice lenses that could help address youth crossing over. She also proposed other recommendations that the office can consider based on interviews with child-serving personnel like service providers across the Commonwealth.


Name: Joshua Ozer
Graduate School: Simmons School of Social Work
Undergraduate School: Rice University   
Agency: Massachusetts Executive Office for Elder Affairs  
Supervisor: Lynn Vidler, Director of Home and Community Based Programs, Massachusetts Executive Office of Elder Affairs
Mentors: Myojung Chung, Assistant Professor of Journalism and Media Advocacy, Northeastern University and Rappaport Institute Advisory Board member and Kara Jeter, Care Coordinator, Phillips Eye Institute and 2018 Rappaport Public Policy Fellow
Project Description: Josh worked at the Executive Office of Elder Affairs (EOEA) primarily on the implementation of the Community Transitions Liaison Program (CTLP), a new and expanded program to support nursing facility residents who want to transition to community-based housing. Josh assembled a best practices guide for the program, working in collaboration with EOEA staff members, which will be used to train and educate program staff to work with nursing home residents on barriers to discharge. Josh also conducted research on care programs in other states to understand potential best practices for program design, and contributed to several trainings and informational meetings for the state’s Aging Services Access Points (ASAPs) responsible for implementing this new program. 

Name: Jiedine Phanbuh   
Graduate School: University of Massachusetts Boston
Undergraduate School: St. Anthony's College, Shillong, India
Agency: Massachusetts Water Resources Commission   
Supervisor: Vandana Rao, Director of Water Policy
Mentors: Joe Curtatone, President, Massachusetts Clean Energy Council, Rappaport Institute Advisory Board Member, and former Rappaport Urban Scholar and Rishya Narayanan, Climate Change Communications Strategist, Conservation Law Foundation and 2019 Rappaport Public Policy Fellow
Project Description: Jiedine placed herself at the Massachusetts Water Resources Commission which is responsible for developing, coordinating, and overseeing the Commonwealth’s water policy and planning activities. Her task was to determine which, if any, Massachusetts policy/laws/regulations require Public Water Suppliers and Municipalities to integrate their water and land use planning. Integration of water and land use planning is increasingly recognized as a water use efficiency, conservation and sustainability strategy.  In 2022, The Alliance for Water Efficiency (AWE) ranked the 50 US States based on their adoption and implementation of state-level laws and policies that advance water efficiency, conservation, sustainability, and affordability. Massachusetts ranked 13th out of 50 which is admirable, scoring 38 of a possible 89 points, but could have scored higher if we had scored any of 6 possible points for Land and Water Use Planning Integration Policies. After confirming MA has no direct supporting language in their codes, Jiedine searched the codes of Vermont, Rhode Island, Connecticut, Delaware, Maryland and Washington State for the language in their codes which allowed them to score points for mandating integration. Each state took different approaches to integration, through different legislative paths and jurisdictional agencies, with different language. She selected what she thought were “gold standards” of unambiguous language. To explore whether or not MA has a natural integration because our water suppliers and land use planners are mostly different departments in the same municipalities, Jiedine conducted interviews of planners in six towns/cities in the Greater Boston Area. She discovered integration was an ideal not often possible in practice due to disconnects between state planners and municipalities, federal, state and municipal jurisdictional conflicts, and lack of legislative mandates and funding for integration. Her final report will include proposed legislative language and points in the code where it could be inserted, and proposed future work to determine which state’s legislation is most effective at integration, and how that could be measured.


