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2022 Rappaport Policy Fellows 

Name
: Samantha Berlus
Graduate School: Brandeis University
Undergraduate School: Suffolk University
Agency: Massachusetts Office for Transitional Assistance
Supervisor: Eric Hansson, Research Manager
Mentors: Linda Dorcena Forry, Vice President for Northeast Region on Diversity, Inclusion, and Community Relations, Suffolk Construction and former Rappaport/Boston Urban Scholar and Alison Collins, Health Systems Advisory at USAID and Former Rappaport Public Policy Fellow
Project Description: Samantha had the opportunity to work at the Department of Transitional Assistance, where she participated in the creation of the Policy Academy, an educational course intended for potential hires at DTA. Because DTA hiring staff noticed a knowledge gap in regard to their hires and welfare programs like SNAP and TANF, the idea to fill in those gaps came about. In addition, the course would hopefully make hiring within DTA more competitive, hiring those who not only have the background knowledge in TANF and SNAP, but those who also understand the historical and cultural context of these programs. The goal would also be to hire those who can make meaningful connections to the work that is done at DTA, along with wanting to make a difference within the communities and individuals that DTA impacts. The 10-week course would ultimately give participants within the Policy Academy the skill sets needed to apply to their daily career work, whether within DTA or not. Samantha helped build and create the course, which has never been done within DTA's offices for new hires. Some of the work that she did included creating a curriculum outline, collaborating with DTA staff on the project, and helping create next steps for the project in the future. But what was most important to Samantha in doing this work was making sure that it was done with an anti-racism framework in mind, making sure that the course considered the historical, particularly the racial context of welfare in both the country and the Greater Boston area. 

Name: Michael Bueno    
Graduate School: Harvard Kennedy School
Undergraduate School: Texas A&M University
Agency: City of Boston, Mayor’s Office of Housing
Supervisor: Joe Backer, Housing Development Officer
Mentors: Amy Dain, Dain Research Consulting and Former Rappaport Public Policy Fellow
Project Description: Michael worked for the Boston Mayor’s Office of Housing conducting research to help inform the development of a pilot program to fund deep energy retrofits for affordable housing properties in the City. Mayor Michelle Wu and the Boston City Council committed $20 million in American Rescue Plan Act funds to stand up this initiative with the goals of improving energy efficiency, energy affordability, and climate resilience in deed-restricted housing, naturally occurring affordable housing, and public housing. Michael conducted interviews with housing property developers and experts in the field to understand where the City’s dollars can be additive to existing state and federal incentive programs for energy efficiency upgrades, bridging financing gaps that would otherwise limit implementation of these measures. He also provided recommendations for the agency’s Acquisition Opportunity Program (AOP) to align requirements with criteria for Mass Save’s LEAN Multifamily Program, ensuring future properties that go through AOP will be eligible for free energy efficiency assistance and upgrades.

Name: Melissa Bustillo
Graduate School: Boston College School of Social Work
Undergraduate School: Harvard University, Extension School 
Agency: Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education
Mentors: Lissy Medvedow, Executive Director, Rappaport Center for Law and Public Policy at Boston College Law School and Emy Takinami, Racial Justice Policy and Community Engagement Manager at FXB Center for Health and Human Rights at Harvard University and Former Rappaport Public Policy Fellow
Project Description: At the Department of Elementary and Secondary Education (DESE), Melissa supported the development of the Playful Learning Institute by assisting in centering racial and linguistic equity in the design and expectations of the new initiative. In addition, Melissa reviewed Social-Emotional Learning and Mental Health Wellbeing continuation grants to identify themes and understand advancement and prevention strategies schools and districts are implementing to support students, staff, and families. Lastly, Melissa organized the information to comprehensively present how schools and districts interact with the identified themes and trends and the types of partnerships they are initiating to make their grant plans possible.

Name: Claudia Diezmartinez
Graduate School: Boston University Department of Environment
Undergraduate School: Tecnológico de Monterrey
Agency: City of Boston, Department of the Environment
Supervisor: Hannah Payne, Carbon Neutrality Program Manager    
Mentors: Vivien Li, Rappaport Institute Advisory Board Member and Kara Runsten, Municipal Vulnerability Preparedness Manager, Massachusetts Executive Office for Energy and the Environment
Project Description: Claudia worked for the Carbon Neutrality team at the City of Boston's Environment Department, supporting the development of regulations and environmental justice metrics for Boston's Building Emissions Reduction and Disclosure Ordinance (BERDO 2.0). Claudia helped prepare a community engagement plan to ensure that Boston residents, environmental justice leaders, and other relevant stakeholders could participate in the creation and revision of regulations for BERDO 2.0. Claudia also conducted research and interviews across city departments to identify what type of data and indicators are available to monitor the impacts of BERDO 2.0 on environmental justice populations, including effects on air quality, energy costs burdens, displacement, and green workforce development.

