Upcoming Sessions

Session Title
A Cutting Edge of Economic Development

Session Dates:
Dates
-
Application
Deadline:
Application Deadline

Program Director: Ariana Diaz
Program fee:
Program Fee
$9,100
Session Description

Applications may be submitted after the deadline and will be considered if space remains. Please contact the program director for additional information. 

Program Fee: The program fee includes tuition, housing, curricular materials and most meals.
Executive Certificate: This program is part of the Economic Development and Public Policy Executive Certificate series.
Executive Core Qualifications (ECQs): This program aligns with one or more Executive Core Qualifications.

An ever-expanding set of challenges across—and within—countries is making the practice of economic development more and more complex. New, pressing challenges continue to surface, such as rising inequality and urban/rural divides, with growth being concentrated in a handful of dynamic global cities.

Developed at Harvard University’s Center for International Development, A Cutting Edge of Economic Development explores the latest in development practice and research and how to incorporate those ideas into the strategic decisions of senior-level officials leading development institutions and government agencies. 

In just five days, you and your global peers will discuss in depth the common issues you face, from identifying what constrains project success to designing appropriate solutions. You will conduct a major rethink of “growth diagnostics”—the methodology that underpins many national strategies for both governments and multilaterals, and helps determine what prevents projects from achieving their goals. You will also be actively involved in the creation of new, groundbreaking frameworks that will help drive development in  the future. 

Faculty Chair Ricardo Hausmann on the Theory of Economic Complexity

Professor Ricardo Hausmann, Professor of the Practice of Economic Development and the Director of Center for International Development, explains his theory of economic complexity and productive theory.