Name: Taylor Robinson
Graduate School: Harvard T. H. Chan School of Public Health
Undergraduate School: University of Pittsburgh
Agency: Massachusetts Department of Housing and Community Development
Supervisor: George King, Data Systems and Performance Analyst
Mentors: Celina Barrios-Millner, Vice President, Office of Race and Equity Research, Urban Institute and Rappaport Institute Advisory Board Member and Aja Kennedy, Tufts University and 2022 Rappaport Public Policy Fellow
Project Description: During her time at the Executive Office of Housing and Livable Communities (EOHLC), Taylor worked on two main projects across the Division of Rental Assistance and Public Housing. Taylor created the first Tableau dashboard of public housing and rental assistance data; this required working with almost 30,000 records of tenant data for the entire state of Massachusetts for those enrolled in Public Housing, the Massachusetts Rental Voucher Program (MRVP), and the Massachusetts Alternative Housing Voucher Program (AHVP). In this dashboard she assessed trends in demographic information, income levels and types, and cost of rent. She concluded this project with a memo listing recommendations on how to examine racial and ethnic inequalities in housing. The second project was to explore, quantify, and address missing fair market rent (FMR) data in the State Oversight Housing Assistance (SOHA) Data Warehouse. Taylor analyzed 50,000 records of data, created excel pivot tables of trends in missingness, wrote an executive summary, and presented this report to a collaborator in SOHA. The summary provided key information on missing FMR data over time and by Local Housing Authority and provided specific examples and instructions on how to correct missingness. Lastly, Taylor also briefly worked with the Supporting Neighborhood Opportunity in Massachusetts (SNO Mass), an EOHLC mobility program, and provided public health-oriented insights on opportunities to engage client populations in survey collection. These projects will help the department to better understand the client population, determine the cost impact of changing rental policies, and assess trends in how property owners set a rent amount.  

Name: Cara Safon
Graduate School: Boston University School of Public Health currently; Yale University, MPH
Undergraduate School: University of California, Berkeley
Agency: Division of Pregnancy, Infancy, and Early Childhood, Massachusetts Department of Public Health    
Supervisor: Ann Peralta, Director
Mentors: Steve Walsh, President and CEO, Massachusetts Health and Hospital Association, Rappaport Institute Advisory Board member and former Rappaport Boston Urban Scholar and Hill Wolfe, Postdoctoral Fellow, Yale School of Medicine and 2022 Rappaport Policy Fellow
Project Description: Cara will write a report consisting of lessons learned from other states currently implementing or developing policies to expand access to perinatal doula care. The report will include a thorough review of the literature on state efforts to include doula care in Medicaid. She will work with the Massachusetts Department of Public Health (MA DPH) and a Doula Partner Advisory Group to increase access to doula services in the state. MA DPH is seeking legislative authority to certify doulas and to set up a statewide system that reduces barriers to entry for a diverse group of doulas and ensure that all birthing people who want a doula have access to a competent professional that meets their linguistic and cultural needs.

Name: Emma Swarney
Graduate School: MIT
Undergraduate School: University of Waterloo, Toronto, Canada
Agency: Massachusetts Department of Transportation
Supervisor: Hayes Morrison, Assistant Secretary, Policy and Strategy
Mentors: Steve Poftak, Taubman Center Visiting Fellow and former General Manager of the MBTA and Andrew McFarland, Project Manager, Transit Priority, MBTA and 2019 Rappaport Policy Fellow
Project Description: During her time with MassDOT, Emma worked on identifying decarbonization strategies for Massachusetts centered around vehicle miles traveled (VMT) reduction policies. Her research was focused on identifying measures that had shown promise in academic research and were feasible to implement through MassDOT. She eventually selected parking cash-out, a policy in which employers offering their employees free or subsidized parking must offer employees who do not take the parking benefit the cash equivalent, as the most feasible VMT reduction strategy for Massachusetts. She spoke to over a dozen individuals from Washington DC to California, and with organizations including the Environmental Protection Agency to transportation management associations to identify best practices based on existing policies to design an effective program for Massachusetts. During her research, she discovered that State Senator John Kennan’s office was proposing a pre-tax transit benefit policy she had recommended to MassDOT as a first-step policy in implementing parking cash-out. She is now collaborating with Senator Kennan’s office and MassDOT to design a bill to mandate a cash-out law in Massachusetts.