Name: McKenzie Humann    
Graduate School: MIT
Undergraduate School: Tufts University
Agency: Boston Transportation Department    
Supervisor: Vineet Gupta, Director of Planning
Mentors: Stephanie Groll, Parking and Transportation Demand Manager, City of Cambridge
Project Description: This summer McKenzie worked with Boston’s Transportation Department (BTD) on two projects. In the first project she updated the City’s evaluation and analysis framework used to assess dedicated bus lanes. Using different data sources, she compiled metrics to evaluate the changes in throughput, traffic impact, and transit reliability over time for BTD to use to assess current and future bus corridors. In the second project, McKenzie evaluated the City’s resident parking permit (RPP) program based on data analysis of resident permit issuance, research on similar programs in other cities, and interviews with current program administrators in the City of Boston. Based on her evaluation, she recommended changes to the RPP program in order to achieve the City’s broader transportation and climate change mitigation goals.

Name: Alejandro Jimenez Jaramillo    
Graduate School: MIT
Undergraduate School: Harvard College
Agency: City of Boston Department of Innovation and Technology
Supervisor: Jeff Lambart, Director of Analytics
Mentors: Nigel Jacob, Visiting Fellow, Taubman Center for State and Local Government 
Project Description: As a Rappaport Public Policy Fellow embedded within Boston’s Department of Innovation & Technology, Aleja was tasked with investigating how Boston could improve its data governance practice. At a high level, data governance is the set of behaviors that City workers utilize to manage information, ranging from how they label data assets internally to community engagement efforts shaping the underlying value frameworks that guide how city data is used. Aleja's goal this summer was to help DoIT identify the end-state of its data governance system and prioritize interventions to get them there efficiently. To do this, Aleja analyzed the approaches that peer cities had taken to prototype or formally establish institutional systems supporting data governance. Aleja used these  findings to update Boston’s Open Data Policy, draft a data governance charter and committee structure, and define pilot projects that Boston City government could run to test implementation.

Name: Musa Kamara    
Graduate School: Boston College School of Social Work
Undergraduate School: UMass Boston
Agency: Massachusetts Department of Mental Health    
Supervisor: Daniela Harrigan, Director Community Engagement
Mentors: Emike Agudile, Senior Epidemiologist, Massachusetts Department of Public Health and Former Rappaport Public Policy Fellow
Project Description: Musa will work with the Massachusetts Department of Mental Health on accessing services for immigrants children with special needs. 

Name: Aja Kennedy    
Graduate School: Tufts University
Undergraduate School: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Agency: Massachusetts Housing Partnership
Supervisor: Tom Hopper, Director of Research and Analytics
Mentors: Jessica Vonashek, Chief of Economic and Community Development, Norwalk, CT
Project Description: Aja Kennedy used Massachusetts Housing Partnership’s new “Residensity” dataset to quantatively analyze the relationship between residential density and economic outcomes in Eastern Massachusetts. This project represented the first project making use of the new dataset, and supported MHP Research and Policy Team’s efforts to provide technical support for Massachusetts state and municipal governments as they prepare to implement the new multi-family zoning requirement for MBTA communities. Aja's final project can be viewed here.

Name: Madeleine Levin    
Graduate School: Harvard Graduate School of Design
Undergraduate School: Columbia University
Agency: City of Medford Department of Energy and Environment
Supervisor: Alicia Hunt, Director of Energy and Environment
Mentors: Ben Forman, Director of Research, MassInc and Former Rappaport Public Policy Fellow
Project Description: Madeleine worked with the City of Medford’s Office of Planning, Development, and Sustainability on Municipal Solid Waste (also known as trash). The City of Medford’s current waste hauling contract will expire in June 2023 and in planning for the next contract, the City appointed a nine-member citizen Taskforce to understand the needs of Medford residents. Through research comparing and interviewing nearby municipalities, exploration of a wide range of waste diversion strategies across the country and world, and discussions with the Solid Waste Taskforce, Madeleine created a final report assessing the Existing Conditions of Medford’s waste and recommending next steps for making it more sustainable and equitable. She also assisted implementation of near-term small-scale diversion and education strategies for waste streams in Medford including textiles, mattresses, and a compost subsidy program.

