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Many people anticipated a calmer new year, but what we witnessed in just three weeks was anything but: In rapid succession, the country experienced the January 6 mob attack on the U.S. Capitol, the January 13 vote for a second impeachment of then-President Donald Trump, and the January 20 inauguration of President Joe Biden at a heavily guarded Capitol building. 

Despite dramatic social transformations in the United States during the last 150 years, the South has remained staunchly conservative. Southerners are more likely to support Republican candidates, gun rights, and the death penalty, and southern whites harbor higher levels of racial resentment than whites in other parts of the country. Why haven’t these sentiments evolved or changed?

The history of elections in the United States is long, complex and fascinating. In this video, Professor Alex Keyssar shares three things you may not have known about U.S. elections, and after watching you may find your thinking on the subject has changed

Why presidents fail and how they can succeed again

In her new book,‘Why Presidents Fail and How They Can Succeed Again,’ Elaine Kamarck is looking to help future presidents understand the past, so they aren't doomed to repeat it. Using Jimmy Carter, George W. Bush and Barack Obama as examples, she argues that president's must balance policy, communication, and implementation evenly to succeed.

President George W. Bush

Political ethics: Is Edward Snowden a hero or a traitor?

On an episode of PolicyCast, Lecturer Chris Robichaud takes us through a new case study exploring the question of whether NSA whistleblower Edward Snowden was justified in leaking classified materials exposing the breadth of the U.S. government’s surveillance activities. 

Edward Snowden
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