MPA/ID candidate Lucila Arboleya

Electives and Policy Tracks

The goal of the second year of the MPA/ID is to broaden the students' knowledge in the field and to deepen their understanding of a major area of development practice. Students choose their six electives from the broad array of courses available at HKS or through cross-registration with other graduate schools at Harvard University or MIT. They apply the theoretical and empirical tools learned in their first-year core courses to a policy area which they have chosen based on their professional and career interests.

National and International Economic Policies

Students interested in careers in this area should focus on courses on macroeconomic policies, international trade and finance, financial sector policies, and public finance (taxation and public expenditures) with an eye towards deepening knowledge in the institutional, political, and administrative aspects of policy reform.

Sectoral Policies and Programs

Students interested in this area should keep in mind two aims in choosing their courses:

  1. Developing the general public sector management skills that are relevant across a range of sectors
  2. Deepening their knowledge of specific sectors of interest such as:
    • Sustainable development
    • Social policy (including poverty, health, education, and community development)
    • Global governance, conflict, and human rights
    • Science, technology, and development

Private Sector Development and Its Regulation

Students in this area should focus on courses in finance and financial policies, the regulatory environment (including privatization), competitiveness and industrial policies, and policy related skills such as leadership and negotiation.

Additional Electives

Additional electives may be chosen from the broad array of courses available at HKS or through cross-registration with other graduate schools at Harvard University or MIT.

Faculty Feature

Brexit's blow to globalization

"With its systemic negative effects on finance, trade, and labor mobility, Brexit marks a major setback for globalization."

Carmen M. Reinhart is the Minos A. Zombanakis Professor of the International Financial System at Harvard Kennedy School. Previously, she was the Dennis Weatherstone Senior Fellow at the Peterson Institute for International Economics and Professor of Economics and Director of the Center for International Economics at the University of Maryland. Professor Reinhart held positions as Chief Economist and Vice President at the investment bank Bear Stearns in the 1980s. She spent several years at the International Monetary Fund. Reinhart is a Research Associate at the National Bureau of Economic Research, and a member of the Congressional Budget Office Panel of Economic Advisers and Council on Foreign Relations. She has served on numerous editorial boards, has testified before congress, and was listed among Bloomberg Markets Most Influential 50 in Finance, 2011. She received her Ph.D. from Columbia University. She teaches two elective courses, API-102 I Economic Analysis of Public Policy for International and Global Affairs (with Robert Lawrence) and ITF-270 Financial Crises: Concepts and Evidence.

Faculty Feature

Stavins

Thanks to Paris, we have a foundation for meaningful climate progress

"The problem has not been solved, and it will not be for years to come, but the new approach brought about by the Paris Agreement can be a key step toward reducing the threat of global climate change," writes Prof. Rob Stavins in the Cop21 blog.

Prof. Stavins is Co-chair of the MPP/MBA and MPA/ID/MBA Joint Degree Programs, and Director of the Harvard Environmental Economics Program. He is a Research Associate at the National Bureau of Economic Research, and a former Chair of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s Environmental Economics Advisory Board. Early in his career he  was a Peace Corps Volunteer, Ministry of Agriculture and Natural Resources, in Sierra Leone, West Africa, 1969 - 1973. He holds a BA in philosophy from Northwestern University, an MS in agricultural economics from Cornell, and a PhD in economics from Harvard. He teaches an elective course, API-135 Fundamentals of Environmental Economics and Policy.


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