Name: Oscar Mairena
Graduate School: Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health
Undergraduate School: University of California Berkeley
Agency: Boston Mayor’s Office of Recovery Services    
Supervisor: Jennifer Tracey, Executive Director of Recovery Services
Mentors: Ramon Soto, Director of Government Advocacy, Boston Medical Center    
Project Description: As a Rappaport Fellow in the Mayor’s Office of Recovery Services and the Boston Public Health Commission, Oscar focused on identifying opportunities and challenges to expanding harm reduction services for people who use and inject drugs in Boston. Oscar worked on landscape and policy analyses to identify gaps in services, challenges to expanding services at harm reduction organizations, community and public health needs, and policy opportunities to improve conditions for people who use drugs. He also led several discussions with key harm reduction, clinical, policy and non-profit stakeholders in Boston. His work culminated in a report and presentation synthesizing his findings and providing recommendations for the City of Boston to expand harm reduction services in line with the 2019 Massachusetts Harm Reduction Commission recommendations.

Name: Kimberly Rhoten
Graduate School: Boston University
Undergraduate School: University of California, Berkeley
Agency: Boston Mayor’s Office for New Urban Mechanics
Supervisor: Sabrina Dorsainvil, Director of Civic Design    
Mentors: Ed Davis, Ed Davis Consulting 
Project Description: This summer, thanks to the exceptional generosity of the Rappaport family, Kimberly worked in the Mayor’s Office of New Urban Mechanics on reimagining post-incarceration reentry services for the City of Boston. Operating for several years on a small budget and with few staff, the Mayor’s Office of Returning Citizens (“ORC”) regularly sees and supports 1 in 10 of all Bostonians returning from jail or prison. Recently, thanks to the key leadership of Mayor Michele Wu and Boston’s City Council, the ORC will receive a 700% increase in their operational budget for FY2023. Kimberly's project this summer was to explore new and enhanced service pathways, resources, and programming for this growing office and to engage key stakeholders at the City, County, and State levels to improve reentry services in Boston. They also explored and developed collaborative formal partnerships across City and State offices to reduce administrative burdens on Boston’s returning citizens.  

Name: Maryam Salihu
Graduate School: UMass Boston
Undergraduate School: University of Wisconsin Superior
Agency: Boston Mayor’s Office for Women’s Advancement
Supervisor: Alexandra Valdez, Executive Director
Mentors: Brian Doherty, General Agent, Secretary Treasurer, Building and Construction Trades Council of the Metropolitan District and Setarreh Massihzadegan, UMass Boston and Former Rappaport Public Policy Fellow
Project Description: Maryam worked with the Mayor’s Office for Women’s advancement. She worked on a project that examined what other progressive cities were doing to advance women’s social and economic rights. This project also involved reviewing existing programs by the City of Boston Office of Women’s advancement and highlighting opportunities for improvement. Maryam’s final report underscored the following key areas: childcare and elder care, intimate partner violence, doula services, and universal basic income. She also highlighted the importance of information derived from communities, since communities often possess tacit knowledge that may aid policy making.  Finally, she provided evidence-based policy recommendations on how to continue to make the city of Boston more equitable for women.

Name: Aanandita Shrestha
Graduate School: Boston College School of Social Work
Undergraduate School: Marist College
Agency: Boston Mayor’s Office for Immigrant Advancement
Supervisor: Renato Castelo, Immigrant Integration Initiatives Manager
Mentors: Carol Leon, Rappaport/Boston Urban Scholar and Sasha Albert, Senior Researcher, Health Policy Commission and Former Rappaport Public Policy Fellow
Project Description: At the Mayor’s Office for Immigrant Advancement in the City, Aanandita focused on multiple components that addressed mental health wellbeing and civic engagement for immigrant communities in the Greater Boston area. Her first component involved working on the agency’s first mental health mini-grants initiative with the leadership team. Understanding that accessing traditional mental health services can be challenging for immigrant communities because of barriers from language and culture, the mini-grants supported seven immigrant-serving grassroots organizations that currently provide or incorporate non-clinical mental health interventions in their programming. Aanandita co-led the development of the program and the disbursement of grants to organizations that engaged in peer-led and community-based wellness interventions such as expressive arts, traditional medicine, spirituality, or body-centered activities. Through this work, she hopes that non-clinical practices promote well-being and reduce the potential escalation and severity of mental health conditions of immigrant communities and inform the City of Boston’s long-term support for mental health initiatives. The second component of her work was co-evaluating the agency’s Immigrants Lead Boston (ILB) program, a civic engagement course for 20 selected immigrant residents who wish to take more civic ownership in their community. Her evaluation highlighted the successful outcomes of the 2021-22 cohort and any factors that ILB may wish would continue to address for its participants. Her final component was creating the City Hall Tours Initiative Handbook that aims to increase the immigrant community’s spatial familiarity to City Hall and create a sense of community pride and ownership.