Name: Rachel Weintraub
Graduate School: Harvard Kennedy School/MIT Sloan School of Management
Agency: Federal Funds and Infrastructure, Massachusetts Executive Office for Administration and Finance
Supervisor: Quentin Palfrey, Director of Federal Funds and Infrastructure
Mentors: Jay Gonzalez, President, Curry College and Rappaport Institute Advisory Board member and Jillian Standish, Senior Vice President, Chief Equity Underwriter, Merchants Capital and 2008 Rappaport Public Policy Fellow
Project Description: As a Rappaport Public Policy Fellow, Rachel worked for the Governor’s Director of Federal Funds and Infrastructure, who leads a recently formed office housed within the Executive Office for Administration and Finance and is tasked with driving the administration’s competitive efforts around federal funding. This summer Rachel focused on developing processes and management systems to support federal funding efforts in the state. Specifically, she helped to establish a process for prioritizing, tracking, and supporting federal grant applications. In addition, Rachel researched and recommended a process to streamline state matching funds requests.

 

2023 Rappaport Public Finance Fellows

Name
: William Boles   
Graduate School: Harvard Kennedy School
Agency: City of Boston, Office of Returning Citizens
Supervisor: Kimberly Rhoten, ORC Director of Policy and Strategic Initiatives, Office of Returning Citizens, City of Boston and 2022 Rappaport Public Policy Fellow
Mentors: Kim Janey, President and CEO, Economic Mobility Pathways (EMPath) and Rappaport Advisory Board Member and Alexis Farmer, Lean Project Manager, City of Detroit and 2020 Rappaport Public Policy Fellow
Project Description: As a 2023 Rappaport Public Finance Fellow,  Will assisted the Boston Mayor’s Office of Returning Citizens (ORC) in identifying, mapping and partnering with academic and non-profit organizations focused on healthcare access and needs of formerly incarcerated people in Boston. Will identified and engaged over 60 organizations working on health issues for formerly incarcerated people (FIP). We then began creating referral networks for organizations providing critical health services. Additionally, Will identified ways in which the ORC may better leverage its case management system to collect and report data on the health needs of FIP in Boston, positioning ORC to collect uniform data over time to coordinate with other services managed by the Boston Mayor’s Office. This experience taught me that the difference between existence of care and access to care is coordination.

Name: Alex Cardelle
Graduate School: Harvard Graduate School of Design
Agency: Boston Environment Team
Mentor: Christopher Norio Avery, Professor of Public Policy, HKS
Supervisor: Chris Osgood, Special Advisor to the Mayor
Project Description: Alex's fellowship was composed of two discrete projects that examined how the City of Boston and the BPDA could leverage business improvement districts to better organize and equitably finance climate resiliency measures in neighborhoods. Additionally, they researched best practices on how cities have used temporary flood deployables as an interim measure while longer-term resiliency measures are being developed. The fellowship focused on where these projects intersected and uncovered useful insights on the latest flood mitigation technologies, where businesses are funding resiliency projects, and how to democratic flood resiliency planning is happening at the neighborhood level.

Name: Jeanney Liu
Graduate School: Harvard Kennedy School
Agency: City of  Somerville
Supervisor: Ted Fields, Senior Economic Development Planner
Mentor: Kim Janey, President and CEO, Economic Mobility Pathways (EMPath) and Rappaport Advisory Board Member
Project Description: Jeanney will continue work at the City of Somerville's Economic Development Department focusing on mitigating gentrification in the city.


Name: Livesey Pack
Graduate School: Harvard Graduate School of Design
Agency: Massachusetts Environmental Protection Agency
Mentor: Amy Dain, Dain Research, 2002 Rappaport Policy Fellow
Supervisor: Kristi Rea, Branch Manager, Office of Regional Assistance and Integrated Strategies, EPA
Project Description: Livesey will continue work at the EPA that was started this spring.