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Table of Contents

Introduction
Chapter 1. The Selection of Immigrants
Chapter 2. Economic Assimilation
Chapter 3. Immigration and the Wage Structure: Theory
Chapter 4. The Wage Effects of Immigration: Descriptive Evidence
Chapter 5. The Wage Effects of Immigration: Structural Estimates
Chapter 6. Labor Market Adjustments to Immigration
Chapter 7. The Economic Benefits from Immigration
Chapter 8. High-Skill Immigration
Chapter 9. The Second Generation
Conclusion
Appendix A: Mathematical Notes
Appendix B: Construction of Data Extracts
References


Detailed Table of Contents


Introduction

Chapter 1. The Selection of Immigrants
         The Migration Decision
         Why Are There So Few Immigrants?
         The Roy Model
         A Special Case of the Roy Model and Extensions
         Linear Utility and "Generalized" Positive Selection
         Evidence on Selection


Chapter 2. Economic Assimilation
         The Identification of Aging and Cohort Effects
         Evidence on Aging and Cohort Effects
         A Model of Economic Assimilation
         Empirical Determinants of Assimilation
         Earnings Imputation: A Nontrivial Data Problem


Chapter 3. Immigration and the Wage Structure: Theory

         Homogeneous Labor in a One-Good Closed Economy
         Heterogeneous Labor in a One-Good Closed Economy
         The Nested CES
         A Two-Good Open Economy with Homogeneous Labor


Chapter 4. The Wage Effects of Immigration: Descriptive Evidence
         Spatial Correlations
         The National Labor Market
         Sampling Eror and Attenuation Bias


Chapter 5. The Wage Effects of Immigration: Structural Estimates

         A Nested CES Model
         Simulating the Wage Effects of Immigration
         Are "High School Equivalents" Equivalent?
         Descriptive versus Structural Estimates


Chapter 6. Labor Market Adjustments to Immigration

         Native Internal Migration
         Firm Responses


Chapter 7. The Economic Benefits from Immigration

         The Immigration Surplus with Homogeneous Labor
         Heterogeneous Labor
         The Global Gains from Open Borders


Chapter 8. High-Skill Immigration

         A Model of Immigration and Human Capital Externalities
         The Labor Market for Doctorates
         High-Tech Immigration
         Case Studies of High-Skill Immigration


Chapter 9. The Second Generation

         Income Mobility in Immigrant Families
         The Persistence of Ethnic Wage Differentials
         Ethnic Capital


Conclusion

Appendix A: Mathematical Notes

Appendix B: Construction of Data Extracts

References

Acknowledgments

Index



Excerpt from the Introduction

"A theme that recurs throughout the book is that immigration has consequences, and these consequences generally imply that some people lose while others benefit. The notion that immigration has both costs and benefits is somewhat foreign in the policy arena, where the lines of demarcation between the two extreme sides are clearly delineated, and immigration is almost always beneficial or almost always costly. In fact, both the theory and the data suggest repeatedly that costs and benefits matter, and the identification of these distributional consequences forms a core contribution of the economic approach.

A second theme is that the insights of the theoretical models and the findings from empirical analysis are not always robust to changes in the underlying assumptions or in econometric methods. Perhaps nowhere is this lesson clearer than in the literature that purports to estimate the impact of immigration on the wages of pre-existing workers in a host country. This literature has gone through several iterations in the 30 years since the initial studies were published. Each new generation of studies has certainly increased our understanding of the mechanics of the labor market impact, but each has also generated new empirical methods and evidence that often contradict what came before.

So let me succinctly state the question at the heart of this book: what does economics have to say about immigration and what do we have to assume to get it to say what we think it says? The presentation will often be critical and emphasize the need to be cautious in interpreting the implications of the models and the evidence. Nevertheless, I strongly believe that the economic analysis of immigration makes a valuable and unique contribution. If nothing else, it forces rigorous thinking and requires the delineation of the specific assumptions used in any examination of the determinants and consequences of international migration flows."





Data/Programs


Chapter 1
Chapter 2
Chapter 4
Chapter 5
Chapter 6
Chapter 7
Chapter 9