Name: Bailey Siber    
Graduate School: Harvard Kennedy School
Undergraduate School: Tufts University
Agency: Boston Mayor’s Office of New Urban Mechanics
Supervisor: Amy Mahler, Applied Policy Fellow
Mentors: Kelsey Edmond, UMass Boston and Former Rappaport Public Policy Fellow
Project Description: During her fellowship with the Mayor’s Office of New Urban Mechanics, Bailey explored opportunities to build cohesion between learning and movement in the City of Boston by connecting public library (BPL) and public transit (MBTA) offerings. She leveraged community-based participatory research methods to engage directly with library patrons and public transit riders, particularly transit dependent ones, about what they wanted to see result from BPL and MBTA collaboration. Respondents overwhelmingly indicated that BPL offerings would bring joy to public transit, and would even prompt them to opt to take public transit more often. Distinct findings for subsets of respondents by spoken language, neighborhood, public transit mode, and other factors were also identified and heavily informed suggested next steps. Recommendations for near term efforts to create a stronger public library and transit ecosystem included displaying real time public transit information at BPL branches, installing “pop up libraries” at bus shelters and on buses, and expanding language access across BPL and MBTA services.


Name: Bukiwe Sihlongonyane
Graduate School: Boston University School of Public Health
Undergraduate School: Dartmouth College    
Agency: Boston Public Health Commission    
Supervisor: PJ McCann, Deputy Chief of Staff and Former Rappaport Public Policy Fellow
Mentors: Renee Landers, Professor of Law, Suffolk University Law School
Project Description: This summer Buki worked with PJ McCann, Deputy Director of Policy and Planning at the Boston Public Health Commission, on evaluating city-wide policy interventions during the COVID-19 pandemic. She focused on key challenges around both internal and external stakeholder communication, with an eye towards both procedural and structural solutions. Buki used the valuable lessons she learned to inform the recommendations she presented, which we hope will inform future frameworks for shaping policy responses to not only the next pandemic, but to other public health emergencies as well.

Name: Julia Sproul    
Graduate School: Harvard Graduate School of Education    
Undergraduate School: University of Massachusetts Amherst
Agency: Massachusetts Board of Higher Education    
Supervisor: Keith Connors, Program Director for Academic Affairs and Student Success
Mentors: Valerie Eisenson, Harvard Kennedy School and Former Rappaport Public Policy Fellow
Project Description: Julia worked for the Department of Higher Education  (DHE) creating a Basic Needs Security (BNS) Action Resource Guide. This guide helps colleges and universities create or enrich existing BNS practices and resources to aid college students facing food insecurity, housing insecurity, lack of transportation, lack of childcare, etc. The DHE’s focus on Basic Needs Security showcases the Commonwealth's commitment to ensuring that students are not only able to get to college but to stay enrolled in college and eventually graduate. By addressing many of the BNS barriers that make it difficult for students to stay enrolled in college and providing resources to help with these hurdles, persistence and graduation rates will likely rise throughout the state. Addressing BNS is critical to ensuring that historically marginalized communities and non-traditional students are receiving an equitable education. The BNS Action Resource Guide will help shift the mindset from creating “college-ready students” to creating “student-ready colleges.” Learn more about Basic Needs Security here.


Name: Vincent Sweeney
Graduate School: Boston College School of Social Work
Undergraduate School: College of the Holy Cross
Agency: Boston Mayor’s Office of Housing
Supervisor: Jim Greene, Assistant Director for Street Homelessness Initiatives
Mentors: Adrianna Spindle-Jackson, Boston University School of Social Work and Former Rappaport Public Policy Fellow
Project Description: Vincent’s summer was spent at the Boston Mayor’s Office of Housing comparing stabilization models of agencies providing services to the formerly unsheltered homeless living on the streets of Boston. Information was gathered through a series of in-depth interviews with leadership at partner agencies and a weekly working group to determine best practices and recommendations to scale up services. Focus groups with newly housed, formerly unsheltered homeless individuals were conducted for input to improve the housing process. 

Name: Valentina Tovar
Graduate School: Harvard Graduate School of Education    
Undergraduate School: Texas A&M University
Agency: Boston Mayor’s Policy Office    
Supervisor: Tali Robbins, Deputy Chief of Policy
Mentors: Samantha Batel Kane, Harvard Graduate School of Education and Former Rappaport Public Policy Fellow and Christine Dahnke, Senior Director of Research, Accountability, and Grants, Orange County Public Schools and Former Rappaport Public Policy Fellow
Project Description: Valentina worked in the Boston of Mayor’s Policy Office in the Green New Deal for Boston Public Schools. Many of BPS school buildings lack the basic infrastructure, technology, and resources for a world-class education. To deliver on a quality guarantee, build healthy and nurturing physical environments, and align with our broader civic goals of equity, opportunity, and engagement the Green New Deal has been created. Valentina researched and developed key recommendations for creating a Master Facility Plan that encompasses renovations, mergers, new buildings and ultimately touches every school in BPS.  As the Facility Conditions Assessment and Design Study will share our future decision-making it has been valuable to gather research from peers in the field, analyze patterns and conclude on best practices moving forward.  Throughout the process of prioritization of facility renovation, she was able to create a rubric of prioritization for the district and provide a framework of community engagement in the rolling out and implementation of the plan. Additionally, she helped in the foundational context for the creation of a Children’s Cabinet. By creating a Children’s & Youth Cabinet (CYC), which coordinates city-based programs and services that increase equity, opportunities and reduce disparities for the children and youth of Boston. Valentina attended a conference with leaders of this work and researched peer cities to provide recommendations of best methods of practice and ultimately present a proposal on the framework for the cabinet, leadership and membership.

Name: Armando Vizcardo-Benites
Graduate School: Brandeis University
Undergraduate School: University of Massachusetts Boston
Agency: Massachusetts Treasury
Supervisor: Samantha Perry, Deputy Director of Economic Empowerment
Mentors: Mitchell B. Weiss, Richard L. Menschel Professor of Management Practice at the Harvard Business School
Project Description: This summer Armando interned at the Office of Economic Empowerment (OEE) at the State Treasurers office where he assisted on 2 initiatives. The first was to kickstart a grant and educational training program that would provide $4,500 to 14 individuals in Lynn/Springfield to start a home daycare program. In addition to providing grantees with on-going assistance, participants will get training on how to start their own childcare program and business-oriented classes. The second initiative Armando supported and will be continuing to assist throughout the fall is the development of a baby bonds proposal for the state of Massachusetts. This summer we convened a task force consisting of various stakeholders to recommend pieces of the baby bonds legislation we’re hoping to file by the end of the fall. He is leading two out of the four subcommittees – from coordinating the meetings and providing technical support to conducting a literature review on past program designs and a landscape analysis of other enacted/proposed baby bond programs across the US – there was and there is a lot to be done.

Name: Hill Landon Wolfe
Graduate School: Boston University School of Public Health
Agency: Boston Office of Veteran’s Services
Supervisor: Commissioner Robert Santiago
Mentors: Dan Futrell, Chief Executive Officer, Pat Tillman Foundation and Former Rappaport Public Policy Fellow
Project Description: Hill Wolfe worked with the Mayor's Office of Veteran Services developing a strategic outreach plan and engagement resource guide for building and sustaining relationships with veterans, especially from underrepresented groups in the greater Boston area. Hill’s project includes a relationship building model to assist individuals in becoming linked to critical services and experience a sense of belonging with the local veteran community.

2022 Rappaport Public Finance Fellows

Name
: Charuvi Begwani    
Graduate School: Harvard Graduate School of Design
Undergraduate School: School of Planning and Architecture, New Delhi
Agency: MBTA
Supervisor: Christina Marin, Deputy Director of Treasury Services and P3 Finance
Project Description: Charuvi completed the Rappaport Finance Policy fellowship with MBTA this summer where she continued work on the Greater Boston Applied Field lab project from Professor Bilmes’ class on looking at alternative uses and transit-oriented development (TOD) for the underutilized Lynn Commuter Rail Parking Garage. She conducted a high-level needs assessment of what the MBTA required from the Lynn Garage site and what kind of development proposal they would expect from a private developer. Working closely with the Finance, Real Estate and Parking teams, she provided a better understanding and detailed documentation of needs, limitations, key questions and decision points in terms of land uses, parking, bus and rail infrastructure, amenities, utilities, post-deconstruction state, etc. as well as future considerations and a potential timeline. Her final deliverable was a framework for a detailed and structured Invitation to Bid document to guide MBTA in drafting and releasing an improved ITB to be able to source better responses from private developers for a potential TOD project and lead to better project outcomes and partnerships. This framework may also be used by the MBTA for several other TOD projects lined up for the future.

Name: Jordan Biggers
Graduate School: Harvard Kennedy School
Undergraduate School: Spring Hill College
Agency: Boston Digital Equity Team
Supervisor: Peter Favorito, Broadband and Digital Equity Advocate
Mentors: Kelsey Edmond, UMass Boston and Former Rappaport Public Policy Fellow
Project Description: Jordan worked for the City of Boston’s Department of Innovation & Technology, partnering with intradepartmental stakeholders to establish the City’s digital equity & resilience strategic framework and project management plan for building the pillars of digital equity & resilience. This project supported the City’s longstanding efforts to close the digital divide for low-income and vulnerable communities as exacerbated by the Pandemic. Throughout the summer, Jordan implemented various components of the plan such as, weekly progress reviews and process interventions, a rebranding and marketing strategy for the digital equity fund and affordable connectivity program (ACP), digital equity fund impact reporting form, and ACP Digital Navigator Data Security Protocols.    

Name: Zeina Majdalani
Graduate School: Harvard Kennedy School
Agency: Boston Department of Energy and Environment
Supervisor: Kathryn Carlson, Executive Director, Rappaport Institute for Greater Boston and Hannah Payne, Carbon Neutrality Program Manager
Mentors: Kathryn Carlson, Executive Director, Rappaport Institute for Greater Boston
Project Description: Zeina continued a project that came out of coursework with the City of Boston’s Environmental Department and created an energy efficiency survey for inspectors to use to capture energy conservation opportunities and cost savings from retrofits in Boston’s building stock.

Name: Rozalyn Mock
Graduate School: Harvard Kennedy School
Undergraduate School: Oregon State University
Agency: City of Lynn
Supervisor: Professor Linda Bilmes, Harvard Kennedy School
Mentors: Amy Dain, Dain Research and Former Rappaport Public Policy Fellow
Project Description: Finance Policy Fellow, Rozalyn Mock researched housing issues related to inclusionary zoning in Lynn and Revere and authored a white paper on how these communities can better implement these policies. The paper is a tool for practitioners and communities to use when thinking about exploring inclusionary zoning as an approach to increasing the number of affordable housing units. Cities with characteristics like those of Lynn and Revere can see how these two communities laid the foundation for implementing an inclusionary zoning policy and how to determine the feasibility and impact of inclusionary zoning on local development.

Name: Isabela Reis
Graduate School: Harvard Kennedy School
Agency: Insper Instituto de Ensino e Pesquisa
Supervisor: Dimple Rana, Director of Community Health and Dr. Nathalee Kong, Chief of Public Health and Human Services
Project Description: This summer, Isabela worked with the City of Revere, conducting research on the non-profit space in the city. She identified, interviewed and surveyed multiple non-profit leaders that serve Revere to pinpoint their strengths, challenges, threats, and opportunities; with the overarching goal of understanding ways in which the City Government can better support these organizations and foster a thriving non-profit space in the city. The research also includes some actionable ideas for the City Government that could leverage non-profits in the city. Throughout the research, these interviews introduced her to a community that deeply cares about the city and is committed to improving the lives of Revere residents.

Name: Megan Willis-Jackson
Graduate School: Harvard Graduate School of Design
Undergraduate School: UMass Amherst
Agency: City of Lynn
Supervisor: Professor Linda Bilmes
Project Description: Megan Willis-Jackson, along with Rozalyn Mock, researched housing issues related to inclusionary zoning in Lynn and Revere and authored a white paper on how these communities can better implement these policies. The paper is a tool for practitioners and communities to use when thinking about exploring inclusionary zoning as an approach to increasing the number of affordable housing units. Cities with characteristics like those of Lynn and Revere can see how these two communities laid the foundation for implementing an inclusionary zoning policy and how to determine the feasibility and impact of inclusionary zoning on local development.